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22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tyndale's New Testament Facsimile, 19 Sep 2008
By 
Anthony J. Carr "Rev. Dr. Anthony J. Carr" (Solihull England) - See all my reviews
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Two days ago I received a copy of the Facsimile 1526 edition of Tyndale's version of the New Testament. This edition was the first time that the New Testament had been translated from the Greek into English. Although the English Church did all in its power to prevent this edition being distributed they failed. Tyndale's aim was clear as he declared "The boy that driveth the plough shall know more of the Scripture than [an educated man]." The opposition took the form of the Bishop of London buying up all the available copies and burning them. He was so successful that only three copies of the original edition remain. One is in St. Pauls Cathedral but has 70 pages missing, the second is to be found in the British Library who purchased the book from the Bristol Baptist College for over one million pounds in 1994 and is on display there. I understand this is the highest price ever paid by the library for a book. The third copy was found by accident in the Landesbibliothek, Stuttgart, Germany in 1996.

This reproduction is from the British Library collection. It is truly a fine copy and with modern digital methods Hendrickson has produced a master piece. I had presented to me some years ago a facsimile edition of the Geneva Bible of 1591 for the price of £250 yet the quality of Tyndale's version is far superior to it. This version is in colour and I get a real sense of handling a piece of Church history. An earlier facsimile was sold one-bay for $1925.00 in December of 2007.(See Internet Bible Catalog). Being as all publications at this time were written in dialect more enjoyment is to be obtained by reading it out loud with a Gloucestershire accent!

The contents of the book I have already reviewed in the British Library Edition of 2000 by W. R. Cooper (Link?). Tyndale is almost forgotten in English History but not only did he set a translation that influenced almost all Bible translators for over 400 years but introduced modern English for the first time to the population. It is not too dramatic to say that if this edition had not been published, Shakespeare would be unknown today because he used the Geneva version English for his writings. In turn the Geneva compliers took Tyndale as its basis for their translation.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tyndale New Testament Facsimile edition (1526), 13 Jan 2010
By 
Anthony J. Carr "Rev. Dr. Anthony J. Carr" (Solihull England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile (Hardcover)
This review should be read in conjunction with the one I wrote for the Millennium edition of the Tyndale New Testament.

This edition is a faithful reproduction and one of the most clearest digital presentations I have ever read. It is turned out in the colours of the original. Only three copies are known to exist and only one is complete.

Tyndale virtually unknown to the English speaking world yet it was this very book that destroyed forever the notion that to write a book in England one needed to use Norman French with some Latin and Anglo-Saxon. Single handed Tyndale translated from the Greek to English the New Testament.
His language is truly beautiful although be warned it is written in dialect as all books of this age were. Speak Gloucestershire and the secrets will unlock themselves to you.

At that time the ordinary person in the pew was largely uneducated, the priests spoke and preached in Latin and little of the contents of the Bible were known to the public. A Latin bible cost about £40 in money of that time! Tyndale's aim was to make a copy cheap that even a plough boy reading it would be more conversant with Scripture than a bishop!

He did things like removing the word `church' replacing it with `congregation'. The Greek word ekklesia meaning `called out'. He also used the word `love' instead of `charity'. The King James Version put those words back into the scripture for obvious reasons.

The flow of his language is in many places poetical. It is a true saying that had not Tyndale written this book then Shakespeare would not be known today. Although Shakespeare used the Geneva Bible of 1560 that in turn was vastly influenced by Tyndale. In fact until the 20th century Tyndale can be seen in virtually every translation of the New Testament. It is estimated that the King James Bible contains up to 84% of Tyndale's New Testament.

Finally, to hold in your hands a reproduction of this book is to hold 16th century history and theology in one volume.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The First Modern English Book, 6 Dec 2010
By 
Dr. C. Jeynes (England) - See all my reviews
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Tyndale wanted anyone, rich or poor and especially the poor man, to have access to the unmediated word of God. Since Wyclif in the 14th century, the Lollards had been walking the country preaching the Gospel at great personal risk, but the English Bible they used was firstly manuscript (and very expensive) and secondly little more than a transliteration into poor English from the Latin (Vulgate) Bible. The 1408 Constitutions of Oxford made it effectively a capital offence to translate the Scriptures into English, and thus Tyndale had to effect his translation and its printing in hiding on the Continent.

At this time the English language was undergoing the "great vowel shift", effectively becoming intelligible to us. But the literate classes considered it a crude language, incapable of higher thought, which needed Latin, or some such proper language for expression. There was no literature in the new modern language. Then Tyndale's inflammatory text appeared, and spread like wildfire underground.

Tyndale was an exceptionally able scholar, fluent in all the European languages, and Greek too. He could even hear the Aramaic under the Greek text of Matthew. And we hear his translation today as beautiful English: this is because it is the underlying text of the New Testament of the King James bible of 1611. But at the time he was using the structure of the speech of the ordinary man, and turning this speech to unprecedented use. He claimed that the English of the ordinary man was very well matched to the ordinary Greek used by the New Testament writers, and his English is of the utmost clarity and immediacy. We still use it today! When we say things are "for the best" we are using Tyndale's text of Romans chapter 8 verse 28, one of very many places where King James does not improve Tyndale.

