Customer Reviews


91 Reviews
5 star:
 (76)
4 star:
 (11)
3 star:
 (2)
2 star:
 (2)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Equal parts fascinating, chilling, and rage inducing
There were several occasions during this book when I had to put it down, simply because I was too angry to continue reading. The unthinking contempt that the News of the World, the Sun, and other newspapers displayed for privacy and the rule of law; the inappropriate political power wielded by Murdoch's papers over several British governments; the spineless refusal of the...
Published 2 months ago by C. Welhengama

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Britain's Watergate
I wasn't sure whether to buy this book as it appeared to be about the single topic of illegally listening to other people's voicemails which has already been exhaustively covered in the news however,after reading a couple of extracts I decided to buy the book.
Having read Hack Attack it is clear this hacking scandal is Britain's Watergate that reaches all the way up...
Published 2 months ago by R McIlwraith


‹ Previous | 1 210 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Equal parts fascinating, chilling, and rage inducing, 3 Aug 2014
By 
C. Welhengama (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
There were several occasions during this book when I had to put it down, simply because I was too angry to continue reading. The unthinking contempt that the News of the World, the Sun, and other newspapers displayed for privacy and the rule of law; the inappropriate political power wielded by Murdoch's papers over several British governments; the spineless refusal of the very same government ministers to stand up to Murdoch's empire; the casual complicity of Scotland Yard in the cover-up of the phone hacking scandal...

It is very difficult to get to the truth when those responsible for informing us, those responsible for protecting us, and those we've elected to govern us, collude together to deceive us. Nick Davies, Alan Rusbridger, and their colleagues at the Guardian deserve credit for exposing what appeared, on the surface, to be a phone-hacking scandal, but was actually, in Davies' words, a story about the abuse of power and about the secrets and lies that protect it.

Using what can only be described as relentless bulldog journalism, Davies and his colleagues uncover the truth. Its a fascinating account, and deserves to be read by everyone in the UK who has ever glanced at a newspaper, and probably in the rest of the world too.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


22 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Highlander here who avidly read this book in a ..., 2 Aug 2014
This review is from: Hack Attack: How the truth caught up with Rupert Murdoch (Hardcover)
Another Highlander here who avidly read this book in a day.

I followed this story in the Guardian from the beginning, incredulous that the rest of the media were so quiet, so craven. I expected the story to explode much earlier but it took the Millie Dowler revelations to make that happen. I won't give it away, but the manner in which the hacking of the phones of murder victims and their relatives is stumbled upon is one of the many places where you get to cheer on the hotch potch alliance that chipped away at the lies and obfuscation of the elite. In other places my jaw could not drop far enough at the sheer arrogance of News Corp, Scotland Yard the PPC and the DPP,

If you think you know this story already, take it from me, you don't.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 16 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read and weep, 1 Aug 2014
By 
Fell Off Me Chair (Angleterre, Royaume-Uni) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Hack Attack: How the truth caught up with Rupert Murdoch (Hardcover)
Nick Davies got his Watergate-style scoop; now we as a people owe it to him to follow this through and see that everyone involved in the perpetration of hacking and the obfuscation that followed are brought to book. I mean those at the top of NI/News UK. I mean the police. Read this jaw-dropping account and rage against the arrogance of those who think they can pervert our culture and lie with impunity. Unputdownable.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Journalism's squandered moral capital partially regained..., 28 Aug 2014
What can I say about this book? This country is full of people who will never know the debt they owe this gentleman and his editor for at least partially and probably only temporarily, putting a brake on these people’s revoltingly arrogant exercise of power. Before I read this book, I believed I knew roughly what went on. I didn’t. Certain general assumptions, so fundamental I barely knew I had them, were burned to the ground by this book. The police force basically works (not this time); democratically-elected politicians experience pressure from the tabloids but can basically stand up to it and the papers have little effect on an elected government’s agenda (nonsense – prison ships?!!); fleet street newspapers, not just the one’s I read, will generally report the truth (not true – see the printed press silence which the NoTW employment tribunal case is greeted with). It terms of its emotional impact I find it hard to summarise. I thought it would be an elevating and enjoyable experience reading this book – a bit like watching “All The President’s Men” with Robert Redford. There is that in there, but actually I felt scared. It all, so often, hung by a thread, kept barely intact by two isolated men. Another tidal wave of dishonest denials, another spin campaign. For different people, no doubt, different details will stand out as a kind of crystallising summary. For me so many do. The hacking victim’s lawyers religiously removing the batteries from their mobile phones when they met; the Channel 4 documentary staff finding their phones had been interfered with; a guest at a party warning Simon Kelner (editor of the Independent) that he needed to be careful about his phone and him confidently ringing his voicemail to reassure the guest, only to find the PIN no longer worked; the author and Alan Rusbridger, the Guardian editor, discussing what aspect of their past private lives might appear in the tabloids in retaliation; the unsolved murder of Daniel Morgan and the anti-corruption police intercepting vans following the lead police investigator, only to find they contain an NoTW photographer looking for dirt on him (they thought he might be having an affair, they said – with his own wife). But if I had to pick one, it would be the response to the Independent’s pre-election advert: “Rupert Murdoch won’t decide this election. You will.” James Murdoch and Rebecca Brooks burst into his office immediately following publication. Mr M calling him a “f***ing f***wit”, Mrs Brooks saying: “We thought you were our friend”.

