Customer Reviews


16 Reviews
5 star:
 (13)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Survival Guide for young black women!! A MUST READ.
Mad Love to the Author!!!! Joan Morgan is a phenomenalwriter. "When Chickenheads...." is a a must read for all young black women. She embraces and addresses so many themes and issues that are essential to the survival of young black women in the age of the chickenhead. From the perspective of the reader, this book, made me feel as if I was engaged in an...
Published on 6 Aug 1999

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars A reread and then some
I was excited to read this book but when I did, it left me empty. I felt like something was missing but I can't figure what. I did not think any less or any more than before I read it about black women. So I remain unimpressed with the book and with the sorry blurbs on the back from "black celebrities" who sounded as if they skimmed the book if even...
Published on 11 Mar 1999


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Survival Guide for young black women!! A MUST READ., 6 Aug 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
Mad Love to the Author!!!! Joan Morgan is a phenomenalwriter. "When Chickenheads...." is a a must read for all young black women. She embraces and addresses so many themes and issues that are essential to the survival of young black women in the age of the chickenhead. From the perspective of the reader, this book, made me feel as if I was engaged in an empowering conversation with one of my homegirls,my big sister, and my best friend. I could relate on a personal level to her stance on most issues and experiences. This Sistah drops "mad knowledge" combined with lots of food for thought. She brings to light many important issues faced not only by the African-American community, but by people in general. She forces us to take a reflective look within at the Chickenhead in us all, allowing us to put that undesirable sistah or brotha in check. I Love this book. Brothas need to read this book also,to gain much needed insight on the perspectives of sistahs.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This book is a Must Read for everyone!!, 20 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
Joan Morgan quote's Gloria Steinem "Our mothers did a great job raising their daughters to become the men they once wanted to marry. But how about raising their sons to become the men their daughters need?
She says STRONGBLACKWOMAN mentality is a throw back to slavery days when the white oppressors on the plantations dehumanized black men especially to follow their master's guidance and stay enslaved. Michelle Wallace's book, Black Macho and the Myth of Superwoman is another example of our black women putting their needs after everyone else (friends, family, children, husbands, significant others).
She says Black Hip Hop Feminism if about Black women having their "Own" but still wants a man to be a man and open that door, pay that dinner check, etc. Its nice to know someone likes/cares/needs you/loves you enough to do these things.
Her mother instilled the importance of financial independence, self reliance, and determination so her only daughter would know that her heart, soul, spirit, and body were simply not for sale.
90's Black women can not be defined by what happened to our great grand/grand mothers or even our mothers. This is a new hip hop generation, where Black women do not need to blindly defend any "Brother" from attach by the system, when many times what he has done makes him deserve to be buried under the jail.
There are good "Brothers" out there. Don't settle for less, be selective and demand respect in your relationship.
