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on 19 September 2000
I enjoyed this book so much because of a number of reasons: -The characters are well depicted and their personalities develop though the novel. -The descriptions are rich and colourful. Especially interesting are the detailed descriptions of space crafts and planets, you would not say it was written in the 1930s, when the space era had not taken off yet. -Most important, it made me THINK about human nature, sometimes feeling ashamed of being human myself. Try this book. It is quite good actually and very quick to read.
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on 13 September 2009
In this, the first of Lewis' Cosmic Trilogy, three men travel - one unwillingly - to Malacandra (Mars), and there they encounter the different lifeforms of the planet. C.S. Lewis, ever the Christian Thinker/Apologist, explores the utopian possibilities of a world where very different intelligent life-forms live sympathetically side by side, each fulfilling its own special role and respecting others' differences.
The events and conversations expose and confront the 'bent' ways of a fallen earth: Thulcandra - the Silent Planet of the title, and challenge us with the idea of other, better ways.
Like all Lewis' narratives, the plotting is simple, and it is certainly not 'science' fiction; he addresses almost no scientific issues at all, unlike say, Jules Verne, who revelled in working out as much of the science as possible when he also took adventurers into other worlds.
Narnia for adults? Perhaps.
Lewis gives us, as always, a book of ideas intended to make us reflect, and he succeeds.
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Though not known as a sci fi writer, when he tried his hand at the genre he produced a first rate work: it has imagination and a grand chritianised scheme, vivid characters, and is full of surprises. This man had a great, moral imagination that resonates in this thoughtful work. This is literature, to which the best of sci-fi aspires.

Warmly recommended, even for those who do not love sci fi.
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on 20 October 1998
Five out of five is way to high -- the characters are plastic, the narrator has a set of annoying mental habits, and the odd descriptions of a truly odd world are often downright confusing. Three out of five is too low -- the book is original and often paints its colorful world with grace and style. (3.5?)
This book IS like Narnia -- a book of Christian ideas told in with almost adolescent simplicity. The reason you'll like it is because, occasionally, it hits home. And when it does, you realize that the world C.S. Lewis is painting, however simple, is one you would like to see more of.
If you need a quick idealistic reprieve from your modern world, give it a try.
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on 2 December 2012
[Throughout the years, I have written a number of reviews that have never been published online on Amazon. These writings comprise two types of reviews: unfinished reviews, abandoned during various stages of composition, and completed reviews that for life reasons were never posted. Of the later type, back in September 2001 I wrote a cache of work, a full sixteen reviews of several different C. S. Lewis books which have never been released. I am publishing these reviews now for the first time, over a decade after they were initially written. Mike London 10-3-2012]

Out of the Silent Planet, the first book in the Space Trilogy, stands as the most sci-fi of the three. While Perelandra stands more as a religious novel and That Hideous Strength as academic satire and anti utopian fiction, Out of the Silent Planet has the most common elements of the science fiction genre. The opening dedication also bears an interesting thought. The opening book is dedicated to Warren, Lewis's brother, who is "a life long critic of the space and time story." To the Inklings this was something of a pun, as this dedication had a dual meaning. In one sense, it is just the literal level, but in another, it means Warren is critical of the idea that all there is to the universe is space and time.

Lewis' main attack here is the idea of Weston of populating other worlds and eradicating those beings which are there, which is embodied in a very favourable light by Olaf Stapeldon in his novel First and Last Men. The mere thought of killing other sentient creatures, if they did indeed exist, to propitiate the human race was, to Lewis, a true monstrosity.

The astronomical distances were enacted by God as quarantines, and the worlds we could get to could not sustain life in the real universe. In Lewis's, both Mars and Venus can support life but Jupiter and Saturn cannot. However, Mars is dying and Perelandra is an unfallen world that will aid in the fight against the Bent One, or Satan. We also get a manifestation of what will occur if we allow greed to rule our lives with Devine, who is so far gone that the Oyarsa of Mars would unbody him if Devine was a Malacandrian native because the hnau is out of him and he is only on the level of the animal.

Again, this is a common theme in Lewis that evil, if followed to its extreme, will cause you to lose all of your humanity. One of the most effective scenes in the entire trilogy is the first meeting of the Ransom and the hrossa. It describes, very accurately, what it must be like to encounter an alien species for the first time. Both want to make contact, but both are rather nervous about it.

