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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Embers from the age of empire
This book is on the same sort of rank and the same genre as Out of Africa. A literary autobiography set in Kenya during an uncertain and enterprising colonial era before the First World War.

It's strongest elements include a deep sensitivity to the travails of animal life up against white hunters and farmers, very full accounts of the Kikuyu people and their...
Published on 16 Nov 2006 by Sarakani

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Flame Trees of Thika
This book is based on the childhood memories of Elspeth Huxley, growing up in Africa. I had watched the ITV adamptation in the1980's so was interested to read the book. I have too say I didn't enjoy the book as much as I thoughtI would but the descriptions of Africa,its animals etc was interesting.
Published 9 months ago by JOLO


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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Embers from the age of empire, 16 Nov 2006
By 
Sarakani (Harrow United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Flame Trees Of Thika: Memories of an African Childhood (Paperback)
This book is on the same sort of rank and the same genre as Out of Africa. A literary autobiography set in Kenya during an uncertain and enterprising colonial era before the First World War.

It's strongest elements include a deep sensitivity to the travails of animal life up against white hunters and farmers, very full accounts of the Kikuyu people and their rivalries with other Africans and it also paints a vivid portrait of pioneering planters and their servants in the shadow of the Great War.

The vantage of the book is greater than that of Out of Africa by Blixen being a less personal tale. it is a faithful, sometimes harrowing tale culled from an excellent store of memories representing times and scenes gone by. Huxley is not short on romance and tragedy.

This book is an ideal companion to those interested in the British Empire and African anthropology. For naturalists it provides breathtaking accounts of white hunters and their quarry as a retrospective commentary on man's abuse of Africa's wild heritage. Huxley writes quietly, sensitively and impartially providing philosophic insights in a heuristic and magical narrative. Always compelling, this is an important primary text.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stunning insight in a bygone era, 10 Sep 2003
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Emile Gregoire (Netherlands) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Flame Trees Of Thika: Memories of an African Childhood (Paperback)
Would have given this book 6 stars or more if I could. It is a terrific insight in how a child grows up in this bewildering setting that is so beautifully described. You can actually feel the dust settling on your skin after a long day of trekking through the untamed wilderness of Kenya, some 100 years ago. Probably romaticized, but hey: it's childhood memories: of course they are. Still, it gives you very good inside information on how the early settlers used to live and cope with their surroundings and the native community. Buy it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars Easy reading, 15 Dec 2013
This was an easy read and quite informative. Although I have lived in Africa, I still found it interesting with plenty of new vocab animals and tribes.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Brings back my childhood, 3 Sep 2013
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A wonderful read which reminds me of my own childhood, not in Kenya, but in cold England watching this on the TV. A wonderfully evocative read, of an age when people just got up, got out and got on. An inspiration, and a joy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Any old favourite, 24 Jun 2013
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Bought the book as have read it years ago and decided wanted to read it again - enjoyed it as I did the first time
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5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating evocation of times past, 2 May 2013
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Huxley creates a very powerful evocation of the draw and flavour of early colonial life in Kenya. The accounts of the actions and reactions of the native populations to the events occurring around them help make sense of the relationships between people and landscapes. There is a very clear sense of a past lost and you can see clearly how the colonial structures paved the way for many of the challenges that exist in Africa now.
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7 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars fantastic, 7 July 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Flame Trees Of Thika: Memories of an African Childhood (Paperback)
If you are going to read one book on Africa...let this be it. Wonderful character sketches, beautiful descriptions; if only we all had lived a life like this!
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Flame Trees of Thika, 3 Mar 2014
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This review is from: The Flame Trees Of Thika: Memories of an African Childhood (Paperback)
This book is based on the childhood memories of Elspeth Huxley, growing up in Africa. I had watched the ITV adamptation in the1980's so was interested to read the book. I have too say I didn't enjoy the book as much as I thoughtI would but the descriptions of Africa,its animals etc was interesting.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A gripping account......, 10 Feb 2013
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Mrs. C. Greenwood "Con Brio" (Anglesey, N. Wales) - See all my reviews
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I remember when this book was published quite a lolng time ago that I made a mental note to read it but it just didn't happen. A recent conversation with fellow-travellers on a train persuaded me to track a copy down. It proved really worthwile and I enjoyed every bit of it. Elspeth Huxley's account of her childhood in Africa when white settlers were acquiring land they had little idea what to do with and their relationships with each other, the native Africans is both interesting and enjoyable.

Highly recommended!
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The Flame Trees Of Thika: Memories of an African Childhood
The Flame Trees Of Thika: Memories of an African Childhood by Elspeth Huxley (Paperback - 2 July 1998)
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