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5.0 out of 5 stars Window on the Universe
If you are strongly interested in the history of the physical sciences and astronomy then this is the book for you. If you thought that Galileo invented the astronomical telescope all of a piece while fiddling with lenses then you need to read this account to set the record straight. This is a major contribution to scholarship in which the long history of optics is...
Published on 3 April 2008 by Dr. S. A. Mitton

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2.0 out of 5 stars A Disappointing Read
This book, whilst the product of much scholarship, is very disappointing. Instead of the analysis of the optics and mechanics of telescope and lens design and construction I was expecting, it is an examination of boastful reports of curved mirrors by correspondents who seem to be reporting on items they have either not seen or have persuaded themselves possess magical...
Published on 22 Sep 2010 by Alan Fairhurst


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5.0 out of 5 stars Window on the Universe, 3 April 2008
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Dr. S. A. Mitton "Simon Mitton" (Cambridge UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Galileo's Glassworks: The Telescope and the Mirror (Hardcover)
If you are strongly interested in the history of the physical sciences and astronomy then this is the book for you. If you thought that Galileo invented the astronomical telescope all of a piece while fiddling with lenses then you need to read this account to set the record straight. This is a major contribution to scholarship in which the long history of optics is beautifully described. The quest for telescopic vision goes way back to antiquity, with its mythical and legendary accounts of magical and mystical mirrors used to see far-off enemies and immolate unwelcome warships. Eileen Reeves reminds us that Galileo had long had an interest in optics, a subject that he taught at the University of Padua. Her meticulous detective work is strong on the period (almost a year) between the inventions of the Dutch telescope based on two lenses and a tube, and Galileo's spectacular success in improving the invention. All previous attempts at telescopic vision (there were many) had involved unweildy combinations of a concave mirror and a lens (it would take the genius of the future Isaac Newton to crack that problem). And all previous attempts appear to have concentrated on military or covert applications. Galileo not only greatly improved the instrument, he used it to sweep the skies, making great discoveries.
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2.0 out of 5 stars A Disappointing Read, 22 Sep 2010
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This review is from: Galileo's Glassworks: The Telescope and the Mirror (Hardcover)
This book, whilst the product of much scholarship, is very disappointing. Instead of the analysis of the optics and mechanics of telescope and lens design and construction I was expecting, it is an examination of boastful reports of curved mirrors by correspondents who seem to be reporting on items they have either not seen or have persuaded themselves possess magical properties.
No doubt interesting enough to the student of the late-mediaeval mindset but to the student of early technology an example of why it is important to look over a book before purchasing.
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Galileo's Glassworks: The Telescope and the Mirror
Galileo's Glassworks: The Telescope and the Mirror by Eileen Reeves (Hardcover - 11 Jan 2008)
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