One major thing that interested me about Out of the Silent Planet was Ransom's continuous flight from the sorns. From the very beginning Ransom automatically assumes that the sorns wish him harm because of the conversation he overheard by Devine and Weston. From this, he begins his already constantly journeying life. Out of the Silent Planet is a composite of journeys, with Ransom journeying on a walking holiday across England, and then a journey to free Harry, then to Mars on the space ship. He escapes from Weston and Devine so they won't offer him to the sorns (which makes a very large part of Ransom's overall journey). Here he meets Hyoi and journeys with him to his home. Ransom from there journeys to hunt the hnakra, then to Augray's cave, and from there to Meldilorn and then to home. After all this, he ends up in the pub. This constant journeying also comes into play in the Narnia books. This journey also ties into the spiritual journeys that Lewis's characters' are experiencing ties into their own spiritual progression, which is most evident in The Pilgrim's Regress.

One of the most amazing things about this book to me is the fact that out of the 60 reviews it received on initial publication, which was a rather large number for a relatively unknown writer, which C. S. Lewis was at that time, only two noticed the Christian theology throughout the piece, which strikes me as very odd.

Lewis became convinced that you could smuggle any amount of theology into a person's mind if you simply called it romance and have done with it. Indeed, that is what the rest of his major fiction did, and almost all if it is successful. Where it becomes quite plain what Lewis is doing with Perelandra, but as it is so obviously the story of the unfallen Adam and Eve and their temptation on Perelandra it does not violate my own personal ascetic that I dealt with during the discussion of LWW. Part of the spell of that story is the fact that it is the Christian story retold, but this time with a happy ending.

The single greatest weakness with this book, however, is the length. While Perelandra could have benefited had he cut some of the more preachy sections at the end on the Holy Mountain, this book ends entirely too soon. We do not receive nearly enough exposure to the third race, and Meldilorn is reached to quickly. This is a tale that would have benefited the addition of about another one hundred pages, but sadly it does not. As it is the most science fiction of the three, Out of the Silent Planet is all the more disappointing in this facet. This is the only book of the Space Trilogy which reads like a traditional Wells fantasy, so it would have been much nicer had there been some more length. As it stands, however, Out of the Silent Planet is a good novel with excellent Christian themes but is sadly far too short.

(These reviews covered all seven books of "The Chronciles of Narnia", the three novels of "The Space Trilogy", "The Abolition of Man", "The Four Loves", "A Preface to Paradise Lost", a revised version of my 2000 review of "Till We Have Faces", "Surprised By Joy", and "The Screwtape Letters". I have published newly written reviews of "The Space Trilogy" composed long after I wrote the three original reviews of Lewis's science fiction.)
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on 24 October 2012
[Throughout the years, I have written a number of reviews that have never been published online on Amazon. These writings comprise two types of reviews: unfinished reviews, abandoned during various stages of composition, and completed reviews that for life reasons were never posted. Of the later type, back in September 2001 I wrote a cache of work, a full sixteen reviews* of several different C. S. Lewis books which have never been released. I have issued these reviews in October 2012 on Amazon.com, over a decade after they were initially written. However, these reviews were heavily edited and in several instances radically and drastically revised. I am publishing these reviews now for the first time in their original, unrevised format as written in 2001, with bracketed additions added for occasionally necessary clarification. Mike London 10-23-2012]

Out of the Silent Planet, the first book in the Space Trilogy, stands as the most scifi of the three. While Perelandra stands more as a religious novel and That Hideous Strength as academic satire and anti-utopian fiction, Out of the Silent Planet has the most common elements of the science fiction genre. The opening dedication also bears an interesting thought. The opening book is dedicated to Warren, Lewis's brother, who is "a life long critic of the space and time story." To the Inklings this was something of a pun, as this dedication had a dual meaning. In one sense, it is just the literal level, but in another, it means Warren is critical of the idea that all there is to the universe is space and time.

Lewis' main attack here is the idea of Weston of populating other worlds and eradicating those beings which are there, which is embodied in a very favourable light by Olaf Stapeldon in his novel First and Last Men. The mere thought of killing other sentient creatures, if they did indeed exist, to propitiate the human race was, to Lewis, a true monstrosity.

The astronomical distances were enacted by God as quarantines, and the worlds we could get to could not sustain life in the real universe. In Lewis's, both Mars and Venus can support life but Jupiter and Saturn cannot. However, Mars is dying and Perelandra is an unfallen world that will aid in the fight against the Bent One, or Satan. We also get a manifestation of what will occur if we allow greed to rule our lives with Devine, who is so far gone that the Oyarsa of Mars would unbody him if Devine was a Malacandrian native because the hnau is out of him and he is only on the level of the animal.

Again, this is a common theme in Lewis that evil, if followed to its extreme, will cause you to lose all of your humanity. One of the most effective scenes in the entire trilogy is the first meeting of the Ransom and the hrossa. It describes, very accurately, what it must be like to encounter an alien species for the first time. Both want to make contact, but both are rather nervous about it.

One major thing that interested me about Out of the Silent Planet was Ransom's continuous flight from the sorns. From the very beginning Ransom automatically assumes that the sorns wish him harm because of the conversation he overheard by Devine and Weston. From this, he begins his already constantly journeying life. Out of the Silent Planet is a composite of journeys, with Ransom journeying on a walking holiday across England, and then a journey to free Harry, then to Mars on the space ship. He escapes from Weston and Devine so they won't offer him to the sorns (which makes a very large part of Ransom's overall journey). Here he meets Hyoi and journeys with him to his home. Ransom from there journeys to hunt the hnakra, then to Augray's cave, and from there to Meldilorn and then to home. After all this, he ends up in the pub. This constant journeying also comes into play in the Narnia books. This journey also ties into the spiritual journeys that Lewis's characters' are experiencing ties into their own spiritual progression, which is most evident in The Pilgrim's Regress.

One of the most amazing things about this book to me is the fact that out of the 60 reviews it received on initial publication, which was a rather large number for a relatively unknown writer, which C. S. Lewis was at that time, only two noticed the Christian theology throughout the piece, which strikes me as very odd.

Lewis became convinced that you could smuggle any amount of theology into a person's mind if you simply called it romance and have done with it. Indeed, that is what the rest of his major fiction did, and almost all if it is successful. Where it becomes quite plain what Lewis is doing with Perelandra, but as it is so obviously the story of the unfallen Adam and Eve and their temptation on Perelandra it does not violate my own personal ascetic that I dealt with during the discussion of LWW. Part of the spell of that story is the fact that it is the Christian story retold, but this time with a happy ending.

The single greatest weakness with this book, however, is the length. While Perelandra could have benefited had he cut some of the more preachy sections at the end on the Holy Mountain, this book ends entirely too soon. We do not receive nearly enough exposure to the third race, and Meldilorn is reached to quickly. This is a tale that would have benefited the addition of about another one hundred pages, but sadly it does not. As it is the most science fiction of the three, Out of the Silent Planet is all the more disappointing in this facet. This is the only book of the Space Trilogy which reads like a traditional Wells fantasy, so it would have been much nicer had there been some more length. As it stands, however, Out of the Silent Planet is a good novel with excellent Christian themes but is sadly far too short.
.
.
-----
[In 2007 I wrote and published this review on Amazon.com]

OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET, published in 1938 on recommendation of J. R. R. Tolkien, is the first novel of what has become known as the Space Trilogy, or Cosmic Trilogy, or the Ransom trilogy. OSP will be the most satisfactory for those looking for straight science fiction.

There are three primary influences that caused Lewis to write OSP. The first is David Lindsay's VOYAGE TO ARCTURAS (a novel that famed literary critic Harold Bloom wrote a sequel too, called THE FLIGHT TO LUCIFER. This is Bloom's only published fiction, and he has longed disowned the novel). It was ARCTURAS that showed you could deal with high philosophical and theological matters in the guise of science fiction.

The second influence was the well-known conversation between Tolkien and Lewis in 1937 in which they lamented the state of current fiction and set out to write their own to help correct the matter. Tolkien was to write a time-travel story (his novel was abandoned and unfinished, published in HISTORY OF MIDDLE-EARTH VOL 5, THE LOST ROAD AND OTHER WRITINGS). And Lewis wrote a space-travel story (this novel), the only real science fiction novel he ever wrote..

The third major influence is H. G. Wells. Lewis says in an intro note before the novel that even though there are certain slighting remarks about Wells in the novel, he hopes people don't think him too stupid to enjoy Wells. And it is obvious from reading OSP Lewis is very much a fan of Well's science fiction (though not necessarily the social critic Wells tried to reinvent himself as), as a lot of the novel reads like something a Wells fan would write.

