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on 16 December 2012
A must for anyone who is interested in the animals which live around our coast. Suddenly a seal is transformed into either a common or a grey seal, a fin seen in the distance becomes a porpoise, a white sided dolphin or a minke whale. I would also suggest this book to any diver or snorkeller as it is really helpful for the animals we encounter on a regular basis.

Nicely written, excellent illustrations and a good book.
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on 31 December 2012
Not knowing my Pilots from my Humpbacks, I bought this hoping for a little help in identifying cetaceans. Mission accomplished there - the illustrations and behavioural descriptions are fantastic, I shouldn't have any problems now.

I like the general layout of the book, it's easy to navigate to something specific or you can even open it to a rough position and from there know whether to flick forward or back to find what you want - it should be quick/easy to use in whale-spotting-panic!

From a physical point of view, it's a handy size of book (A5-ish) and the cover is a tough wearing plastic. So, carrying it around with you will neither do it any harm nor will you be over encumbured by it's weight.

If you live near a coast and want an idea of what's out there or are specifically going in search of sea mammals - I would happily recommend you add this book to your basket now or at least pop it on a wishlist!
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on 4 February 2013
What a handy sized, brilliant book, stuffed full to bursting with images, facts and useful pointers including regulations. Great book ideal for those walking coastal paths, with an interest in these subjects and also a handy support book for the photographer of these mammals. Highly recommend.
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on 5 January 2013
This is a great addition to the 'WildGuides' series of identification guides written by people who know their stuff and with some superb photographs. Everyone with an interest in marine mammals in Britain whether you live here or intend to visit someday should include a copy of this guide on their book list. Like the other guides in this series it's a handy one to carry in your rucksack, or keep in the glove compartment of your car. You never know where one of our 'blubbery' (or furry) marine animals will pop up around our shores!
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on 10 January 2013
clear and concise without over use of jargon, and stunning photography! would recommend this book to any nature enthuasiast of any age.
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on 9 January 2013
Bought this for my wife, for Christmas, as she is a keen amature naturalist; we live in Shetland, so much of this book is extemely relevant to our locale. It would also make a very good reference book, as well as a field tool, for anyone interested in seals, porpoises, dolphins & whales wherever they live.
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on 23 January 2013
I was lucky enough to see dolphins in Cardigan Bay last year, I wish I'd had this guide with me then I would have been able to identify them. I read this book from cover to cover and I haven't been near the coast yet. It will be permanently kept in my camper van for my frequent coastal trips in future.
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on 4 June 2013
"Britain's Sea Mammals" by Jon Dunn is not just nicely presented and decorated with lovely photos, it is also the perfect choice to take on any sea trip. Thanks to its plastic cover it won't even get wet.
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on 21 February 2013
Beautifully put together, definative reference note and field guide produced by truly passionate authors. Highly recommended to the casual observer right up to the obsessive cetacean twitcher!
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on 21 December 2012
The first cetacean I ever saw was probably a harbour porpoise off the coast of Argyll - although I thought it was a dolphin. And the first whale I saw, which surfaced in a raft of Manx shearwaters off the north coast of Rhum, was probably a minke whale - although I thought it was a pilot whale.

The fact that these memories are still quite sharp in my memory after several decades tells me something of the fascination that such marine mammals have for me, and probably for you.

The fact that I was guessing as to the identity of what I had seen tells me that there are plenty of us who have been waiting for this book - which I think is an excellent one.

This is not just a field guide - though it is a very good guide to cetaceans and seals in the field - but this book tells you about where to go, when to go and quite a lot about the ecology and conservation of the species that you might see.

I now know what the following words mean: lobbing, chorus lining and bottling.

Seals are fun, but cetaceans are a treat. Seals sit on the shore looking like bananas but cetaceans swim past and always seem, to me at least, wild and wonderful. I'm looking forward to spending more time gazing out to sea with this book close at hand. Now I'll have a much better chance of knowing what I'm looking at.
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