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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking
Very interesting book, made me think in a slightly different way and question some of my own hidden traits. One thing lacking for me though is that I don't think She acknowledges women who actually want sexual satisfaction on their own terms, whether that's in a loving consensual relationship or whatever other means She wants to. I believe this must be and is possible...
Published on 3 Nov. 2011 by Audio Sponge

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35 of 66 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars ACADEMIC INTEREST ONLY
‘Pornography – Men Possessing Women’ is one of the most famous works of anti-pornography feminism. In it the author attempts to demonstrate that not only is the manufacture of pornography a form of violence against women, but also that pornography itself, as a concept is an act of violence against women.
‘Pornography…’ is at best...
Published on 26 Dec. 2003 by Mr. Robert J. Evans


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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Thought provoking, 3 Nov. 2011
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Very interesting book, made me think in a slightly different way and question some of my own hidden traits. One thing lacking for me though is that I don't think She acknowledges women who actually want sexual satisfaction on their own terms, whether that's in a loving consensual relationship or whatever other means She wants to. I believe this must be and is possible. Maybe it was just a sign of her times though. God knows what She would have thought about the internet...

To end; Men are and have been horrible to women for so long it's really depressing.
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24 of 35 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Extreme, but that's Dworkin for you, 13 Jan. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
This book is certainly not bedtime reading. It is uncompromising. Unbelievably so. However, despite its polemical nature, the book is of immense value. Indispensable for anyone who wants an alternative side to the pornography debate, Dworkin illustrates with frightening savageness the dark, macabre side of male sexuality. After reading this book, you will never see the world in the same light again. This is no casual platitude. Be prepared - this book is disturbing.
However, this book is not without flaws. As with all her work, Dworkin is too extreme for most readers. Anti pornography sentiments are expressed far more objectively and coherently by Susan Griffin, in "Pornography and silence" and by Catherine Mackinnon in her work. Her ravaging of the male sexuality is actually self defeating; she will alienate many men who might have been convinced by the truths in her arguments. Her work is not backed up by real facts. The causal relationship of pornography and physical violence towards women is logical, but evidence does not actually support this. Also, her concentration on pornography with a violent content takes the focus away from pornography in general.
Nevertheless, it is essential reading to anyone with more than a passing interest in the pornography debate. I don't know if I agree with all she says, but what she has succeeded in doing is to make all who read "Pornography" stop and think about an issue that has gone too long ignored.
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17 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Eye-opening and innovative, 20 Nov. 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
Extreme admittedly, but not twisted, Andrea Dworkin's sexual philosophy is an indispensible aid to students of gender studies, power relationships and pornography. Although many readers (particularly male ones..) may not agree with her arguments, she is possibly one of the most misrepresented writers of our time. Direct and harsh on the surface, but if you think she's a twisted individual, open your eyes - this philosophy is echoed in centuries of literature. There can be nothing individual about that.
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20 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not exactly Jilly Cooper..., 17 Nov. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
This is the only book I've ever started reading and not been able to finish, simply because I found it so upsetting, disturbing, and depressing. Dworkin is often accused of rhetorical excess, but it is precisely this very explicit rhetoric which makes her arguments so compelling and elegant. Her writing is not merely factual, it is artistic and journalistic. She points a searchlight onto the world of pornography and finds the hatred, violence, and misogyny that dominates the masculine sexuality which men are forced into accepting. It is a call to arms to men as much as women, to escape the shackles of their own sexual oppression. Maybe I'll be able to finish the book one day...but in the mean time it's only served to reinforce my disgust and fear of pornography.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An important book, 26 Oct. 2010
This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
I loved this book and think that everyone should read it, unfortunately considering the general opinion of Andrea Dworkin as a man hating extremist her words would only be misunderstood and twisted like they usually are. It is terrible that things are this way, her work and message is too important to be dismissed. I think that she was reviled because she was too honest about things that thrive on lies. Andrea is eerily accurate when describing how men are and how they see women. In this book she reveals what pornography truly is and means by delving into the history of societys views of female and male sexuality, leaving the reader to make up their own mind.
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19 of 35 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Compelling, uncompromising, life-changing classic., 28 April 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
We all know how easy it is to distort an individual's views by printing a few striking quotes divorced from their context within the argument as a whole. Only the most ignorant and/or malicious of readers could take from this book the message that Andrea Dworkin 'hates men'. In fact, in chapter two she offers a persuasive constructionist account of the destructive, woman-hating gender identity that is foisted upon male individuals. Here's a good quote: 'How does it happen that the male child whose sense of life is so vivid that he imparts humanity to sun and stone changes into the adult male who cannot grant or even imagine the common humanity of women?'Andrea Dworkin has the guts to ask the questions that most men would rather not hear. It's about time they got some intelligent answers, instead of the usual stream of lazy, cliched masculinist drivel.
