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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but Unstructered
Full of mind-blowing and fascinating facts and theories. It's difficult to dismiss the author's proposition that advanced civilisation dates back thousands of years earlier than is currently the "official" view and that these early civilisations may have been virtually wiped out by the catastrophic flooding and volcanic and earthquake activity accompying the ending of the...
Published on 28 Feb 2011 by Miker

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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not totally convincing
Fingerprints of the Gods seems to be the type of book that is either loved or loathed, either convincing people utterly, or leaving them mocking its credibility. I don't particularly stand in either camp.
Although many of the theories are interesting, and even possible, they are probably not the answers to the mysteries highlighted and the questions asked. Just...
Published on 23 July 2004 by Gryph


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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating but Unstructered, 28 Feb 2011
This review is from: Fingerprints Of The Gods: The Quest Continues (New Updated Edition) (Paperback)
Full of mind-blowing and fascinating facts and theories. It's difficult to dismiss the author's proposition that advanced civilisation dates back thousands of years earlier than is currently the "official" view and that these early civilisations may have been virtually wiped out by the catastrophic flooding and volcanic and earthquake activity accompying the ending of the last Ice Age.

But I do wish the book had been properly edited. It is full of repitition and is not presented in any sort of logical order. It could have been 30% shorter. Nevertherless well worth reading.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, but not totally convincing, 23 July 2004
Fingerprints of the Gods seems to be the type of book that is either loved or loathed, either convincing people utterly, or leaving them mocking its credibility. I don't particularly stand in either camp.
Although many of the theories are interesting, and even possible, they are probably not the answers to the mysteries highlighted and the questions asked. Just because there are flaws in accepted Egyptology, that does not mean that a race of super humans built the pyramids.
Hancock raises some very good points, and finds fascinating correlations in the themes of ancient myth. Unfortunately the conclusions he comes up with leave many more questions than you were faced with in the first place, and seem a bit too far fetched to be totally credible. His opinions may point to a different truth than that accepted by the close minded members of the archeological and scientific community, but in taking things too far into the extreme he will not be taken as a credible source by those he seeks to challenge.
The ideas put forward left me with the same feelings I have when reading conspiracy theory websites or books - it all seems possible, but when all weighed up after the event it just all seems too unlikely to wholly believe.
FOTG was definitely an interesting read, but rather than changing my life, as others have stated, it just changed the way I view ancient prehistory and the way it is perceived by modern scholars.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great entertainment, 29 July 2007
By 
Ray Blake (Hemel Hempstead, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fingerprints Of The Gods: The Quest Continues (New Updated Edition) (Paperback)
Whether you subscribe to Hancock's theories or not, there is no denying that this is an excellent read, thoroughly well-researched and written in an engaging and involving way.

Personally, I felt that the book should have sought to ask some of its questions without then feeling the need to speculate wildly to answer them. Nevertheless, it is a fascinating read and this new edition is worth the money even if you have the original.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Never mind Y2K; it's 2012 we need to worry about, 22 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This book is fantastic. Not for those with closed minds, to be sure, but for anyone with an interest in the pyramids, Atlantis, the Incas or the Aztecs or who finds the idea that Western science knows the answers depressing this is essential reading. I have read and re-read this book a dozen times and still have no idea how much of Hancock's theory I believe. But at the end of the day, it's intriguing and, dare I say it, entertaining.
The book opens with mediaeval maps which accurately depict the coastline of Antartica, despite the fact that it's been under miles of ice since the dawn of history. Rattling through flood myths which are pretty much identical all over the world, the mysteries of the lines on the Nazca plain, harbours built miles from the coast, pyramids that we could not build today, the precession of the equinoxes and much more Hancock reaches his conclusion in breathless style. (I would say that the conclusion is startling, but you do pretty much see where he's headed from the off.)
Some people will dismiss the whole book as bunkum, saying that you can twist the facts and suppositions to fit whatever theories you like. And they may well be right. But unlike other books which put the pyramids down to little green men from mars or magic, Hancock offers us a more convincing explanation. Even if you accept the 'conventional' ages of the pyramids, then I just cannot understand why the later ones are falling down while the oldest are still in pretty much perfect nick. The story of civilisations all over the world is that we get better at things as time goes on, not worse.
A fascinating and thought provoking read, with a sobering conclusion. Anyone for an end of the world party round at mine in 2012?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be compulsory reading!, 29 Nov 2011
By 
T. J. Walton "Tim Walton" (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fingerprints Of The Gods: The Quest Continues (New Updated Edition) (Paperback)
This book is so well researched and thought through, it should be compulsory reading. No wild speculation without foundation, but reasoned and realistic. No assumptions passed down and accepted from the ignorant. Open minded and incise.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars prepare to change your view of ancient civilisations!, 10 Feb 2000
By A Customer
I read this book in 1997, after having it recommended to me by a colleague. Since reading it, the subject matter has become one of my main interests. Books in a similar vein that I have gone on to read are from authors such as Robert Buval, Adrian Gilbert, Michael Baigent and Colin Wilson. 'Fingerprints' is one of the most compelling and informative books I have ever read. He brings so many ideas and theories together regarding ancient structures and civilisations and the final equation is no less awesome by having to wait 500 pages for it to be revealed. It is still highly compelling two years after reading it initially, and it cannot fail to change the way we view mainstream archaelogical theories on the timescales of human civilisation. The book is easy to follow, and he tells us of his journeys to many sites, descriptions of which make the reader long to see for themselves. He poses so many questions within each chapter to get the reader exploring in their own mind the evidence and possible answers there may be for what he describes. It is incredible to think that theories discussed in this book are still questioned when the answers are there for all to see in places such as Egypt and South America. I think this book should be complusory reading for all!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars you cannot be serious !, 10 Sep 2000
By A Customer
Ok, so maybe he is. This book is a great read, it is well illustrated and strangley plausable. here is the but.... it seems to me that the conclusionhad already been reached before the book even began. The 1st chapter-"the mystery of the maps " in one fell swoop seems to prove the existence of previous now lost civilisations . Hancock would have been better served giving us a more detailed examination of this area as a means of proving his theory. The rest of the book seems to be like cutting pieces from a jigsaw puzzle to make them all fit. Everything that is written is possible - not to mention plausable and seems to fit the theory. but as the bbc horizons program on this pointed out, there are some serious errors and ommissions in relation to the orion hypothesis (his star maps are upside down), and angkor wat as a map of a constellation. That said, as a whole the book is thought provoking and intensly interesting and entertaining. Even if like me you are a sceptic, dont dismiss it. Read it.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indy chasing the laws of precession, 17 April 2000
By A Customer
I am really glad this became a huge-selling best seller - glad that its insight, quality, and urgent importance didn't dwarf its sales , as it , sadly many times happen with many other radical works. This is not just a must-read ; Hancock's travels and searches are a heritage for all of us - as of course was the work on the same field of a few other researchers before him, who didn't get as famous as Hancock did. Well, it's great he did.. Most importantly - this book is shaking the foundations of Egyptogoly, and of many other "established" ways of thinking about our "past"... Ways of thinking that are now the basis of education and a norm distributed through the media. Things should change - this book is throwing some light onto our ignorance and darkness, and poses intriguing questions. It can be read as a transatlantic, transpacific Indiana Jones adventure , as well, if you want.. only this time it's based on real-life, disturbing facts...
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Chilling Finale, 2 Feb 2010
This review is from: Fingerprints Of The Gods: The Quest Continues (New Updated Edition) (Paperback)
This is about the only book of its type which is convincing enough to leave you worried at the end of it! Without giving anything away, read this with an open mind and try and ignore the one fault ever-present in this author's work: his failure to employ a ruthless editor to trim out the fat and constant repetitions which mar the book's readability.
The theories and alternative explanations of past civilisations and climate change are so well argued that the book still gets five stars. If only Mr Hancock could control his own verbosity, it would merit a 6.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Keep an open mind to all possibilities, 30 Jan 2012
This review is from: Fingerprints Of The Gods: The Quest Continues (New Updated Edition) (Paperback)
This thought provoking and thorougly absorbing book opens up a history that has been overlooked and ignored for far to long.It's time the archiologists,historians,astronomers and other accademics started to take a closer look at these ideas and put their heads together. Who knows what we my find out about ouselves and the world we inhabit if they do.
A must read book for anyone who dares to question the accepted versions of our ancestry.
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Fingerprints Of The Gods: The Quest Continues (New Updated Edition)
Fingerprints Of The Gods: The Quest Continues (New Updated Edition) by Graham Hancock (Paperback - 5 April 2001)
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