Feminism is not about black/white/yellow, etc, its about being all you can be!!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read 4 all(especially young) African American females, 25 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
While reading "When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost", by Joan Morgan, I couldn't help but feel like I was being lectured on what it means to truly be a Strong Black Woman. Although I'm of the male gender I felt everything Ms. Joaney Joan Joan was talking about, but I still thought she was to repetitive in some areas, however, I ain't mad at her. This book is very interesting and keep you waiting for the knowledge she's going to kick on the next page. I think all females, the chickenheads, hoodrats, lesbians, churchgirls,professionals,hip-hop feminist,and not to mention the men folk should all read this book to learn a thing or 2 about themselves and about feminism.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars speak sister, 14 Mar 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
Ms Morgan was on point. She tells it like it is. She has managed to say everything that I and many others have known and maybe did not have the courage to say. Think twice before proclaiming that I am STRONG BLACK WOMAN. Joan has open our eyes and mind to the state of affairs of what it entails when we embark on that journey of self relization. I highlighted and have memorized her mission statement, "I honestly believe that the only way sistas can begin to experience empowerment on all levels-spiritual, emotional, financial, and political- is to understand who we are- and then tell the truth about it". BROTHERS YOU ARE A PART OF OUR EMPOWERMENT so it is necessary for you to gain insight so please read this and sit down with that sister and have that meaningful discussion. For those who are therapist phobic read this book and embark on your journey of SOUL CLEANSING. Ms Morgan thanks for your candor.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book that told it how it is and kept it real., 10 July 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
Joan Morgan is an extrodinary black women deriving out of the hip-hop generation. Looking outside the hip-hop generation, many only view us as hip-hop heads with no mind-sense and no value for intelligence and education. Joan Morgan set yet another example of how intelligent and extrodinary black people are that are in the hip-hop culture. Morgan not only kept it real with our society today within the black community but within black on black relationships and women in a psychological point-of-view. As a femimist, Morgan did not attack men, nor did she necessarily totally glorify women. Morgan just told it how it is and did not try to sugarcoat everything. As a black person, as a woman, as a feminist, or as one deriving from the hip-hop generation, this book can relate to almost anybody.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A New Vision of Feminism for a "Post Feminist" Generation, 5 April 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
Wow! What a provocative, irreverant, hopeful book. Joan Morgan's lyrical, self-revealing essays graciously welcome us to her world of hip black intellectuals. Her goal is use this journey of self-discovery to advance the full empowerment of her black sisters. To do so, she suggest modifying feminism to apply to the special circumstances of black women. Women of color have a much greater sense of solidarity with their male counterparts, their comrades in a common struggle with racism. Traditional feminism's model of the male oppressor and the female victim does not adequately address black women's experience. Morgan shows how a modified feminism can explain and improve relations between her brothers and sisters, a necessary step toward empowering black women. Hip-hop is her metaphor for this new vision of feminism. She wants a feminism as complex as the music. "We need a voice like our music - - - one that samples and layers many voices, injects its sensibilities into the old and flips it into something new, provocative and powerful." This is a nuanced feminism, subtle shades of gray rather than stark black and white oppositions. Morgan admits that hip-hop is often laced with sexist lyrics, but she asks that the music be understood as an expression of the pain of the black male experience, noting that male hip-hop artists are as denigrating of themselves as they are of women. As she sees it, the sexist name-calling in hip-hop isn't personal; it's just part of the profound self-loathing illness hip-hop articulates. This voicing of collective black pain can lead to a redemptive healing for black brothers and sisters. On the other hand, Morgan is unwilling to let black males hide behind the cloak of "endangered black males" to shirk responsibility. Brothers who altogether lack drive, direction and gumption will not coerce her into playing the role of the "strong black woman" duty-bound to help black men reach their potential. Her model for an egalitarian affectionate relationship is a fair and demanding one: "I believe in myself, I want my man to believe in himself. I work hard, I want him to work hard. I love black folks and life and myself, and I want him to do the same." In Morgan's view redemptive healing for her brothers and sisters requires acknowledging how black women often contribute to their own oppression by black males. Gripped with an understandable concern for the "endangered black male," black women have been overprotective of their sons and too accepting of irresponsible behavior they would never accept from their daughters. This same outlook leads black women to tolerate abusive behavior from their spouses and lovers. Moreover, the predominant view among successful black women that black males are dispensable as parents, unneeded except for whatever minimal financial contribution can be obtained, oppresses everyone, sisters, brothers and their children. At her most provocative, Morgan maintains that sisters should