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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Computer mediated interaction from a psychological view.
This is quite heavy reading. After all, it is a researcher who has written it, and it shows (for instance, about one seventh of the book is notes). It took a while to get into, and even then it happened that I lost track when there were too much psychological references (I did better with the philosophical ones and, of course, with all the computer science stuff). So,...
Published on 26 Mar. 2001

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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The continuation of a fallacy.
Turkle's book is a good read, but can not be taken as authorative. She seems to have fallen into the same trap as most of the online researchers do. Turkle expresses her findings as though they come from a similar group of online people. The Internet is filled with various groups and ideologies. Cross-cultural comparison is fine, but considering everyone online as the...
Published on 22 Mar. 1999


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Computer mediated interaction from a psychological view., 26 Mar. 2001
By A Customer
This is quite heavy reading. After all, it is a researcher who has written it, and it shows (for instance, about one seventh of the book is notes). It took a while to get into, and even then it happened that I lost track when there were too much psychological references (I did better with the philosophical ones and, of course, with all the computer science stuff). So, what is this book about? It focuses on the human side of Human-Computer Interaction and Computer Mediated Communication (by email, IRC, web-chats, MUDs and such). It addresses important and interesting questions like how ones own personality is affected if one on the net puts on another personality, or even another gender, and how ordinary people reacts to the question of artificial life - whether it is actually possible or not. Turkle shows that exploring and developing ones personality at the Internet can be both good and bad. Some people eases personal pains and overcome difficulties by experimenting with what they want to become, while others grew envious of the digital alter egos and are left feeling stuck in their real lifes. Very thought-provoking stuff! What I liked best, though, is that Turkle takes MUD and IRC dead seriously.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very interesting anecdotes, but no thesis, 10 Oct. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (Paperback)
Turkle's thesis seems to be that cyberspace encourages us to explore new identities--not very controversial. However, she does provide a lot of interesting stories about life on the internet and the book is very well-written. I use her Introduction to start off my class in technology and it generates a lot of discussion.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The continuation of a fallacy., 22 Mar. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (Paperback)
Turkle's book is a good read, but can not be taken as authorative. She seems to have fallen into the same trap as most of the online researchers do. Turkle expresses her findings as though they come from a similar group of online people. The Internet is filled with various groups and ideologies. Cross-cultural comparison is fine, but considering everyone online as the starting point for an argument is just asking for disaster. It is because of this that Sherry and many others like her have written books that are good for a read but useless academically.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great, well-grounded analysis, 12 Oct. 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (Paperback)
By grounding her observations in the lives of actual users, Trukle provides a unique, insightful look at "life on the screen," free from much of the usual hyperbole, speculation, and conjecture.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for anyone!, 23 Jun. 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (Paperback)
This text is quite outstanding. Turkle has produced an amazing integration of technology and sociology in this work. Using ethnography, Turkle distinquishes herself from many popular writers with her emphasis on listening to people explain how *they* make sense out of the net. Works such as this which are so careful in their claims and humanistic in scope are quite difficult to find. Snap up this text in softover, and learn about the ways in which we, in the electronic age, may be seen to live on, and through, the screen,

David J. Paterno
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2.0 out of 5 stars Sherry Turkle, 27 April 2013
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Sherry's TED talk of this title was so apt, succinct, amusing, clever. The book, however, was too academic for relaxed reading - a heavy read. Ideal for anyone doing serious study in the social effects of 'living' online and its impact on our behaviour
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5.0 out of 5 stars very good book, i recommend it to everybody, 5 Feb. 2009
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I read this book for one of my modules at university and i enjoyed it so much that i decided to buy it. It gives very clear explanations of modern societies and how we socialize on internet. very good, i recommend it.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An important anthropology of virtual life., 4 Jan. 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (Paperback)
This is a crucial read for those who are interested in the intersections of postmodern thinking about human subjectivity, the anthropology of the online world(s), and modern psychological understandings of identity and the human mind. Turkle is balanced and insightful, humble and well-read, and provides a welcome space for the reader to come to her own insights and epiphanies. The best book I've read in several years.
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4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars sporadically brilliant, 2 Mar. 2002
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Cole Davis (London) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (Paperback)
Once you get past the somewhat esoteric psychological analysis (and I speak as a psychologist), this book really takes off. The section on artificial intelligence is highly informative and entertaining, with an earlier section relating to user/programmer perspectives on computing also a valuable context-setter for those interested in cyberculture and computing.

Postscript (January 2014): This review was written some years ago. It is likely that this book will be rather dated by now.
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1 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Feet like fins, 21 Oct. 2002
This review is from: Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet (Paperback)
Who hasn't communicated with others via icq, or fc, or trillian these days? If you are one of these people, you have undoubtedly by now built up a retinue of contacts, but you will most probably only meet a couple of them, at best, face to face.
It's all about interaction, then. Nobody, anywhere describes the processes of interaction via our monitors, quite like Sherry Turkle. Her scalpel blade slices deftly and precisely into the meat of so-called 'cyber-anthropology' and leaves one grinning, like an idiot, with recognition.
"Yes! That's exactly how I feel!"
Keep it as a companion as you romp across the green grass, or negotiate the dark sewers of VL.
Superb in every way.
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Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet
Life on the Screen: Identity in the Age of the Internet by Sherry Turkle (Paperback - 1 Sept. 1997)
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