Thus, Tyndale's New Testament of 1526 is the first modern English book. And it has had enormous influence directly on us, since it has moulded the language, and moulded our thought with it right up to very modern times. When we hear and respond to the "Nine Lessons and Carols" from Kings College Cambridge, we are responding to Tyndale's text. And without Tyndale there would have been no Shakespeare! This is an important book!

The facsimile is an absolute delight. It is beautifully laid out and printed. The medium is certainly not the message, pace Marshall McLuhan, but it makes the book compelling to read. The popularity of this inflammatory text must have been boosted by the sheer pleasure of looking at the physical pages. This is a world changing book presented in a form of the very highest quality.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "I am still here", 16 Jan 2012
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This review is from: The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile (Hardcover)
As the ghost of William Tyndale taps the folio leaves of the King James Bible, these are the closing words of David Edgar's play for the RSC "Written on the Heart" which is about the relationship between the translation of the 1611 King James Version translators and Tyndale's. 84% of the King James version of the new Testament is unaltered Tyndale, which is perhaps a better review than I can write. This is a lovely book, with facsimile pages of the original. The English is not easy to read, as it is somewhere between Chaucer and Shakespeare in density, but quite easy to work out. Given the size, which approximates the original, I had to use a magnifying glass or reading lamp - but don't let this put you off. It is wonderful to see the English language in a period of transition. The humanism of the language is so refreshing, and he really was trying to make a translation which would speak to the reader, whilst retaining great intellectual integrity with the text. Much of it was translated in a small cell by candle light and smuggled out by sympathisers. You hold in your hand a book the ownership of which, in those days, was punishable by death! If there were six stars, this book would get them.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Tyndale Bible Facsimile, 18 May 2010
By 
C. M. Noble (uk) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile (Hardcover)
We cannot own a manuscript or as in this case one of the first printed works in the English language but we can own the next best thing - a facsimile edition. This is almost pocket sized and is most attractive with its Gothic script. It is a little difficult to read at first but getting used to the unfamiliar spelling soon comes. It is possible to buy another bible which is not facsimile but which reproduces the original spelling to make reading easier. I bought both books.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Olde England, 4 Dec 2011
By 
M. L. Richings "m_richings2" (Birmingham, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile (Hardcover)
The words 'Treasure' 'a gem' are used far too lightly these days, in some cases without merit or due consideration, but in this case it is without a shadow of a doubt more than deserved, William tyndale was prepared to risk his life to defy the Catholic establishment and bring the rich beautiful words of the gospels and epistles in English, the language of the common majority that was on the rise, church and state decreed with an iron fist that the bible must be preached in Latin , the language it had been in for over a thousand years, talk of change was brutally dealt with, then in 1526 years of painstaking work paid off as these modestly priced beautiful little volumes appeared in print for the first time, the outraged catholic state had them all (or so they thought) hunted down and burned so much so that only 3 survived and this is an exact page by page reproduction of the only complete one that this country owns which is in the British Library, the other which has 78 pages missing is in St Pauls Cathedral, so if your looking to give a true priceless Jewel for Christmas this year give them this little piece of our heritage
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Revelation for the people, 4 Aug 2013
By 
M. Ogden "Mike of Cambs" (West Walton, Cambs, U.K.) - See all my reviews
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What better book could you read, this was the route that brought God's true message to the mass population, telling the truth about the doctrines of the established church, and showing what God really wanted mankind to do.
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4.0 out of 5 stars You have to try it, 26 Feb 2014
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This review is from: The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile (Hardcover)
I tried and failed to get on with this version. I opted to try the original spelling. My short comings I believe.
It is worth having a copy just for the art work. I am intending to try and see the original on display and some time in the near future.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A real treasure, 24 Nov 2013
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This review is from: The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile (Hardcover)
Tyndale was the first Bible translator to use the Divine name in English. Just think he gave his life for this book.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A wonderful facsimile of one of England's greatest books, 16 Sep 2013
By 
Christopher Edwards (Crowborough, East Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile (Hardcover)
This is a brilliantly produced facsimile of Tyndale's 1526 New Testament - the first to be translated direct from the Greek into English. The book, of course, was hunted down by the Tudor establishment, burned wherever it was found, and would ultimately claim Tyndale's own life.

Tyndale's pioneering work was instrumental not just in the Christian Reformation, but in the development of modern written English. The copying and production of this edition is so good that is not difficult to read.

Only three copies remain; but this facsimile means you can hold a piece of English history in your hand.
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The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile
The Tyndale Bible: A Facsimile by David Daniell (Hardcover - 1 Sep 2008)
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