insist on an equal parental role for black men, giving up the present exclusive focus on male financial obligations. This may mean enforced, equal time joint custody in the event of divorce with each parent solely responsible for financial support of the child during his or her period of custody and neither paying child support to the other. Morgan even challenges the traditional feminist view that women should have the exclusive say in matters of reproductive rights. Since adoption and abortion are legal alternatives, women now have the legal right to choose not to parent in the event of an unplanned pregnancy, a right not available to men. This is inconsistent with the goal of gender equality, forcing males to be parents when they do not want to be. That is not to say that a man should be able to veto a woman's decision to parent. Instead, Morgan wants men to have the legal right to abdicate parental rights and be free of all financial responsibility. The feminist extension of "my body, my baby, my choice," according to Morgan, is "my sole financial responsibility." What does all this have to do with "chickenheads coming home to roost?" Morgan's hardworking, career women sisters view with disdain and envy the good looking, subservient black women ("chickenheads") who stay at home, supported by successful black men. She counsels her career-minded sisters to admit to common bonds with their "chickenhead" sisters. In one way or another all women struggling to survive in an inarguably sexist world must use their looks, femininity and flirtation to gain advantage. There has been much controversy recently about whether feminism has any continuing relevance to a new "post feminist" generation of young women. Morgan's beautiful, lyrical book answers that question with a resounding "yes." All of us who are concerned with the continuing evolution of feminism and with the liberation of our black sisters and brothers should read this book and celebrate it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars The new and misunderstood young, black woman., 11 Jun 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
Morgan eloquently voices the thoughts and desires of the independent, feminist, African American woman. She acknowledges the black feminists of the past but explains that today's feminists of the hip hop generation are different and they express different needs and desires from themselves and the people surrounding them whether they be male or female.
In her last essay "Chickenhead Envy" she acknowledges that "strongblackwomen" and "chickenheads" may have the same wants and desires but the roads they take to achieve them are different, creativing a dividing line coated with animosity.
Morgan calls herself a STRONGBLACKWOMAN in remission, saying she doesn't not want to be lauded for her success through struggle. Eliminating struggle from a black woman's life does not make her any less of a woman.
I recommend this book to women and men, black and white, young and old. If you have a desire to understand today's young African American woman, Morgan's blunt, in-your-face writing will give you an look instead the mind of one who is such.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent!! Funny!!! Real!!!!, 10 Mar 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
When ChickenHeads Come Home is a real look at what young single black women face. Being 27, gainfully employed and a homeowner puts me in a bad category for dating. I found myself settling and excepting less than the best treatment and fighting lots of sexism and ignorance from my own brothers along the way. I began to wonder if Black men truly like us. I'm not your enemy brother man because I do for myself, make waves for myself and want better for myself. You should treasure me, not complain to me about a chickenhead who doesn't want anything other than you. I actually had an ex who babysitted a chicken's cat, when I couldn't get him to page me back. But that's life and Joan's book brought everything to the forefront. My standards are high (as they should be) and my legs are closed (celibant for 10 months). When the brothers get tired of chickenheads, I be here ready and prepared to create a Black family.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars This book is truly a gem!, 11 May 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
As a young black woman, still in the process of shaping and defining my views about feminism, I found this book completely refreshing. Many of the opinions, thoughts, and views conveyed by Morgan are similar to my own. I was astounded!
While I didn't always agree with her point-of-view in the chapter entitled, "Babymother" I saw the validity in what she was saying. The only thing missing from this book (which I kept hoping that Morgan would address) was the place of women in Jamaican-American culture and how feminism can be applied in the West Indian community. (esp. since she is a Jamaican woman living in Brooklyn). However, I enjoyed this book overall and would recommend it to any young, black woman.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Tellin' like it really is!, 9 Mar 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist (Hardcover)
Joan Morgan nails the issues dead on the head in this book, and the Sister pulls not punches! The book makes you sit down and take a good look at things you have allowed to go on in your life and whether you need to reevaluate how you proceed going forward. However, this is not another "spiritual journey". I have urged all my girlfriends to read and decide for themselves. The book really spoke to me. There is something every woman can identify with in the book. I could not put the book down. As I was reading it, I kept hearing my self saying my girls have got to read this! I look forward to hearing this Sister's voice in the future!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

When Chickenheads Come Home to Roost: My Life as a Hip Hop Feminist
Used & New from: £6.14
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews