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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A grand story told in stately fashion
Keats made it famous, but few today read George Chapman's masterful translation of the Iliad. It is to be hoped that this Princeton edition will make this elegant translation more accessible. As in the works of Shakespeare, the archaic brand of English utilized by Chapman takes some getting used to. It is well worth the effort, however. This translation has a...
Published on 4 July 1999

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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad glossary makes this otherwise fine edition useless
Chapman's 1611 translation of Homer is probably the best that's been done into English, and this edition is well designed and printed. BUT Chapman can't be read without a glossary -- he invented literally hundreds of words and has special meanings for hundreds more. The academic num-nums that put this stupid Bollingen edition together gave absolutely no indication in...
Published on 30 July 1999


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A grand story told in stately fashion, 4 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Chapman's Homer: The "Iliad": 1 (Bollingen Series (General)) (Paperback)
Keats made it famous, but few today read George Chapman's masterful translation of the Iliad. It is to be hoped that this Princeton edition will make this elegant translation more accessible. As in the works of Shakespeare, the archaic brand of English utilized by Chapman takes some getting used to. It is well worth the effort, however. This translation has a music and vitality missing from many later efforts. The introduction to this edition gets it right in advising readers to move fast through the text. It will prove surprisingly easy to comprehend if one avoids slogging through, and though many of the words are oddly spelled, their pronunciation is the same as in contemporary English. Highly recommended.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Translation Like a Strange Island, 27 Aug. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Chapman's Homer: The "Iliad": 1 (Bollingen Series (General)) (Paperback)
Chapman wrote this translation after being shipwrecked (he had sailed with Drake to pirate the southern ocean) on an isle, perhaps Calypso's Isle. Certainly it was an isle with inspiration equal to the fair goddess. Part of the translation was written on the sand, part in a grotto, part in a garden by a clear-running river. Clearly there is much sunlight in the translation but also the beauty of a goddess and a rich garden. Queen Elizabeth I got angry with him for taking too much time (and, perhaps, pleasure); recalled him; and he sailed a raft back to London. Buy this hyperion leopard of a translation before it disappears again.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wonderful, elegant and well worth reviving., 1 Sept. 2000
By 
Michael Fingal O'Flaherty Brett (North London United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Chapman's Homer: The "Iliad": 1 (Bollingen Series (General)) (Paperback)
This is a wonderful book whose scenes will be in your imagination forever, as will many of its vivid passages and phrases. No praise is too much for this book.This is a book to be carried everywhere. This is a random example:
Praise of Homer
That he to his unmeasur'd mightie Acts, Might adde a Fame as vast; and their extracts In fires as bright, as endlesse as the starres... He at Joves Table set, fills out to us, Cups that repair Age, sad and ruinous; And gives it Built, of an Eternall stand With his all-sinewie Odyssean hand. Shifts Time and Fate; puts Death in Lifes free state; And Life doth into ages propogate..........
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Bad glossary makes this otherwise fine edition useless, 30 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Chapman's Homer: The "Iliad": 1 (Bollingen Series (General)) (Paperback)
Chapman's 1611 translation of Homer is probably the best that's been done into English, and this edition is well designed and printed. BUT Chapman can't be read without a glossary -- he invented literally hundreds of words and has special meanings for hundreds more. The academic num-nums that put this stupid Bollingen edition together gave absolutely no indication in 600 pages of text as to which words are defined in the glossary -- not a footnote, not an asterisk, nothing. Your choice is to look up virtually every one of the hundreds of thousands of words of text to see if it's in the glossary, or just to read blindly on knowing that you're probably missing 50 percent of the meaning of the text. Someone should have lost their job over this piece of university nonsense.
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