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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intergenerational equity: protectingour children's future.
This timely book explores all aspects of sustainability: economic, environmental and social. The underlying theme pursued throughout the book is that economic growth, whilst bringing significant benefits to society, can no longer continue in its present form. Indeed, by ignoring social and natural limits, it has become unsustainable. The Economics of Enough is a...
Published on 10 July 2012 by Mr. M. J. Roarty

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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing - A shallowly researched and opinionated presentation of one author's viewpoint
Don't be fooled by the fancy cover and inner sleeve reviews. This book is surprisingly disappointing.

It is difficult to read because of the author's style. She writes in an opinionated right-wing voice, in poorly structured repetitive chapters, cherry picking evidence to draw her preconceived conclusions and often making judgements with no evidence at all...
Published 18 months ago by C. McAlister


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Intergenerational equity: protectingour children's future., 10 July 2012
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This timely book explores all aspects of sustainability: economic, environmental and social. The underlying theme pursued throughout the book is that economic growth, whilst bringing significant benefits to society, can no longer continue in its present form. Indeed, by ignoring social and natural limits, it has become unsustainable. The Economics of Enough is a devastating critique of recent economic policymaking that has been driven by political parties prepared to win votes by offering short-term solutions to long-term problems.

The book carefully reviews a vast literature relating to current multiple crises concerning our deteriorating environment, growing social inequality and the mounting burden of public debt. In providing an overarching critique of the most important debates affecting Government policy on what are the critical issues of our time, the Economics of Enough draws upon all the main disciplines of the social sciences and distills the latest evidence from academic research. The enquiry ranges from the study of happiness (psychology) to the trend of growing social inequality(sociology); from the depletion of natural capital (environmental economics)to the burgeoning problem of debt(political economy).

An ambitious and bold study which should become compulsory reading for all politicians, particularly the deficit deniers. By cutting through the ill-considered and sterile arguments of populist politicians, short-term fixes are banished in favour of long-term, sustainable solutions. In this context, the current political debate about growth versus austerity offers a false prospectus; in the West, we have reached the limits of debt-fuelled growth which has turned out to be a mirage, its proponents morally as well as economically bankrupt. Sustainability dictates a new approach based on rebalancing the economy and an end to public excess. To be fair to our children and the environment, long-term policies must be carefully devised to manage all our resources and ensure that future prosperity is not mortgaged to solve existing problems.

In the second part of the book, a radical re-assesment of the values and institutions is made, outlining the challenges that must be confronted to build a sustainable economy. In the final chapter a manifesto for achieving this is set out. The Economics of Enough argues that these challenges can be met, providing a hopeful message for ending the perpetual crisis that seems to have engulfed Governments in the West. For this reason, Diane Coyle's study offers a welcome and relevant critique of the current crisis.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Economics of Enough, 10 July 2012
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Rolf Dobelli "getAbstract" (Switzerland) - See all my reviews
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Economist Diane Coyle argues that the 2007-2008 financial crisis was not an isolated event but a symptom of greater issues in the global economy. The forces driving these issues include social progress, climate change and technology, particularly the shift to a knowledge- and service-based economy. In this impressive, strikingly honest book, Coyle works hard to avoid clichéd binaries (left versus right, market versus government) and to base her analysis on research and observation. Some of her insights are useful, and her section on measurement is nicely original. However, her overall call for action is not as fresh, practical or persuasive as her analysis of the problems at hand. Nonetheless, getAbstract recommends this earnest work of economic inquiry to executives, policy makers and all those who believe that having an ethical society remains a viable goal.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A good read, 10 May 2014
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More enjoyable than a lot of economics books. But that inevitably means being more opinionated.

Though I did not always agree with Coyle, he makes coherent arguments. And I read more than I expected to be be honest. That is why I think it deserves four stars.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing - A shallowly researched and opinionated presentation of one author's viewpoint, 7 Jan 2013
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C. McAlister (Spain/UK) - See all my reviews
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Don't be fooled by the fancy cover and inner sleeve reviews. This book is surprisingly disappointing.

It is difficult to read because of the author's style. She writes in an opinionated right-wing voice, in poorly structured repetitive chapters, cherry picking evidence to draw her preconceived conclusions and often making judgements with no evidence at all. For example, in chapter 2 she says:
"...there is an off-putting air of smugness in some of this recession-chic literature. Much of it is written by people who are themselves well off by any standard, and yet they obviously get great satisfaction from circumstances that mean many people are struggling to make ends meet. It's as if homespun is morally superior to something bought for money."
She intersperses her discussions with rather pointless photos, instead of well analysed charts as other authors in this area do, and comes across with the idea that her view and analysis is the "proper" one. There are big holes in most of the chapters - the arguments are oversimplified and biaised toward the author's opinion.
For a more balanced and scientifically informed discussion in this area I recommend Tim Jackson's book - "Prosperity without Growth: Economics for a Finite Planet"
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The Economics of Enough: How to Run the Economy as If the Future Matters
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