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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jim Lords it over today's Rock Stars
There is a tendency for fans of the 1960s rock band the Doors to hail the poetry of singer Jim Morrison as a work of genius. I wouldn't go that far but I would describe it as invigorating and as stimulating as any other modern 20th century verse. This book features the only two works which were published before Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971 aged 27. 'The Lords'...
Published on 12 Jun. 2004 by Mr. Hugh Harkin

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars listen to the music
That Jim Morrison was an excellent poet and an insightfully tortured soul is beyond doubt. But to find that out you only have to listen to the lyrics of his songs with The Doors. They are this potent because, like any great poetic work, they were put through rigorous and objective editing, by the rest of the band and production team, and the end result was perfectly toned...
Published on 7 Mar. 2012 by Gilolc


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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jim Lords it over today's Rock Stars, 12 Jun. 2004
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Mr. Hugh Harkin "hugh_harkin" (Worldwide) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Lords and the New Creatures: The original published poetry of Jim Morrison (Paperback)
There is a tendency for fans of the 1960s rock band the Doors to hail the poetry of singer Jim Morrison as a work of genius. I wouldn't go that far but I would describe it as invigorating and as stimulating as any other modern 20th century verse. This book features the only two works which were published before Jim Morrison died in Paris in 1971 aged 27. 'The Lords' is subtitled 'Notes on Vision' and is a beautiful dialogue on the way we present ourselves to the world, drawing special attention to cinema which was one of Jim Morrison's great loves. He attended film school at UCLA and contrary to the film 'the Doors' he graduated after completing the course.
Reading 'The Lords' it becomes obvious that Jim Morrison was incredibly well read, with much of this reading taking place before he became a famous rock star. When you become a rock star you are far too busy taking drugs, having sex in seedy motels and drinking Wild Turkey to be reading. Without cracking the framework of the poem, Morrison informs us about the journey of entertainment from the earliest days, through the creation of the pleorama, panorama and diorama by the pioneers of cinema and key-holders of vision.
'The New Creatures' contains 3 fairly long poems which feature classic Morrison images relating to dark streets, savage deserts and endless highways leading to death. From these pieces we see how Morrison distilled his poetry and allowed the drops to seep into the lyrics of one of the most subversive bands ever to batter their way into the Top 40.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'Everything is broken-up and formless', 12 Mar. 2003
This review is from: The Lords and the New Creatures: The original published poetry of Jim Morrison (Paperback)
This is a fine twinning of 'The Lords' and 'The New Creatures', the only poetry published in Morrison's lifetime. A fine twinning, but a troubled one; but as ever for me, it is in stark contrasts that experiences become memorable.
The first offering - 'The Lords' - a work of supreme genius, discusses the role of performance and voyerism in the spectacles cinema, photography and primitive religion. At turns pornographic, maleficic, insightful, and, of course, shamanistic. It is easy to get the feeling that this is a work that particularly gets at Jim Morrison's personal/professional philosophy (others-Wildchild, American Prayer...?) Its months since I've even seen my copy but the shere brilliance of the imagary makes quoting (perhaps not accurrate) but vivid: in 'The Lords' we are confronted with the modern cinema where bodies become 'dry stalks' for the sake of the eyes - Lee Harvey Oswald and JFK become reduced to mere images by TV, and the Shaman/rockstar is respected, in a way now lost in modern society. It is in this way that the whole work can be seen as a critique of modern society's over emphasis upon the visual sense - the Shaman/rockstar exists to remind us of the wider sensual being, a being of exagerated movement, of dance and passions embodied, shared. I love this piece.
However, what follows - 'The New Creatures' - is, in a sense, a let down for me - I don't hate it, but the contrast is harsh and the two don't read easily together. Whereas the first poem is prose, has a direction, even a philosophy, 'The New Creatures' is fragmented, directionless. The poetry in this undiciplined section only seems to exists inside Morrision's own head, what we perceive is a jumble of words and messages - occationally familiar lyrics - that remains elusively just short of poetry. 'Everything is broken-up and formless': nowhere more than here. Consequently, 4 stars could be more appropriate. But one of the joys of poetry is the discussion and debate that ensues. Poetry SHOULD unsettle us, returning unbidden to us with a creeping pleasure, or perhaps terror, long after the reading. I believe that this particular twinning will provoke both as you struggle to reconcile the two sections and your response to each.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars listen to the music, 7 Mar. 2012
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That Jim Morrison was an excellent poet and an insightfully tortured soul is beyond doubt. But to find that out you only have to listen to the lyrics of his songs with The Doors. They are this potent because, like any great poetic work, they were put through rigorous and objective editing, by the rest of the band and production team, and the end result was perfectly toned songs.