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35 of 66 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars ACADEMIC INTEREST ONLY, 26 Dec. 2003
By 
Mr. Robert J. Evans "Rob Evans" (Surrey, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
‘Pornography – Men Possessing Women’ is one of the most famous works of anti-pornography feminism. In it the author attempts to demonstrate that not only is the manufacture of pornography a form of violence against women, but also that pornography itself, as a concept is an act of violence against women.
‘Pornography…’ is at best misguided and at worst hysterical. The central argument of pornography equalling violence is derived from its being the graphic representation of male sexual dominance of women, created solely for the entertainment of men. This works only if we consider the author’s assumptions about sexuality as truth, and heir in lies the first problem.
Dworkin takes a long time to run through her stock-in-trade theory on male sexual dominance, but as in her other works, she fails to convince. The style of writing is highly emotional and full of rhetoric, what it lacks though is credibility. Pornography is described as ‘Dachau brought into the bedroom and celebrated’ and pornographers as equivalent to the Nazis. I found this not only grossly offensive to the memories of Holocaust victims, who have their suffering cheapened, but ludicrous in the extreme. Rape, and violence in general, are also similarly cheapened, rendering them meaningless.
The ‘one size fits all’ mentality (some men are bad therefore all men are bad) is simplistic and self-evidently untenable regardless of the high technical quality of the writing. I would also argue that it is contrived. During the book there are moments when women are seen to be sexually powerful. However, the author is very quick to neutralise this apparent power and return the woman in question to a position of victim hood. Women are simply not allowed to have power. On a different note, there are obvious allusions to serial child killer Ian Brady although he is never mentioned by name. At no point does she ever mention his female accomplice Myra Hindley. The reference made is to a killer (singular). It would not suit to have a woman involved in child killing. It just would not fit the theory.
The second problem is that there is little to actually back up the argument about the nature of pornography itself. The author relies on very selective evidence to back up her claims. The examples of pornography studied in depth are of the variety that obviously puts women in a position of subservience. Pornography, were women are put on an even footing with their male counterparts is conspicuous by its absence. Female dominance is certainly ignored, with the brief exception of a reference to male masochism, where male submission is turned into male dominance by proxy. This does not come as a surprise. Curiously though, she seems to revel in the most graphic descriptions of the sex on display.
Hard evidence of actual physical abuse in the porn industry is to all intents and purposes non-existent. This is strange. I would have expected that the allegations made by Linda Lovelace and the handful of other women who have publicly claimed abuse would have been central. Instead, the arguments remain theoretical and the perceived abuse intangible. I strongly suspect in the first instance that the sheer lack of mass accusation would have thrown her argument out of the window. Some women may well have suffered abuse in the porn industry, but many evidently did not and moved on into production in their later years. In the second instance the theoretical argument of pornography equalling violence was the obvious option because it could be argued against but not actually dismissed with hard evidence.
Looking back from 2003, ‘Pornography…’ is dated. This is to be expected of course, but when the modern porn industry is looked at in the context of this book, its argument finally collapses like a house of cards. We live in an age, where women are fast becoming the prime movers in the porn industry and increasingly able to control their own product. We also live in an age where young hopefuls are practically battering down the doors of the porn manufacturers in California – at their own free will. Pornographers are increasingly aware that the gender demographics of their industry have changed and that a large chunk of their market is now female. The co-proprietor of a major fetish website in the US recently went on national television in the UK and stated that getting on for half of his, and his wife’s subscribers were women. Ironically, this is probably a result of changing sexual identities brought on by decades of feminism. According to Dworkin though, fetishism is a male preserve.
There have been and no doubt still are women abused by pornographers around the world. This does not make pornography itself an act of violence though. Neither does it mean that the production of pornography is inherently abusive. It simply highlights the need to regulation, as is found for example, in the USA. It is all in how it is made.
There is a very telling entry in an extract of the article ‘On the writing of Pornography: Men Possessing Women’, (appearing at the end of the book) which sums up the author’s approach perfectly. In this she tells in emotive terms of how of her friends’ nerves could not even stand the glimpses they got of the pornographic source material she was researching for the book. On reading this I could only conclude that this was at best, a matter of emotional hypersensitivity, and at worst, a cynical attempt at making this material out to be far worse than it actually was. Either way, it did her argument no favours.
‘Pornography…’ is primarily redundant and should be read for academic interest only.
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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars One Star, 20 Jan. 2015
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This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
Dreadful book
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0 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars omg, that was really bad..., 29 Dec. 2013
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This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
... I really mean it. This book is disaster,especially last few pages where she writes about preganancy. I have to read this book because of my study but it's so hatefull - to men and to women. The author explains everything just as it fits to her ideology...
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1 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Pornography: Men Possessing Women, 10 Oct. 2014
By 
Mr. A. Baron "a_baron" (England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Pornography: Men Possessing Women (Paperback)
The title of this book says it all, the entire work can be summed up in two words: false narrative. Or if that is too prolix, one: lies.

