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on 15 December 2015
As he goes through his day, Fernandez looks at ordinary events and concocts mathematical explanations for what happens. Everything from the cooling of hot beverages in the morning to the rate of the transmission of the common cold to estimating wait times when a train is stalled are examined and explained using calculus. I counted over 30 subtitles in the TOC, so the breadth of topics is considerable.
To his credit, Fernandez pulls no formulaic punches in his descriptions: when a differential or integral is needed he uses it, no matter how complex. This is very refreshing. One thing that I find annoying about math books is when the author exhibits a case of “equation shyness,” an unwillingness to include equations in the text for fear of turning off readers (and reducing royalties). Yet, the topic being explained cannot be fully understood any way other than with the use of one or more equations.
If you are a math teacher looking for some everyday phenomena that are explained using calculus to liven up your course, then this is the book for you. There are many selections; you will have no trouble finding something you can use. If you are looking for a good math book, (with math included), then this one will certainly work for you.

This book was made available for free for review purposes
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on 15 April 2014
This is how books in science should be written. You can learn what calculus is about in the dash board of a car. Instant speed of the car is differentiation .The total miles covered is integration.

siva
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on 21 February 2015
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