The poems in this book were self-published, and it shows. It feels like Morrison is trying way too hard to be a poet. None of it seems genuine, unlike his songs. Morrison contained the arrogance necessary to be a great rock star/poet, but the arrogance that made him a confidant and memorable performer also compromises his work when unmetered by outside opinions. The end result is pretentious and at times incoherent.
Having read more about Morrison I can understand what he talks about here, but great poetry should cause passion and understanding on its own merit. I don't have to know what inspired 'The End' or 'The Unknown Soldier' to feel moved by them; I cannot say the same for this material.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars abstractions in symphony , brilliant, 10 April 1999
By A Customer
A true voice of america, a view point not often seen, heard or understood. Sit with this book, under the stars, or with the ocean waves pulsing at your feet, and the meanings will flow through you like liquid lightning. Slow down, read it, think about the dazzling words, and the more incrediable images Jim paints with his unique language... america misses bold poets like these... long live morrison . . . read it . . .
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars This is a very interesting collection of Jim's Poetry., 19 Feb. 1999
By A Customer
However it is not better poetry as found on the AMERICAN PRAYER album. Jim's poetry is very abstract and the meaning of the poems are often associative and difficult to understand. It is interesting because these poems were written while Jim was in film school and released while he was still alive. I am disappointed that the original cover was changed where before there was a picture of him wearing a beard which had him more poetic looking.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fragmented writings of a lost soul, 15 May 1999
By A Customer
I'd been looking for this book forever, so when I found it at amazon.com, I ordered it right away. I admitt, I was a little annoyed with the in-your-face cover, but the poetry made up for it. One can only marvel at the perceptions with which Jim Morrison viewed the world. While fragmented, and a little spacey, the poetry still gave me a feeling for the era in the United States which sparked such fueled aggression.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I love Jim Morrison but this is too much..., 1 Mar. 1999
By A Customer
I can understand that people who are so into Morrison could read this and walk away feeling like they've been blessed and enlightened by the greatest poet they've ever read, BUT, c'mon. This stuff isn't really all that good. Bits and Fragments of thoughts abound, nothing really cohesive throughout. Jim talks alot about his views of cinema and society as some monster of its own free will. Fans should seriously check out Wilderness and American Night, as well as the American Prayer CD. All of which are much more understandable and, not to mention, enjoyable to have. Add this one to the collection though. It is Jimmy darnit. But, if you want real poetry, get the Doors illustrated lyrics book. Now THAT's some real good writin'!
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Tough To Take, 1 Oct. 2005
This review is from: The Lords and the New Creatures: The original published poetry of Jim Morrison (Paperback)
Phew! After just a glance at 30 or 40 pages I now remember this book with a feeling almost like cramp in my memory!
This 'poetry' is pretty tough to take, and as others have said, it is rather self-indulgent to say the least.
This does bring home that The Doors were a good group, not just due to the Morrison lyrics, but the marriage of his poetry and the music.
This book brings to mind coffee-shop poetry readings, and earnest teenagers taking life way too seriously mingled with intellectual snobbery.
As poetry, it's average and lurid. As a curiosity in the popular culture of the time, it's interesting....in small doses!
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book shows Jim in his prime., 30 Jan. 2001
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This review is from: The Lords and the New Creatures: The original published poetry of Jim Morrison (Paperback)
This book combines both 'The Lords' and 'The New Creatures'. It is carefully and thoughtfully laid out. It truely brings out the best of his poems in this special book. If you like the poems by Jim Morrison you must have this book in your collection!!
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5.0 out of 5 stars This book RULES!, 22 Jun. 1998
By A Customer
This is the only book of Morrison's poetry that I have read, and I must say it was great. The vivid imagery created was haunting, frightening even. But Morrison cotorts it to a way that was quite thought provoking. I really liked it.
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