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Customer Reviews

128
4.1 out of 5 stars
Sons and Lovers (Everyman's Library Classics & Contemporary Classics)
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 4 November 2011
I read this book as I had enjoyed Lady Chatterley's Lover. I found this book a little disappointing. At its centre is the stiflng relationship between Paul Morel and his mother. The first half of the book concerns the marriage of Paul's mother to his father, and how she is disappointed with domestic life married to a miner who drinks heavily. The second half explores Paul's attempts to form romantic liaisons whilst still being a mummy's boy. It is beautifully written, desperately sad, and about 200 pages too long. It moves too slowly for modern tastes.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on 25 February 2014
Read it many moons ago but forgot just how good DHL was. Most enjoyable. In simple language he transports the reader to a bygone time and experience where the characters are so real you feel you know them well.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
TOP 100 REVIEWERon 3 December 2010
This was the first Lawrence I ever read and so still reminds me of being 16,reading in the back garden of my parent's home... but even beyond the lovely memories it's still one of my favourites.

Passionate and enthralling, it shows Lawrence's skills at dissecting the relationships that bind men and women, and not just in a sexual sense. This is visceral and emotional, the kind of book that stops you in your tracks and makes you think 'yes, that's how life it'. Wonderful stuff and one of the most autobiographical of Lawrence's novels.
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on 14 March 2012
I read this again some forty years after first reading it at school. There'll be many more comprehensive and insightful reviews than I could provide, both by learned men and indeed students, so I should try and restrict myself to how I found the book.

Despite knowing the story I found it engaging. I enjoyed it. E-books have their detractors but one advantage is that you read books that you wouldn't go out and buy. I find myself reading something current then something old. It's widening my horizons. If you're thinking of reading this, just don't expect a modern day thriller, like some reviewers seem to. There isn't a thrill on every page or murder around every corner. Although Paul Morel's mother's death has it's own slant here. I wondered if Lawrence was writing today, he would find no problem with the censors, but the police may well have some interest in him and his sister. Exhumations and forensic testing perhaps.

The characters are expertly drawn and their interactions are what involves me in this book. Lawrence's observations of the countryside, the way of life in the early part of the twentieth century, the fashions even are fascinating and a great historical record. It just adds to the genuineness of the work. No need to read modern historical novels here. This is the real thing.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 16 June 2013
A fascinating tale of life in the coal-mining districts of the East Midlands. An insight into the way people lived in those difficult times. A sensitive portrayal of the relationship between the main character, Paul and the women in his life. I have since purchased the complete works of DH Lawrence.
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on 13 November 2013
On the plus side the language was vivid and gave a clear picture of all the settings of the novel . The characters were clearly drawn . Lawrence had themes - the place of women in society , sexuality , spirituality , the encroachment of industry into the countryside which he explored throughout the book . This is a book I read many years ago and the first time I had come across symbolism - sunsets etc . I've been finding it in books ever since .
On the minus side the book lacked subtlety and was very repetitive - how many times did Paul n Miriam look at the petals of a flower ? I felt I was being banged over the head by it all and couldn't wait to finish it .
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22 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on 20 October 2001
A critic once remarked that this is a book best appreciated in adolesence. Yes, I agree - that is when I first read it, but I also feel that this book, along with the short stories, are the perfect introduction to DHL. This is vintage DHL, the golden period post the early mistakes of over-writing and before the preaching mania took hold.

Think "Angela's Ashes", and you have the Morel family: mismatched and locked in eternal combat, yet held together by unknowable forces. At times, the writing soars on wings of pure poetry, and the ending, for me, foreshadowed Dylan Thomas at his best. It has also been said that this book begins as a 19th century novel, and ends as a 20th century one. DHL manages to straddle the best footholds in both traditions: good, clear story-telling, excellent characterisation, humour, pathos and psychological insight. For me, personally, the author he emulates most closely is Emily Bronte with her sense of another world beneath this physical one. Miriam's aching love for Paul echoes Catherine's and Heatchcliff's - it is frightening and choking, and that is why he must break from her. Reading this book is like seeing the world through a new pair of specs. Indeed, DHL makes everyday household objects tremble with life! Enjoy! And use it as a springboard to the more "difficult" novels.
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on 11 October 2013
This was just as enjoyable in electronic format as it was when I first read it 50 years ago. A down to earth, realistic picture is painted of Nottinghamshire life. It presents a social history of an early 20th century mining family, its struggles and hardships, together with excellent characterisation of the life, and deep personal feelings, mainly of a mother and her son, Paul. The portrayal of the other characters and their inner feelings is excellent. The novel examines the effects of drunkenness and violence, set within a close knit community. It contains romance and sadness. I love this book and have read it many times over.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 12 January 2014
This is a book I cannot stop reading .Lawrence is so descriptive ,of not just landscape and feelings but you almost feel you are spying on the family themselves.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 7 January 2015
I never thought this was my sort of reading but I loved it. This was part of my A level 20th cent. english lit. , two books have made me cry and this is one!
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