While the series has overall been labeled as science fiction, this is rather a misnomer. OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET is really the only true science fiction in the trilogy. PERELANDRA is a religious track, and THAT HIDEOUS STRENGTH is the hardest to classify of the three. You either love or hate it. Lewis called THS a fairy tale for adults, which is fine. But as this is a review of the first, lets keep to the first.

The best thing about this book is its interplanetary romance and its Christianity. You get to go see another world. Granted, the world Lewis describes is not the real Mars, but I have never held that against this book (some pervious reviewers have cited this as a fault). This is, after all, fiction, and does not need to be held in the confines of the real world. That is why I never understood people complaining of the science in this one. Still, there are some rather jarring slips, such as Ransom confusing the moon and the earth for one another, something that would never happen.

Elwin Ransom is kidnapped and taken onboard a spaceship to Mars. The novel opens with him on a walking holiday (something Lewis himself was rather famous for taking - Tolkien went on one of his hiking trips and soon found himself rather out of sorts with his body, and struck to shorter jaunts around Oxford with his dear friend). Ransom chances upon two men in an old house, one of which he knows. This is Dick Devine and Proffessor Weston. Originally they were going to kidnap a mentally challenged boy, but on second thought decide to take Ransom instead, to appease an alien species named the sorns in order to get more of the metal the sorn's call "sun's blood" (really gold). So they capture Ransom and travel to Mars in a spaceship of Weston's design.

Though he fears what he may find there, when Ransom lands he runs away from his kidnappers and ultimately finds himself in company with another alien species. Malacandra (so called there) is a wonderful place, with three distinct species called hnau (the Hrossa, the pfifletriggi, and the sorns). He spends most of his time with the Hrossa. Over the course of the novel, he is introduced to all three alien species, though he spends very little time with the pfifletriggi. All three are vastly different, but all are important to the Martian society. Though he begins in fear of the sorns, ultimately they prove to be powerful allies.

There are also other inhabitants in Mars as well. Ransom also learns of Eldils (angels), and also about the Oyarsa, which is the ruler of Mars, and is an archangel. The climax of the novel features Ransom meeting the Oyarsa, and it is the Oyarsa who meters out justice to Weston and Devine.

Lewis touches upon several major themes in this introductory novel. Being the Christian that he is, Lewis models the story's cosmology off of Christian theology. In fact, of the initial 60 reviews that OSP garnered when it was first published, only a handful picked up on the heavy Christian undercurrents running throughout the novel. Lewis realised you can smuggle any amount of idealogy under the guise of romance.

The other major theme he touches upon is Weston's desire to colonize other planets. To Weston, humanity's survival is the most important thing, and will exterminate other lifeforms to take over their planet. Weston's position of racial geonicide is drawn from Olaf Stapledon's FIRST AND LAST MEN, a novel in which men do kill other species to take over their planet, and Stapledon's obvious endorsement of this racial murder. Lewis was horrified when he read this novel, and so crafted OSP as a response to this novel.

The first book, OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET, is the most SF of the three, and also the least satisfactory. The story is excellent, with Lewis using medieval influences to develop a Christian world view in a science fiction setting. Tolkien said in one of his letters (its in LETTERS OF J. R. R. TOLKIEN, one of the early ones), it is simply not long enough. It is a nice story of Ransom being kidnaped and then dealing with the Martian landscape. Yes, some of the science is dated but Lewis is more concerned with other themes to worry about "scientific credibility." Although some have said the characterization is flat, for those thirsty for SF this is the best of the three.

In several ways, OSP is a particular favorite yet also the most disappointing of the trilogy. Like Tolkien said, it's simply too short. Imaginatively, there are great scenes in the novel, any science fiction lover will find the novel richly rewarding. But as it's the only real science fiction Lewis wrote, I would like to see him have written a much longer novel.

Still, a great start for C. S. Lewis, the novelist.
.
.
-----
[In June 26, 2000, I wrote this unfinished review, previously unpublished]

OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET is really the only true science fiction in the trilogy. PERELANDRA is a religious track, and THAT HIDEOUS STRENGTH is the hardest to classify of the three. You either love or hate it. But as this is a review of the first, lets keep to the first.

