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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Black budgets & electro-gravitics
Nick Cook is an establishment journalist (Jane's Defence Weekly), which makes his investigation into the secretive world of the military-industrial complex's black budget such an impressive read.

Cook travels across Europe and the United States following a lead that could be the holy grail for the energy industries - that of electro-gravitics (anti-gravity...
Published on 5 Sep 2006 by Mr. Tristan Martin

versus
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Nice Story shame about the style
I looked forward to reading this book with great anticipation -- unfortunately, for me, the experience does not live up to the expectation. Cook writes in a breathless style that would be more at home in a Cold War thriller, all too obviously labouring to leave the reader gasping to turn the page at the end of each chapter. By adopting a sort of world-weary, cynical...
Published on 6 Jan 2002 by Barton Keyes


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Black budgets & electro-gravitics, 5 Sep 2006
By 
Mr. Tristan Martin (Hertfordshire, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
Nick Cook is an establishment journalist (Jane's Defence Weekly), which makes his investigation into the secretive world of the military-industrial complex's black budget such an impressive read.

Cook travels across Europe and the United States following a lead that could be the holy grail for the energy industries - that of electro-gravitics (anti-gravity being a conjoined taboo word); this is the very definition of surpressed science. Cook is well schooled in following the paper trail of black projects, having followed the development of Stealth aircraft.

Whilst the subject might seem foolish, Nick Cook is certainly not a fool and his investigation of such an explosive subject is both thorough and entertaining. One leaves the book feeling that he would like to have gone further in his research but to do so would be almost certain career suicide - for a piece of companion reading, I would suggest Timothy Good's Beyond Top Secret.

With Peak Oil upon us and wars currently being waged for domination over the remaining oil supplies, The Hunt for Zero Point may be a useful road map to get us out of the energy cul-de-sac.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining trip through the wilder shores of science, 7 Nov 2001
By 
ggh6@hotmail.com (Pennsylvania, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
Sometime in the early nineties, a photocopy of a 1956 article on the state of 'anti-gravity' aviation research landed on Nick Cook's desk at Jane's Defense Weekly. This event apparently sparked a personal, ten-year quest to determine the beginnings and current state of progress of research in this shadowy, oft-ridiculed field.
Cook approaches the subject as a detective story, revealing various fascinating tidbits of information at his own pace, and with an eye for the (sometimes overly) dramatic. His conclusion: late in WWII, at least two highly secret projects in Nazi Germany may have resulted in workable hardware that demonstrated counter-gravitational effects, and that the American world of 'Black Projects' may have deliberately suppressed information about these effects while simultaneously making covert attempts to understand them.
What makes this different from the usual wild-eyed conspiracy literature is Cook's own credentials as a respected aviation journalist, and a refreshing refusal to stray too far into pure speculation. Although many may wish for a bit more technical detail and a bit less spy-novelish prose, 'The Hunt for Zero Point' remains a provocative introduction to a series of sometimes fitful, always curious attempts to harness gravity over the past fifty years.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining trip through the wilder shores of science, 7 Nov 2001
By 
ggh6@hotmail.com (Pennsylvania, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
Sometime in the early nineties, a photocopy of a 1956 article on the state of 'anti-gravity' aviation research landed on Nick Cook's desk at Jane's Defense Weekly. This event apparently sparked a personal, ten-year quest to determine the beginnings and current state of progress of research in this shadowy, oft-ridiculed field.
Cook approaches the subject as a detective story, revealing various fascinating tidbits of information at his own pace, and with an eye for the (sometimes overly) dramatic. His conclusion: late in WWII, at least two highly secret projects in Nazi Germany may have resulted in workable hardware that demonstrated counter-gravitational effects, and that the American world of 'Black Projects' may have deliberately suppressed information about these effects while simultaneously making covert attempts to understand them.
What makes this different from the usual wild-eyed conspiracy literature is Cook's own credentials as a respected aviation journalist, and a refreshing refusal to stray too far into pure speculation. Although many may wish for a bit more technical detail and a bit less spy-novelish prose, 'The Hunt for Zero Point' remains a provocative introduction to a series of sometimes fitful, always curious attempts to harness gravity over the past fifty years.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Janes guy puts his neck on the block..., 18 Sep 2001
By 
Mike (Tunbridge Wells, UK) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
Intriguing book, and I desperately want it to be true... I really do. Whether it is or not... I dunno. Its either Janes guy uncovers massive new branch of physics and decides to tell the world or Janes guy makes a quick buck outta the fact that he's a Janes guy and people like me want this to be true... sorry Nick, I'm sure you'll appreciate that a little scepticism is a good thing. Either way it was a riveting read (hence the 4 stars) - and if its true then it'll destroy the airlines, aeronautics and the petrol and power industries in one sweep... thats either proof that its all BS or its undeniable proof that its all true.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One man's investigative search for the holy grail of physics, 3 Sep 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
Nick Cook, journalist for Janes Defence Weekly, takes us on a world-wide search through history and science putting together a jig-saw puzzle which connects Stealth, Podkletnov's gravity research, the Nazi's special projects division in the last days of the war, US black projects and exotic propulsion systems. Wading through intelligence, counter intelligence, multiple trails, dead ends and disinformation he leads us to the inevitable conclusion that the US has had anti-gravity technology since the forties.
This is a totally absorbing book, once started I couldn't put it down. Leaves you wanting more !
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Where's the Proof?, 18 Oct 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
Any book producing such diverse reactions must be worth reading, I thought, and couldn't wait for publication in the US to buy and read it. I found this book to be engrossing, intriguing, and thought-provoking from the first page to the last. One point that impressed me is that the author didn't reach his conclusions in haste but patiently and persistently followed the trail of evidence wherever it led over a period of years. And yet...the question I keep returning to is "Where's the proof?" The most difficult thing to accept is that the development of antigravity propulsion could be kept secret for 50 years, that this knowledge could be passed from one generation to another without some breech of confidentiality along the way--especially in the US which prides itself on freedom of information and where the media relentlessly work to uncover anything perceived as being withheld from the public. As a well-written detective story, this book is worth your money and your time. As scientific investigation, it lacks that one bit of tangential evidence that I need to overcome my skepticism.
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11 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A brilliant book - one in the eye for skeptics!, 6 Sep 2001
By 
This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
I cannot recommend this excellent book highly enough. Five years ago I embarked upon a voyage of discovery into the realm of black projects, Nazi UFOs and secret technology...only to be met with skepticism and some quite horrendous personal attacks.
My conclusions were that anti-gravity was a reality and that stories of "aliens" were simply a cover for the testing, evaluation and operation of secret military aircraft. I was right.
Now, in 2001, Nick Cook's 'The Hunt For Zero Point' has emerged to critical acclaim. He has done a fantastic job and gone to places and accessed documents that my colleagues and I only dreamed of seeing. His position with Jane's Defence Weekly stood him in great stead but he has been prepared to stick his neck out where the Gravity Research Group study of 1956 is concerned, the truth about advanced Nazi technologies (that the Germans were indeed ahead in several fields of research) and the arrival of these on US soil after World War 2.
Cook has discovered a new SS facility in Poland where work was undertaken, unearthed new documents, accessed photographic material via Bill Rose and much more besides.
I couldn't put this book down and neither will the open-minded reader who is able to leave the stench of political correctness behind him/her.
All those rumours about "anti-gravity" devices were true...but then you knew that anyway, in your heart of hearts. Now the issue is about control; who controls these technologies and what "they" are going to do with them.
In the meantime, read and re-read Nick Cook's book. It will cause panic within the ranks of Ufology, consternation within the Aviation enthusiast's community and a great deal of interest from the Military-Industrial complex.
Well done Nick!
Order today.
Tim Matthews.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book answered more than a few questions, 27 Jan 2014
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This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
I was drawn to this book recently and am glad that I followed my guts as this book has helped me understand many things, and put others in clearer context. For example it has enabled me to understand a bit better how the black world works, though I am curious how scientists can produce their best work in a climate of extreme fear. Somehow I think that far more could be achieved in a relaxed much less stressed environment. This could be one aspect of the negatives of the virus that Nick talks about in the latter part of this wonderful book.

