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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It may not be his best, but still.........
As a huge Rushdie fan, I came to read Fury with high expectations, and I was not disappointed. Although the novel may lack what has become thought of as the 'traditional Rushdie style', in other words, a lively and compelling tale of relationships, contrasts between East and West and a wild array of exciting and inspiring characters, Fury should be appreciated for these...
Published on 3 Oct. 2002 by littlejeni

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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A frankenstein's monster of a novel
For what is supposed to be a personal novel, "Fury" comes across as a book populated by authors other than Salman Rushdie. It just doesn't read like he's put any effort in at all, it is fast yet curiously devoid of any real emotion. Like a Frankenstein's monster whose stitches are coming apart, the book feels like a rag bag of different elements, none of which...
Published on 25 Sept. 2001


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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It may not be his best, but still........., 3 Oct. 2002
This review is from: Fury (Paperback)
As a huge Rushdie fan, I came to read Fury with high expectations, and I was not disappointed. Although the novel may lack what has become thought of as the 'traditional Rushdie style', in other words, a lively and compelling tale of relationships, contrasts between East and West and a wild array of exciting and inspiring characters, Fury should be appreciated for these differences and not blindly shunned at first glance.
Instead of becoming entwined with characters and their actions, in the novel we instead become enveloped in that most volatile of emotions, fury. The protagonist, Milak Solanka, is almost completely overtaken by his own fury and the novel deals, often in the most covert of ways, with his attempts to deal not with others and outside events, but with himself.
Compelling, undeniably interesting, almost too clever for its own good yet ultimately enjoyable, Fury is certainly one of the best books published in the last year. If it were by anyone other than the great Rushdie it would be heralded as a work of genius.
Give it a chance, throw away your preconceptions of what a Rushdie novel should be, and take Fury for the fantastic novel that it is.
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A frankenstein's monster of a novel, 25 Sept. 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Fury (Hardcover)
For what is supposed to be a personal novel, "Fury" comes across as a book populated by authors other than Salman Rushdie. It just doesn't read like he's put any effort in at all, it is fast yet curiously devoid of any real emotion. Like a Frankenstein's monster whose stitches are coming apart, the book feels like a rag bag of different elements, none of which have a soul of their own
Lots of passages read like bad impersonations of great American writers. Rushdie is not Philip Roth so why try to borrow his bilious cynical style? He cannot get under the skin of New York so why try to be Paul Auster or Don Delillo? All the way through you wish for those writers to be writing this book, not Rushdie. This is a shame because he is normally such a mercurial writer. In "Fury" however he seems to top even Bret Easton Ellis for vapid contemporary references. What makes this even worse is the smug tone to it all. It seems to think that it is very clever when it sounds more like a man bragging in a bar.
For me, one particular passage sums up this messy novel. A back story about one of the characters (Eric [?] the jock boyfriend) is written in the pared down style of Raymond Carver and Richard Ford. The story is very reminiscent of both writers and the characters surnames are Ford and Carver. I think you are supposed to think this is clever and ironic but it sounds like showing off.
Rushdie is so much better than this,so much so that "Fury" feels like a bit of a cheat. Maybe this book was a way of getting something off his chest before embarking on a major work. I hope so
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An intelligent and entertaining read if you stick with it!, 3 Oct. 2002
By A Customer
This review is from: Fury (Paperback)
This was my first Rushdie novel and I was relieved to find that it was a great read.
I must admit my initial impression was that the novel was pretentious and inaccessible. I struggled through the first few chapters, which are thin on plot and characterisation but rich with philosophical ideas and historical and literary references (half of which I needed to look up!).
However, once the story took over (and maybe also the author stopped trying quite so hard to impress) I really enjoyed the tale and admired Rushdie's intelligent narrative without feeling intimidated.
It is true that Rushdie borrows heavily from a diverse range of other writers, but he weaves the different styles together skillfully and I found this added to my enjoyment of the novel. I was delighted to find parallels between this work and that of many of my favourite authors including Raymond Carver and even Hubert Selby Jr. As a big fan of the former, I particularly enjoyed this novel's poignant final chapter.
I would recommend this novel and urge readers new to this author to stick with it through the first few chapters. It is well worth the effort.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My First Rushdie Novel!!!, 4 July 2007
This review is from: Fury (Paperback)
A really enjoyable read!!! From the beginning Rushdie's narration is driven from the perpective of his protagnist Malik Solanka(a philosopher cum popular dollmaker) a character, who one can assume, is not unlike Rushdie (middle aged, tempremental and member of privilegded arty circles). The emphasis on Malik's perceptions gives Rushdie a platform to explore ideas that are seemingly specific to him but which are surprisingly universal. Plot wise it revolves around Malik fleeing to New York from London and his family. This escape is a result of a strange incident which has led him to believe he may possibly harm his family. In New York he is forced to make sense of himself and the world around him. This done by a his exploration of; the strange city he finds himself in; his roots in India; his marriages; his sexual daliances; his success as the creator of doll which has become a media sensation; his high soceity friends.

