Customer Reviews


74 Reviews
5 star:
 (48)
4 star:
 (15)
3 star:
 (6)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Louder than everything else
Lemmy is the kind of rock star that makes you proud to be British. He doesn't take himself too seriously, he just wants to play in a rock and roll band and get laid after the show. In this book (called an autobiography, but it reads like an interview) he recounts his long career in rock, powered by amphetamines and bourbon, and it is a risible ride indeed. Stories of...
Published on 18 Sep 2003 by Chris Weston

versus
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Heavy duty fun
This is tons of fun. I say that with a bit of caution, because amongst all the stories of wildman antics and rows with record companies there are unwanted children given up for adoption, drug deaths and a murder. And I can't say I find Lemmy's views on disability funny, or agree with the argument he uses to justify his collection of Nazi memorabilia. But mostly this is a...
Published on 5 Aug 2011 by Adam Eterno


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Louder than everything else, 18 Sep 2003
This review is from: White Line Fever (Hardcover)
Lemmy is the kind of rock star that makes you proud to be British. He doesn't take himself too seriously, he just wants to play in a rock and roll band and get laid after the show. In this book (called an autobiography, but it reads like an interview) he recounts his long career in rock, powered by amphetamines and bourbon, and it is a risible ride indeed. Stories of drink-and-drug-induced foolishness abound, along with interesting pen sketches of his fellow band members over the years. I laughed out loud a lot whilst reading this book, you know you're always going to have a good time, all the time, with Motorhead.
It's the life that you're glad somebody led, just to prove that it can be done.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A parable for the ages, 30 Dec 2007
This review is from: White Line Fever: Lemmy - The Autobiography (Paperback)
Sure, lots of celebs enter extremely late middle age as well preserved national treasures; few do so on their own terms. Ian Kilmister--boomer, Capricorn, sometime loudest man on the planet--has lived his life like that Jimi Hendrix song: 'let me live my life, the way I want to'. Superficially, that might seem to add up to forty years of professional excess and little more, but as this work shows, it is actually a case-study in what it meant to grow up working class in the North of England immediately after the war. Nobody did a damn thing for him; he carved out what he did, despite a business that has ignored him, mispackaged him and exploited him pretty much since day 2.
Superficially, the book is about sex, drugs and the rest of it; in reality, its about the way in which popular culture has provoked profound social change in the UK and what it means to live through that social experiment--to live your life as an individual in an increasingly collective society.
Lemmy is at pains to emphasize that this is a life that has worked for him but would not work for everyone. He's quite happy to acknowledge that his libertarian views can translate into some un-PC attitudes--and mostly he's just *happy*, which is quite an accomplishment. Ever notice how successful people tend to be like elephants, reciting every grievance and every professional slight--despite a career full of them, Mr. Kilmister remains philosophical and phlegmatic about being thrown out of Hawkwind, the debacle of 'Another Perfect Day' and getting tossed aside by more record labels than he's had Malboros.
To repeat, this is neither philosophy nor literature, but if you want to know why folk like Dave Grohl seek out Lemmy to work with, then listen to 'Damage Case', read this book and you shall have insight.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Lemmy's unique gravelly voice comes through the pages clearly, 27 Dec 2013
By 
Sebastian Palmer "sebuteo" (Cambridge, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: White Line Fever: Lemmy - The Autobiography (Paperback)
Lemmy's something of a rock'n'roll icon, as famous for simply surviving a life of legendary excess as for his musical accomplishments. If I was a commercially successful musical artist, I reckon that would cheese me off! For all that Motörhead's music is fairly one-dimensional, and that they are chiefly known for one song - the classic Ace Of Spades - Lemmy makes it clear that he considers himself an artist, and that his chief interest is always the music he's currently making.

I have mixed feelings about the mixed messages Lemmy gives off with his unapologetic stance re a life of excessive drug and alcohol intake, but then his ornery 'go my own way' attitude is a very large part of who he is, and consequently also what Mötorhead is. But despite this aspect, which certainly makes for entertaining reading, if not exemplary role-model material, he's rightly proud of having carved out a livelihood in the precarious world of popular music.

Like many rock and pop memoirs, this is a collaboration with a writer (a lady named Janiss Garza in this instance). Whilst I prefer more articulate self-penned books such as Sting's Broken Music, this is nonetheless a fun and informative read. As is so often the case with popular music stories, the early days are the most intriguing, and in this case involve coming up in the hippie era, in a rootless bohemian mode, with our protagonist winding up in Hawkwind. The halcyon days with Motörhead follow, and then the story fizzles a bit, as we near the present.