The best thing about this book is its interplanetary romance and its Christianity. You get to go see another world. Granted, the world Lewis describes is not the real Mars, but I have never held that against this book (some pervious reviewers have cited this as a fault). This is, after all, fiction, and does not need to be held in the confines of the real world. That is why I never understood people complaining of the science in this one. Elwin Ransom is kidnapped and taken onboard a spaceship to Mars. Malacandra (so called there) is a wonderful place, with three distinct species called hnau (the Hrossa, the pfifletriggi, and
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on 9 October 2012
become known as the Space Trilogy, or Cosmic Trilogy, or the Ransom trilogy. OSP will be the most satisfactory for those looking for straight science fiction.

There are three primary influences that caused Lewis to write OSP. The first is David Lindsay's VOYAGE TO ARCTURAS (a novel that famed literary critic Harold Bloom wrote a sequel too, called THE FLIGHT TO LUCIFER. This is Bloom's only published fiction, and he has longed disowned the novel). It was ARCTURAS that showed you could deal with high philosophical and theological matters in the guise of science fiction.

The second influence was the well-known conversation between Tolkien and Lewis in 1937 in which they lamented the state of current fiction and set out to write their own to help correct the matter. Tolkien was to write a time-travel story (his novel was abandoned and unfinished, published in HISTORY OF MIDDLE-EARTH VOL 5, THE LOST ROAD AND OTHER WRITINGS). And Lewis wrote a space-travel story (this novel), the only real science fiction novel he ever wrote..

The third major influence is H. G. Wells. Lewis says in an intro note before the novel that even though there are certain slighting remarks about Wells in the novel, he hopes people don't think him too stupid to enjoy Wells. And it is obvious from reading OSP Lewis is very much a fan of Well's science fiction (though not necessarily the social critic Wells tried to reinvent himself as), as a lot of the novel reads like something a Wells fan would write.

While the series has overall been labeled as science fiction, this is rather a misnomer. OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET is really the only true science fiction in the trilogy. PERELANDRA is a religious track, and THAT HIDEOUS STRENGTH is the hardest to classify of the three. You either love or hate it. Lewis called THS a fairy tale for adults, which is fine. But as this is a review of the first, lets keep to the first.

The best thing about this book is its interplanetary romance and its Christianity. You get to go see another world. Granted, the world Lewis describes is not the real Mars, but I have never held that against this book (some pervious reviewers have cited this as a fault). This is, after all, fiction, and does not need to be held in the confines of the real world. That is why I never understood people complaining of the science in this one. Still, there are some rather jarring slips, such as Ransom confusing the moon and the earth for one another, something that would never happen.

Elwin Ransom is kidnapped and taken onboard a spaceship to Mars. The novel opens with him on a walking holiday (something Lewis himself was rather famous for taking - Tolkien went on one of his hiking trips and soon found himself rather out of sorts with his body, and struck to shorter jaunts around Oxford with his dear friend). Ransom chances upon two men in an old house, one of which he knows. This is Dick Devine and Proffessor Weston. Originally they were going to kidnap a mentally challenged boy, but on second thought decide to take Ransom instead, to appease an alien species named the sorns in order to get more of the metal the sorn's call "sun's blood" (really gold). So they capture Ransom and travel to Mars in a spaceship of Weston's design.

Though he fears what he may find there, when Ransom lands he runs away from his kidnappers and ultimately finds himself in company with another alien species. Malacandra (so called there) is a wonderful place, with three distinct species called hnau (the Hrossa, the pfifletriggi, and the sorns). He spends most of his time with the Hrossa. Over the course of the novel, he is introduced to all three alien species, though he spends very little time with the pfifletriggi. All three are vastly different, but all are important to the Martian society. Though he begins in fear of the sorns, ultimately they prove to be powerful allies.

There are also other inhabitants in Mars as well. Ransom also learns of Eldils (angels), and also about the Oyarsa, which is the ruler of Mars, and is an archangel. The climax of the novel features Ransom meeting the Oyarsa, and it is the Oyarsa who meters out justice to Weston and Devine.

Lewis touches upon several major themes in this introductory novel. Being the Christian that he is, Lewis models the story's cosmology off of Christian theology. In fact, of the initial 60 reviews that OSP garnered when it was first published, only a handful picked up on the heavy Christian undercurrents running throughout the novel. Lewis realised you can smuggle any amount of idealogy under the guise of romance.

The other major theme he touches upon is Weston's desire to colonize other planets. To Weston, humanity's survival is the most important thing, and will exterminate other lifeforms to take over their planet. Weston's position of racial geonicide is drawn from Olaf Stapledon's FIRST AND LAST MEN, a novel in which men do kill other species to take over their planet, and Stapledon's obvious endorsement of this racial murder. Lewis was horrified when he read this novel, and so crafted OSP as a response to this novel.

The first book, OUT OF THE SILENT PLANET, is the most SF of the three, and also the least satisfactory. The story is excellent, with Lewis using medieval influences to develop a Christian world view in a science fiction setting. Tolkien said in one of his letters (its in LETTERS OF J. R. R. TOLKIEN, one of the early ones), it is simply not long enough. It is a nice story of Ransom being kidnaped and then dealing with the Martian landscape. Yes, some of the science is dated but Lewis is more concerned with other themes to worry about "scientific credibility." Although some have said the characterization is flat, for those thirsty for SF this is the best of the three.

In several ways, OSP is a particular favorite yet also the most disappointing of the trilogy. Like Tolkien said, it's simply too short. Imaginatively, there are great scenes in the novel, any science fiction lover will find the novel richly rewarding. But as it's the only real science fiction Lewis wrote, I would like to see him have written a much longer novel.

Still, a great start for C. S. Lewis, the novelist.
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on 30 June 2012
This is the first of CS Lewis' Science Fiction Trilogy. I read all three books in the 1960s at about the same time as I was reading "Mere Christianity" and was impressed that the author could write such very different books.

The "hero" of the book, Ransom, is kidnapped by physicist Weston and his financial backer Devine and taken to Malacandra (the planet we call Mars). There Ransom meets three intelligent species and the "angelic" overseer of Malacandra, Oyarsa.

Lewis said that his fictional stories always began with pictures in his mind and he paints vivid word pictures of the experience of being in space, the surface of Malacandra and the three intelligent species.

Devine's interest in Malacandra is to plunder the planet of gold (and presumably anything else of value). Weston's long term intention is to colonise the planet and exterminate the natives, whom he regards as primitives, as a prelude to the expansion of the human race throughout the universe. Ransom is not heroic (although he does become a "hnakra-slayer") and his main role is to learn the Malacandrian language and so act as interpreter for Weston. But Ransom does grow in the story. He learns that his fears of both space and alien worlds are groundless and that his other fears can be conquered.

This novel is almost unique in Science Fiction in that it suggests that exploration of space by Mankind might not be an altogether good thing - in marked contrast to, for example, "Star Trek". It is still one of my favourite space travel romances and I thoroughly recommend it.
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This is the first book in C.S. Lewis's amazing Space Trilogy. These books are far less known than Lewis's Narnia series or even his Mere Christianity or The Screwtape Letters, yet it is just as good as any of those writings and goes to show the versatility of Lewis as an author.

This first book begins with our hero, Dr. Ransom, out for a walking tour in the countryside, dressed in that shabby way for which professors are renowned. His foes are his former schoolmates Devine and Weston. These men believe they need a human sacrifice, and by capturing Ransom they have their victim, for they have made a spaceship and are taking Ransom to Malacandra the red planet.

Once on Mars, Ransom escapes his captors, meets many species, and finds out that on Mars there has been no `Fall' and Ransom from Earth or the Silent Planet is a bit of an oddity. People from earth are considered to be `bent' in nature, from the original sin of the fall.

Follow Ransom as he treks across a strange world, and must find the courage to risk it all to save not only an alien race, but also, possibly his own soul.

This is a first book in an amazing series. Try it - you won't be disappointed.
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on 20 January 2014
Forgetting just how intelligent Lewis is, this was a wonderful refresher into the imagination of such a great writer. It was impossible not to sink into such a fantastic world, and I was reading parts to my husband just to share with him how wonderful it really was. Details such as language, and how it can change the perception of "civilisation" gave me so much to think about, and despite it being remarkably short you feel for the hnau Ransom meets on his adventure.

I would recommend this to anyone, and personally will be starting the second in the trilogy in the minutes after I have finished this review. Science-fiction has this wonderful way of challenging the norms of life, and this was so subtly done so as to not exclude those who would read it without a philosophical mind. It would be far too easy to begin to hope that the descriptions were truth, and has so much to continue to think about, I will be enjoying this in my memory for a good long time to come.
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