Due to the Fury's autobigraphical slant Rushdie indulges himself in a fair degree of -thinly veiled- self-aggrandisement. This is particularly evident in the media impact Malik's creation (a doll) has on mainstream culture. Also, Malik's other creations bizzarely become an integral part of coup on a politically tumultuous pacific island (think Fiji). However in spite of this, Fury is a good novel. In a lot of ways I found it similar to Saturday by Ian McEwan, not in regards to plot or even in terms of tone...however both Fury and Saturday seem to explore post-middle aged angst in a universal and human way.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fury, 11 Jun. 2003
By 
Jo Skipp (Broadstairs, Kent) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fury (Paperback)
This is the second Rushdie book I have read, and despite almost being put off the author by his self absorbed attitude, my faith has been renewed. Fury is an excellent book with some fantasic 'one liners' which really made you sit upright and think. His ability to stike a chord with the readers own life experience is amazing, even though the plot is far fetched, relevancy is still maintained. A great read - and I feel a slight sense of loss that closing the book waves goodbye to the main character.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not his best, yet........, 3 Oct. 2002
This review is from: Fury (Paperback)
As a big Rushdie fan, I came to read Fury with high hopes and these were certainly not dashed. Rather than the overwhelmingly character-based and lovable epic of 'The Ground Beneath Her Feet', Fury is far more of a concept novel, a novel dealing with the mysteries of emotions. The characters may be more difficult to relate to than in his previous works, but this only helps the reader view the subject matter more objectively and works for the novel, not against it.
Interesting, lively, definitely enjoyable and at times paradoxical, this is a well writtern and compelling novel that is well worth a read if only to see what all the fuss is about!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable and unfairly criticised work, 11 July 2002
This review is from: Fury (Hardcover)
Although perhaps not up to the standard of his previous novels "Midnight's Children", "Shame" or "The Moor's Last Sigh" (which also received a fair pasting, if I recall correctly) "Fury" is still miles better than many highly praised novels. What is it with the British literary establishment? You move to America and every book that you write thereafter is automatically proclaimed a turkey? Do yourself a favour and read this book. Sure, Rushdie is pretty much a "love him or hate him" author, but if you love him you'll not find too many reasons not to love this!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More like mildly annoying, 1 Jan. 2006
By 
2cleverbyhalf (somewhere in the future) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fury (Paperback)
I suppose it was worth reading, it keeps bumping along, but there are way too many loose ends in Fury to make it thoroughly recommendedable. The main problem with this novel is there are dozens of ideas and none of them are properly worked out. First it's an old man's sadness at the passing of time, then it's a murder mystery, then it's an allegory, then it's a satire.
The whole 'beautful young women can't resist rich old intellectuals' is also a bit tiresome, especially when it happens twice in the storyline.
Still, the language is fruity and witty, and the plot - jagged as it is - at least swerves enough time to keep you interested. So in the end it's probably worth the effort.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Life is fury...., 12 Nov. 2001
This review is from: Fury (Hardcover)
FURY is a novel which is difficult to place in relation to Rushdie's other works. It does not stand so far outside the body of the rest of his work as does his first novel GRIMUS [a sci-fi fantasy novel with an Amerindian, rather than 'India-Indian', protagonist], yet it does not seem to quite belong with MIDNIGHT'S CHILDREN or even his most recent preceding novel THE GROUND BENEATH HER FEET. On the prosaic side, it is much shorter than his other novels (a mere 279 pages); however, it also simply has a different feel from his other books (see more on this below). One practical effect of FURY's brevity (compared to his other works) is that we do not get to see the entirety of all of the characters. There are some characters, who though very vividly invoked, make but brief appearances in the novel (much more characteristic of a Mike Leigh film than a Rushdie novel). I do not think FURY is quite the equal of MIDNIGHT'S CHILDREN, but their differences make them hard to compare (and, my rating shows that I still think FURY an excellent book). That said, I would still rather recommend MIDNIGHT'S CHILDREN or THE MOOR'S LAST SIGH to a reader who wants an introduction into Rushdie's work.
Despite being set in New York (and despite some reviews to the contrary), FURY is not an 'American' novel. It is a novel by an author who, like FURY's hero Prof. Malik Solanka, was bred in Bombay, educated in London and recently taken up residence in the USA. Besides, it does not seem particularly useful to attempt to classify Rushdie's books by such national adjectives, at least no more than to see Joyce's FINNEGAN'S WAKE as an 'Irish' novel. FURY involves America, India and England (as well as Fiji, under the Swiftian pseudonym 'Lilliput-Blefuscu').
The story itself is part murder-mystery, part romance, part sci-fi, part political allegory-it is a bitter satire of the 'money-mad burg' of New York and black comedy about human nature in general (thus, again, not really centred on America in particular). While dark and perhaps disturbing in parts, these elements are mixed with a moving love-story and the novel is filled with many moments of lighter humour.
