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How Round Is Your Circle?: Where Engineering and Mathematics Meet
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
This book does what it claims and bridges the boundry between Mathematics and Enginering. It has some insights into how various linkages work, why rollers don't need to be round, how to make a ruler, how to draw a straight line and of course how round is your circle. The book looks at historical attempts to solve these problems and the various inventions that were produced along the way. Slide rules are explained in depth and if you've an old set of calipers with a vernier it explains how to use them.

For those who are more practical, many of the mechanisms can be made and there are photos in the centre section of the book

I bought this book specifically to learn more about the Peaucellier's linkage but found the other chapters facinating too.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 18 March 2013
As an engineer, a lot of mathematics has been a bit of a mystery to me. As this book explains, in engineering there are no irrational numbers because engineers work in approximations. That is one of the biggest differences between engineering and mathematics, but the book also gives a big insight into some of the mathematical roots of engineering tools and techniques.

The chapter on planimeters was a bit hard going for me, but that's because I never did well at maths! There are a few sentences throughout the book that start "Clearly," or "Obviously," and what follows is far from that! But again, anyone with a reasonable level of maths won't have any problems.

There are also many interesting things to make, such as linkages and devices to demonstrate Pythagoras' Theorem. A very interesting and informative book and well worth reading by both mathematicians and engineers.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 16 March 2014
Being a mechanical engineer myself, I'm fascinated about geometry and its application on kinematics of mechanisms, which is what this book is specialized at. The examples are amazing and the book is a good option of entertainment, specially if you're after something different.
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on 24 May 2015
Recommended to me on yahoo groups.
A fantastically interesting book if you are interested in Engineering and Mathematics.
Euclid is now my new hero!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 2 October 2014
excellent
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