In the "Preface", pornography is defined as involving dominance and violence as distinct from erotica which is simply "high-class pornography". This is complete rubbish, of course, as is her reference on page 13 to a "male-supremacist ideology".

Pornography is an enormous subject, and is not one that can be addressed with twee questions like is it harmful, yes or no? By way of analogy, when asked if crime is desirable, most people will answer no, but serial murder is crime, so is two foreigners drinking home brewed beer in Saudi Arabia. When asked about the desirability or otherwise of crime, most people think of neither, instead they are more likely to think about having their cars or houses broken into, or being robbed on their way home at night.

Similarly, pornography includes paintings, drawings, dirty jokes and a whole lot more. Some people of a sensitive disposition would regard the language Dworkin uses in this book as pornographic, in particular her repeated use of the dreaded F word. And is this really all about male supremacism? What about queer porn? Heck, what about lesbian porn? Perhaps the latter counts only when men view girl-on-girl action and not when "wimmin" do?

Dworkin give the rules of male power in this book - read her rules of male power. She makes a big thing out of a cartoon called BEAVER-HUNTERS which she says is a celebration of male power. Or couldn't it simply be a terrible pun?

She has a chapter on the Marquis de Sade: "In his life he tortured and raped women. He was a batterer, rapist, kidnapper, and child abuser".

Sade was indeed a horrible person; he also spent over three decades of his 74 years deprived of his freedom, which does tend to suggest that some men disapproved of his actions. On page 76, Dworkin points out that his wife participated in some of his sadistic acts. Was she too a male supremacist? Did she not have free will?

Then on page 103 we have what "feminists" love most, contrived statistics: "Using FBI statistics, feminists calculate that in the United States one woman is raped every three minutes, one wife battered every eighteen seconds". She puts the number of battered wives in the US at 28 million.

Does FBI stand for Federal Bureau of Investigation, or could it be in this case Feminist Bullshit ad Infinitum? Let's take a look at this. One rape every three minutes equals 175,200 rapes every year. That is regular years, not leap years. Does that sound credible to you? If it does not, loony "feminist" Kat Banyard claims there are currently at least 100,000 women raped in the UK every year - not rapes but victims. The UK has a much smaller population than the US, of course.

As for 28 million battered wives. In 1981 - when this book was published - the US population was around 230 million, which means if one accepts that figure, around 1 person in 8 in the US was "battered". Bearing in mind females make up around half the population, and that married women make up an even smaller percentage, almost every married woman in the US would be a battered wife. Does this sound plausible? And this relates to pornography how precisely?

Andrea Dworkin was a physically repulsive woman, gratuitously so, but even if she'd had the body of an angel, she would have been no less unattractive. How could anyone have ever taken this garbage seriously?
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