As in his previous novel THE GROUND BENEATH HER FEET, Rushdie examines the relation of the artist to his creation and his audience. Solanka is a Cambridge-philosopher-turned-dollmaker who has unwittingly (and unwillingly) created a pop-culture phenomenon that represents almost everything he despises about modern culture. His pop-culture heroine, a BBC-TV star named Little Brain, originates as an intelligent, if irreverent, girl-doll who travels through time to have discussions with people like Galileo. However, Solanka loses control over Little Brain and the TV programme becomes internationalised, low-brow, mindless drivel (in Solanka's opinion at least).
The title refers to the somewhat inexplicable fury (part of it seems to stem from the 'Little Brain saga') of the protagonist, who at one point in time finds himself standing over his sleeping wife and son with a kitchen knife and at another point suspects himself of being the serial killer (in a sort Jekell-Hyde fashion) murdering women in NYC with a block of concrete. It is this fury which causes him to flee London, without a word of explanation to his family, for New York, seeking to 'define' himself-or, rather, erase himself: Eat me, America, he prays, and give me peace. But the fury is not just that of the protagonist, but of almost everyone in the novel: Muslim taxi-drivers curse mindlessly at the other traffic in Urdu. Solanka's black friend Jack Rhinehart turns from being one the harshest critics of rich WASPish Americans (one kind of 'racial' fury) to trying to join their 'club' (and experiences another kind of 'racial' fury-frustration at not being fully 'admitted'). It also concerns the 'political' fury of one of the female protagonists, Neela Mahendra, at the treatment of Indian 'Lilliputians' by the indigenous 'Lilliput-Blefuscians'. Also, the Greek Furies themselves put in a sort of appearance at one point.
Having left his family and retreated into the anonymity of New York (a strange kind of modern sanyasi-behaviour?), the first part of the novel partly concerns his relationship with Mila Milo, a young Slavic-American girl who is a sort of fashion-chic-guru to a consortium of young computer-technology wizards. This relationship has reverberations of Lolita (due to the age difference and implications about Mila's father) as well as Pygmalion (as Mila reveres and emulates Little Brain, particularly her pop-culture manifestation). Mila is key to the latter development of Solanka's new creation: an internet sci-fi saga about a cyberneticist whose android-creations (like Solanka's Little Brain doll) eventually no longer obey his wishes (this mini-story about the relation between human and androids is also reminiscent of some of the issues about 'humanness' raised in Philip K Dick's DO ANDROIDS DREAM OF ELECTRIC SHEEP? [and the film BLADERUNNER, derived from that novel] ).
The main female protagonist in the novel, the one who pulls Solanka out of his fury and despair, is the ethereal, apsara-like, literally traffic-stopping Indian beauty (or, rather, Indo-Lilliputian beauty), Neela Mahendra. This character is transparently Rushdie's current girl-friend, the South Indian model/actress/cookery-book-writer Padma Lakshmi [see her book EASY EXOTIC], down to the herringbone scar on her right arm. This and other aspects of the novel make one feel it to be perhaps the most autobiographical of Rushdie's novels, though not in any unpleasant way. The latter part of the novel is primarily focussed on Solanka & Neela's relationship and Neela's part in the revolutionary activities in Lilliput-Blefuscu [read Fiji].
One of the striking differences between FURY and Rushdie's previous novels is the lack of what is often called 'magic realism'. There is nothing akin to the telepathic or other extra-ordinary abilities of the Midnight's Children in FURY (even Neela's ability to stop traffic Rushdie claims-and I don't doubt it-is true of her model Padma). The closest FURY comes to that sort of Rushdiesque touch of the not-quite-natural is the blending which occurs between Solanka's sci-fi internet saga about androids who revolt against their maker and the uprising of the Indo-Lillputians who start wearing masks based on the some of the android characters in Solanka's e[lectronic]-epic.
My opinion of FURY is that it is outstanding, like all of Rushdie's novels, even if it is very different from his normal fare. Again, I would recommend some of his earlier novels to those unfamiliar with Rushdie, but Rushdie-fans definitely should not miss FURY...
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4.0 out of 5 stars A master of the storytelling art, 7 Sept. 2009
By 
G. C. Brown "Neither them nor us" (Co. Down, N Ireland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fury (Hardcover)
Perhaps the greatest modern writer serves up a flourish of literary prowess and snobbery all injected with the usual lucid expression of the keenly observed. Oddly uninspiring, this woven interaction of the puppetry of magical realism with the realities of our existence provides a fable with no particular moral from a master of the storytelling craft. In other words it's hard not to admire his skill, but not a book I would strongly recommend. Not his best.
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Fury (Modern Library)
Fury (Modern Library) by Salman Rushdie (Paperback - 8 Jan. 2002)
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