I guess with gangsters the levers are different, dead bodies in the river etc. Here there is only one in the background. Generally, they do people over publicly, and virtually as effectively. It is a good story, a truly gripping page-turner from beginning to end. But it is also a horror story, about democracy gone awry.

Finally, regarding the ex-NoTW journalist who reviewed the book below, Mr Coulson is not paying for “everyone’s sins”. He is paying for his own.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Beware the return of 'The Beast', 5 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Hack Attack: How the truth caught up with Rupert Murdoch (Kindle for iPad Edition)
The double column format allowed this well written book to be an easy read, page turner racing to a climax it has. The photos of the criminally guilty, the victims, the compliant, and the involved elite are able to be expanded and of good quality.
.... And the content... A breathtaking exposure of the corrupt linkage between wealth, corporate power, purblind police and deferential politicians... Echoing throughout is the fact that whilst 'we' have one more vote than Rupert Murdoch in any UK election he has the media power to set the tone of political debate for millions... Nick Davies has stirred up this hornets nest but makes it clear the nest remains and combined 'they' retain the capacity to sting who and when they want...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clarity through a complex maze, 6 Aug 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As compelling as 'All The President's Men', as thrilling as 'Defence of the Realm'. A superb account of a six-year campaign of investigative journalism that shines a light into the darkest corners of media practice, corporate power, law-enforcement compromise and government compliance. It's an incredibly complex story which Davies navigates with considerable clarity - and provides an x-ray of what lies beneath the daily headlines.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fascinating, disturbing and important, 4 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A fascinating and disturbing book. Nick Davies' exposure of tabloid criminality is vital reading for anyone interested in the threat posed to democracy by the pursuit of unbridled media power. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The battle's won but not the war..., 23 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
A gripping read from start to finish. Even though we may think we may know much of the story, Nick Davies's account fills in many gaps - but occasionally you do feel he was unable to write exactly what he wanted to...Going through endless litigation is nerve-wracking at the best of times and to Davies's credit, he plays down what must have been some stomach-churning times for him personally. Without giving anything away, the Murdochs and their shabby empire did not take the attack from this particular dogged hack without a massive, no-holds-barred fightback that lasted for years. There are strong parallels between the events surrounding the Murdochs and the banking collapse: the same hugely-inflated egos, particularly from the likes of the amoral James Murdoch; the fawning over of the Murdochs by a roll-call of top politicians, the lack of coverage of the scandal by a cowering media; the relentless numbers of police officers, (and some civil servants) who would hawk their grandmothers' souls for a wadge; a complete lack of accountability by News International to anyone ever; the levels to which the News of the World would stoop week after week as it felled yet another hapless victim to drive profits and, more prosaically, if you were running the news-desk, your bonus; and by far the most insidious and dangerous of all, the ways in which the Murdoch gang set about trying to influence and interfere with government policies on crime, the NHS, competition laws and tax to name but a few. As an MP commented: 'We are all, in our own way, scared of the Rebekah Brookses of this world...' Quite.

And despite everything, or perhaps because so many are still scared of them, the Murdochs, phoenix-like, have risen again: the share price is up and their empire expands inexorably onwards and outwards across the world as if the hacking scandal had barely happened. But well done, Nick Davies, Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger and your (often brave) sources. However bad it might be again, it would be a whole lot worse had you not attacked the castle gates. Highly recommended.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More Nick Davies Please., 7 Aug 2014
As an ex News Of The World reporter I enjoyed Nicks book. It filled in the gaps - such as the mystery around Ian Edmondson who I assumed had been paid off. I like the description that he was 'tossed over the wall.' Id love to read his memoirs.
A lot of money was spent on the trial yet only a scapegoat Andy C was sent to prison. I winced at the descriptions of poor Neville - he's a really lovely guy and a great journalist. Greg Miskiw came out badly, 'no morals and a lad' and shame as he was a really good journalist before the 'trick' was introduced by an unscrupulous individual greedy for money who repeats the lies he was doing it all (not for the money) but because he was in cahoots with MI6. Yes MI6 love getting in bed with scum who hack dead kiddies! Greg became enamored by the 02 blagging and that was his ruin. Blagging mobile phone companies is a 'script' a five year old could do and not material for a whole book. Nick's book however is about politics. . I was in the book under the code name York. It wasn't that I couldn't come up with anything valuable it is just hard to betray ones former colleagues as I have written in my own book on it. 'How Nick Davies Hired Me To Spy On My Former Colleagues.' I was on the Milly Dowler (so called investigation) and we were NOT on the side of the cops it was a race to try and beat the cops. I wanted a movie for my book but Nick got the Clooney deal. Nice going and couldn't happen to a better man.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars having read very good reviews in both the Telegraph and the Guardian, 25 Aug 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this book in hardback for my son, having read very good reviews in both the Telegraph and the Guardian. I started to dip into it and before long I was hooked and had to buy a copy of my own. I had followed the hacking scandal closely and thought I knew a lot about it, but actually I knew very little. This book is fantastic at bringing a very complicated story together and filling in the gaps. The disgraceful criminal behaviour of the Murdoch press, the appalling way that the police did nothing for years to bring them to account and the sycophantic cowardice of our politicians, left me feeling shocked and very angry. And how dare one family rubbish the BBC, just for their own financial gain. I hope this book will be very widely read. Interesting that there is no review of it that I can find on the Times database. I wonder why.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 210 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Hack Attack: How the truth caught up with Rupert Murdoch
Hack Attack: How the truth caught up with Rupert Murdoch by Nick Davies (Hardcover - 31 July 2014)
£13.60
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews