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4.7 out of 5 stars40
4.7 out of 5 stars
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VINE VOICEon 20 April 2004
A brilliant first hand description of what it is to be like to be afunctional alcoholic, someone who has a good job, a home, a boyfriend, and on the surface a perfectly normal and respectable life.

Caroline Knapp tells everything just the way it was, from the perspectiveof several years spent in Alcoholics Anonymous, sparing no embarrassing details of what happened along the way. Her aim is clearly to try and helpothers with her story, which is far more common (at around 10% of the population) than most people's impressions of what an alcoholic is ordoes. She doesn't try and glamorise her drinking, and the book is sobrutally honest that I felt I almost knew her by the end of it!

Sadly a few years after writing the book the author died from another addiction (lung cancer as a result of smoking), which make her mother's final words on her death bed to Caroline (as revealed in the book) particularly prophetic.
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on 21 January 2003
Quite simply one of the most eye-opening books I have ever read. It is not a "self help" book, nor an advertisement for AlAnon, but a frank and very insightful glimpse into the world of the "high functioning" alcoholic.
Apart from those who have never touched a drop in theirs lives, I guarantee that there won't be a single person who doesn't at least identify with some parts of this book.
Caroline Knapp doesn't just tell us that the road she traveled is bad, what she does so well is to shine a light on that road, so we can see where we are, and where we are going, and make our own minds up. And she manages to do all this with great humour, and of course sadness.
I have never been able to say "That was a bad day, I deserve a drink" after reading this...without stopping to think what I am saying. It didn't stop me enjoying a drink, but it did make me realise the line between social drinking and alcoholism is so very faint, that I might just not notice crossing it. This book makes that line a little clearer.
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on 13 April 2009
This book has to be the best book I have ever read. As a 32 year old woman there were so many issues Caroline had that I can completely identify with.

This thought provoking read has made me take a serious look at myself, my drinking, and choices (bad ones) which I have made under the influence of alcohol.

I have read, and will re-read this book. Totally inspirational. Such a shame Caroline died at the age of 42 from lung cancer. Defiantely my next demon I must tackle.

This book has made me realise I have so much to live for.
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on 10 October 2006
I'm always hesitant to read sobriety books that include promoting AA as the only way to stay sober and indeed Knapp was of the same opinion - even going to a meeting and deciding it wasn't for her for a number of years until going back. She doesn't 'bang the book' throughout and is quite honest about some of her compatriots who have recovered without AA.

I have read many books on the addiction subject and where Frey's 'A million little pieces' is sensationalised, this strikes the reader as pure honesty. Knapp writes so well you begin to think of her as a heroine. She does not have the many crazy antics most alcoholics have gone through (although she is a lifelong drunk driver) but she is pointed enough to understand that for her, the cheating lieing and coverups is as bad as any car wreck

This is a fantastic inspiring read.
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on 10 February 2009
I am more than 3/4 way through Caroline Knapp's book: Drinking, a love story. I am a 27 year old married mum of 1. I drink with friends, with family and on my own. My one wish after reading this book would have been to meet Caroline and sit with her drinking coffee and talking for hours. I can not recommend this book highly enough to anyone who has wondered if their drinking pattern is 'normal' or not. This lady was clearly a natural born writer (a journalist actually). After her many years as an 'active alcoholic', she beat the disease, something I can only describe as feeling like you are giving up life itself, then she was took from the world by another disease, lung cancer, and so i find myself not only thinking, yet again, that god takes the very best of us, but also feeling she left a mark in the world: this book.... it truely is that outstanding.
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on 20 April 2010
This is a must for anyone who has a drink problem but is in denial. There are elements that relate to anyone who drinks any amount. A cautionary tale for allof us. Excellent.
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on 7 March 2006
If anyone has ever battled with alcohol or the thought of being an alcoholic this books reaches inside your inner thougts and gives to the strengh to carry on. It is the only book that has ever explained the way I felt when I gave up alcohol it is truly a love story with a happy ending. Truley inspiring.
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on 18 May 2005
"Drinking A Love Story" is a stellar novel that puts a real voice on addiction. More than just being about an alcoholic, it's about being a functional alcoholic which is so incredibly eye opening. While "A Million Little Pieces" and "Basketball Diaries" are very graphic about over the edge, in the gutter, can't function in society addicts; "Drinking: A Love Story" is even more compelling because it's about someone you could well know. "Drinking: A Love Story" equates favorably to the better books in the field, books like "Smashed", "My Fractured Life", and "Dry."
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on 13 May 2015
A really in depth account of a how this person's social drinking of alcohol gradually increased and lead into the decline of alcoholism and how this person, with help, is able to ascend back out of the hole and live a contented life. All the honesty about feelings and emotions both before, during and after give a great insight and warning into how addictive alcohol can become....and how initially it can help you cope with what's going on in your life to being your life......in my opinion a great eye opener read!!!
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on 14 November 1998
Anyone who buys this book expecting a gourmet guide to wine will be disappointed, but that doesn't mean it isn't an excellent book. It's the best and most devastating account of a woman's struggle with alcoholism and recovery that I've ever read. It's courageous, heartbreaking and in places very funny. I identified with almost every page; it's helped me and a lot of other people stay sober and I'd recommend it to anyone who loves to drink and wonders if they might be an alcoholic.
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