As a criticism, I did not like how Nick had to almost apologise so often for thinking the unthinkable and going into conspiracy land. Mainstream science may not like it - but as Nick sort of admits and alludes to later on - that is where the real breakthroughs are made, before they get mainstreamed. This reputational risk issue is one of the biggest dampeners on scientific progress in my opinion.

While there were too many f words in there for my personal liking (only a handful in context) I feel that this book is worthy of 5 stars, for me at least, because it has answered so many questions for me, at this point in my life. Others may or may not feel the same impact.

If you are interested in exotic science, Nazi and American secret projects, triangular ufos etc, then this book will be interesting. However as Nick notes himself in relation to a chart on a wall in a military complex, "was that there for me to see?" I do wonder if this book contains any disinformation. But even if it does I found it a cracking read that took me 3 days as I immersed myself in every word.

Parts of it seemed a bit cloak and daggerish at times, but those explain themselves by the end.

So in summary, its a good read, and for me I was able to get a lot of valuable understandings and "ah-ha" moments from it.
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5.0 out of 5 stars brilliant, 3 Sep 2013
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This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
nick cook delivers ahard hitting research book which many wont believe. the story of the bell is amazing. how much technology was recovered at the end of the war.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Absorbing, 2 Jun 2013
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This review is from: The Hunt for Zero Point (Hardcover)
An absorbing 2001 quest by a Jane’s Defence Weekly aerospace consultant to investigate the possibilities of contemporary gravity-controlling propulsion systems being tested and employed by the US defence industry – technology allegedly acquired by America in the closing stages of World War Two from Nazi secret weapons research, its harnessing suggested by the subsequent development of such modern weapons as stealth aircraft.
I came upon the book cited as reference material for Chicago-based thriller writer James Rollins’ Black Order, which also named Johnjoe McFadden’s excellent Quantum Evolution – propounding that evolution is not random and that cells can make their own decisions to develop to their best advantage – as a further source for his exciting tale of old Nazi science on the rampage in the 21st century.
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The Hunt for Zero Point by Nick Cook (Hardcover - 30 Aug 2001)
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