Customer Reviews


3 Reviews
5 star:
 (2)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Critique of Religion and Philosophy, Walter Kaufmann.
Dr. Kaufmann's humbition (his coinage for humility and ambition) to make people see "beyond black and white" is beautifully revealed in all his books including the "Critique of Religion and Philosophy". He explains how theology is dying despite its desperate measures to incorporate the philosophy of different ages from Aristotle to Heidegger in its...
Published on 31 Dec 1997

versus
2 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ?
"A learned twaddler who at the bottom knows nothing can seldom be got to deal with anything concrete; he does not talk of a particular dialogue of Plato, that is too little for him-also it might become apparent that {he had not read it.} No, he talks about Plato as a whole, or even Greek philosophy as a whole, but especially about the wisdom of the Indians and...
Published on 2 Jun 1999


Most Helpful First | Newest First

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Critique of Religion and Philosophy, Walter Kaufmann., 31 Dec 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Critique of Religion and Philosophy (Paperback)
Dr. Kaufmann's humbition (his coinage for humility and ambition) to make people see "beyond black and white" is beautifully revealed in all his books including the "Critique of Religion and Philosophy". He explains how theology is dying despite its desperate measures to incorporate the philosophy of different ages from Aristotle to Heidegger in its Procrustean exegesis of the bible. He sheds light on veils of truth - subjective and objective -, the difference between truth and correctness, and belief and atheism to lay bare the complacent simple mindedness of such classifications. The concept of great philosophy has been shown to exist between analysis and existentialism, poetry and science, and a few philosophers' total disregard for psychology and a psychologist's over-interpretation. He compares various religions and scriptures for their humane, authoritarian, poetic and moral aspects, hints at Greek tragedy and shows what timeless appeal there is in their Weltanschauungs "to man's ontological interest." The author of this book, dares his readers to read well, and to reread; to think, and to rethink, more openly and vigorously. He aptly called himself "a disciple of the sarcastic Socrates."
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Read this book, 8 July 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Critique of Religion and Philosophy (Paperback)
This is my favorite book, fiction or nonfiction, ever. It is an explicit and captivating critique that is both detailed and highly readable. This book is one of the few philosophical books that I have ever read that actually made me laugh. A well crafted and beautiful piece of work. It demonstrates not only the limits of religion/theology but the limits of philosophy as well. I will read this book again and again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 40 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars ?, 2 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Critique of Religion and Philosophy (Paperback)
"A learned twaddler who at the bottom knows nothing can seldom be got to deal with anything concrete; he does not talk of a particular dialogue of Plato, that is too little for him-also it might become apparent that {he had not read it.} No, he talks about Plato as a whole, or even Greek philosophy as a whole, but especially about the wisdom of the Indians and the Chinese. This Greek philosophy as a whole, the profundity of Oriental philosophy as a whole is the prodigiously great, the boundless, which advantageously hides his ignorance. So it is much easier to talk about an alteration in the forum of government than discuss a very little concrete problem like sewing a pair of shoes, and the injustice towards a few capable men lies in the fact that by reason of the prodigious greatness of the problem they are apparently an par with every peer, who "also speaks out" {So it is much easier for a dunce to criticize our Lord than to judge the handiwork of the apprentice in a shop, yea, than to judge a sulfur match.} For if only the problem is concrete, he will, it is soon to be hoped, soon betray how stupid he is. {But our Lord and his Governance of the world is something so prodigiously great that in a certain giddy abstract sense the most foolish man takes part in gossiping about it as well as the wisest man, because no one understands it."} Kierkegaard (A&R 31-32)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Critique of Religion and Philosophy
Critique of Religion and Philosophy by Walter Kaufmann (Paperback - 21 April 1979)
19.07
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews