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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Almost hit the mark
Gladwell's "Blink" is an easy to read book, with the promise to provide insight in to making spilt decisions. Unfortunately Gladwell falls short off this promise. Even with this apparent shortcoming the book inspires to take close look at your own way of decision making. Clear examples and a great story telling style makes it all worth reading. For me it has been helpful...
Published on 21 Feb 2007 by Jan Bo Kristensen

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130 of 135 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting enough, but an expanded article rather than a book
Gladwell certainly writes well and entertainingly about an interesting subject - but as each new chapter started I began by thinking 'right, NOW we are going to have some advances, NOW the arguments are going to be explored and developed,' and basically, they never were. The book said what it had to say really within the first couple of chapters, with examples of where...
Published on 22 Feb 2007 by Lady Fancifull


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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 4 Aug 2014
A really good read and good service
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4 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars underrated, 4 July 2007
This book is a compelling read. It is initially somewhat like a novel, full of anecdotes, and this can lend an air of superficiality. However, in an efficient and very entertaining way, Malcolm Gladwell gets to the heart of how we make those split second 'gut reactions', and tackles an important subject in very accessible way. The anecdotal examples are a very useful tool, creating memorable scenarios in which to play out the concepts which are discussed.

He explores why sometimes these 'blinks' are right and sometimes they are wrong, and more significantly, how we can train ourselves to make more reliable instinctive reactions in future, by deliberate painstaking preparation and careful training of our brains with the necessary expertise, and also being aware of the standard errors, so that 'in the moment' it can make use of this absorbed knowledge to make accurate snap decisions.

Fascinating! And very accessible to the lay reader, with no advanced psychological background needed. Although it does touch on various existing concepts regarding false-positive defense mechanisms, overriding of red-flags, projection, dissociation etc, it is all explained in straightforward language, and in a quite individual style.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 13 Aug 2014
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brilliant book ! A must read!
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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Insightful, specially if you trust your gut feelings, 14 Oct 2006
By 
Mariano Tufro (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book might not be "scientific" as some reviewers complain about, but it contains a fair amount of things to think about in terms of using your intuition more often than some of us do.

In Myers-Briggs (MBTI) terms, I'm an N (intuitive), so I found the ideas quite aplicable. I should use my gut feeling more often, and some stories in this book convinced me to do so.

In an era where we don't have the luxury to gather lots of information before making a decision, books like Blink can help us become more effective, and realize how amazing the human brain is.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No wonder this is a best seller. The author explains in an easy to follow way, the power of snap decisions and how they work. It, 29 Oct 2007
No wonder this is a best seller. The author explains in an easy to follow way, the power of snap decisions and how they work. It shows how powerful and accurate instantaneous decisions can be, that we often are at odds to explain how we arrived at. Gladwell explains how these decisions are arrived at by the meticulous gathering of information by our unconscious.

However they are not always accurate and this is largely due to bias, such as stereotyping and prejudices. No doubt hormones play a role in that bias too, such as when people 'fall' in love and go on to marry that person. Gladwell here sites a number of studies by psychologist John Gottman, who discovered after studying thousands of interviews with married couples that he was able to tell with 95% accuracy whether a couple would remain together after 15 years from just observing an interview with a couple for 15 minutes.

An interesting book that makes one think about the powerful working of the unconscious and how to use it in beneficial ways.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Useful - Not what you expect., 27 Jun 2007
Blink is all about the power your mind has in the blink of an eye. It gives you an idea where and when this phenomenon occurs and gives many many examples. It also gets into 'priming' and some psychology of how the mind works. Very Enlightening Read, and it's highly reccomended for those that like to investigate how our minds work.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Counter-intuitive, 25 July 2006
By 
Jeremy Dent "Jeremy Dent" (Kings Langley, Hertfordshire, UK) - See all my reviews
I found the author's concept of thin-slicing very useful. It may not be framed in a way that satisfies academic psychologists but that's precisely one of his points: we are programmed to assess some things very quickly and our intuition is more often right than wrong, and often more right than traditional deductive logic.

I'll go with my gut feeling here! Read the book and understand a little more about how people judge you.
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6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Flexing my intuition muscle!, 9 July 2009
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"Blink" inspires me to listen to my intuition as I pay attention to my initial impulses and not over-think or second-guess myself. Malcolm Gladwell speaks of "thin slicing" - that first, unexamined "intuitive hit" that we experience before we start to analyze situations. Trusting my intuition can be particularly challenging when I have personal agendas that conflict with intuitive information I receive. I find that my intuitive skill set is easy to access when I am present with any given moment and not lost in my thought process, analyzing every little thing.

Another book that has strengthened my intuitive skill-set is Ariel & Shya Kane's Working on Yourself Doesn't Work: The 3 Simple Ideas That Will Instantaneously Transform Your Life. It is a brilliant book that has taught me that choices are always appropriate when I don't reach for conclusions based on my past experiences. With their easy & practical principles, I have found a deep sense of ease in my life as I learn to trust my intuition. Within the realm of wellbeing - intuition blooms!
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I decided in a few seconds this book is crappy psychobabble, 25 Sep 2010
By 
Rerevisionist (Manchester, England) - See all my reviews
It's not clear whether this book has anything in it that could be called a 'theory'.

Gladwell (if he wrote it - there's so much race awareness that I can't help wondering if the book was ghosted for a professional half-caste) has two characteristics, typical of the market aimed for: [1] They must have no knowledge outside any conventional establishment beliefs, [2] They must be swayed by emotions - violence, typically, though softer emotions peep in as well.

Some of Gladwell's examples are taken (I'd guess from popular books) from such worlds as art appreciation, wars, police activity, market research into drinks, and formal music. In each case the 'American' view is assumed without thinking (even momentarily). A few examples: Tom Hanks has appeared in essentially misleading films on e.g. AIDS, Vietnam war, Second World War, NASA - but Gladwell knows nothing of this, and quotes some real or imaginary casting person talking about Hanks's supposed wonderful screen image. There's an account of a cheap brandy, packaged in a boring way, losing ground to another brandy, packaged attractively. There's something similar about 'colas' - the amazing insight that one sip of a drink may have a different effect from a whole bottle. A 'veteran' of Vietnam is discussed (there is a painfully long digression on military matters) with no discussion of the rather overwhelming superiority of firepower.

The examples Gladwell gives of accurate spli-second decisions generally need huge amounts of preliminary work - e.g. whether a classical trombone player is good, whether an artwork is a fake, how to sell cars, whether a facial expression exists - two men (who appeal to Derren Brown) get quite long mentions, but their decisions are only possible because videos of facial expressions now exist. All of this material is what might resonably be called 'learning'. Some material, for example the effect of facial expressions on emotions (in addition to the other way round - something claimed by William James) or of words of a certain tone on peoples' behaviour (New Yorkers becoming polite because of reading scrambles sentences with polite words in) doesn't seem to connect with the general idea of the book.

One star. But only because I'm in a good mood.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars this book blew my mind!, 9 Nov 2013
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My boss recommended I read this book, however I never knew what I was getting into, however, after reading this book, I'm glad I did. Malcolm Gladwell presented this much overlooked topic of thin slicing which many including myself think we have good grasp of, and he turned it around and presented it with new insight, great research and better truths facing us.

I'd recommend this book to anyone who has to speak, deal, interact with another human. That way we can first understand and appreciate our frailties and then proceed to controlling these weaknesses.
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Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking
Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking by Malcolm Gladwell (Hardcover - 18 Jan 2005)
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