Like Motörhead's music, this is straightforward, sometimes coarse, often exciting, and aimed perhaps more at the heart and the body than the brain. But it was a quick, easy and fun read, about an interesting life, and Lemmy's unique gravelly voice comes through the pages clearly, so I'd certainly recommend it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars what you always wanted to know but were too deaf to ask, 7 Mar 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: White Line Fever (Hardcover)
I didn't expect to agree with everything he wrote, so that's ok.I didn't expect him to remember everything - no problem there. I did want to hear about the bands, the drugs, the women ....... I'm a happy man. More bitchy than Father Ted accepting the Golden Cleric. Less politically correct than David Lee Roth's "Crazy From the Heat", but a refreshing change from the damage case reminiscences of Motley Crue and Aerosmith. If you're reading this, you know who he is and you know what to expect. As someone who stopped reading the sections of the press that interview Motorhead a long time ago, it was good to find out what's been happening to the best band around. Only one quibble - couldn't he have told us about life on the road with Nashville Pussy ?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars 'Overnight Sensation', 28 Oct 2008
By 
richard bailey "rich bailey" (somerset, uk) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: White Line Fever: Lemmy - The Autobiography (Paperback)
As most other reviews have stated, this is an informative run thru' the life of Lemmy; from early days right up to the present and all the mayhem in between.
I was really interested in the amount he had in common [and hung around] with punk bands from the early days, esp The Damned and the Ramones [touring with the former, producing the latter], as well as the obvious metal/rock bands.
He's right though, how many people stopped buying Motorhead records after 'ace of spades'? I know I'm guilty and intend to remedy that by buying a couple of the later ones [probably 1916 and Motorizer unless anyone's got any better suggestions].
An excellent read though and written in a style you'd expect.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The last rock hero, 3 Sep 2003
By 
Edward Teach (Brisbane, Australia) - See all my reviews
This review is from: White Line Fever: Lemmy - The Autobiography (Paperback)
In a world of pop music mediocrity and shameless promotion, Motörhead retain an honest integrity that belies its rough and ready image. That it should matter twenty-five years on is testament to one man, Ian ‘Lemmy’ Kilmister.
This riveting autobiography reveals more about the man than has previously been proffered and for devotees and novices alike, it is written with enough character and drama to keep you enthralled until the end. As you turn the pages your jaw remains firmly upon your chest as time after time you wonder just how Lemmy survived it all. What is evident is that the world is a far richer place for his contribution. One would perhaps expect little coherence or worldly logic after the years of hard rocking, but whilst single-minded and brash, Lemmy’s been-there-seen-it-done-it philosophy is as refreshing as it is often controversial.
There can be no other rock artist around today who has remained so true to his roots, despite the incredible obstacles that have confronted him. His extraordinary story is brutally frank, capturing the wild innocence of youth, the transient formative years and the belief in an ‘honest’ rock n’ roll lifestyle. With stepping stones such as the Rocking Vicars and Hawkwind, Lemmy permits us to draw our own conclusions about his character with candid praise and scathing criticism of those who have crossed his path.
This is raw, unpretentious rock and roll, with no punches pulled. As Lemmy approaches sixty, you are left with the distinct feeling that he has only just got going!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars Riveting read that pulls no punches, 17 April 2003
By A Customer
This review is from: White Line Fever (Hardcover)
Seems as though Lemmy's two main preoccupations in life are sex and music. Real party animal. His book seems to prove the idea that the way to happiness is finding out what your both good at and and enjoy, and then going for it. Also makes for a good anti-hard drug advert, his remarks on needles and heroin are shocking. Exposes some sleazey practices in the music industry. How Lemmy's go on with fans over the years. Even if your not into hard rock, but want to get into the music industry I suspect this book has useful lessons. Overall GOOD STUFF!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining romp through life or legendary rocker, 5 Sep 2003
By 
Lendrick (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: White Line Fever (Hardcover)
Lemmy is rock'n'roll, its difficult to think of anyone else who has so uncomprimsingly lived the life to its full, and we get it all in this warts(!) n all biography. From his early years faking it on his mums guitar through Hawkwind amd Motorheads rise and (relative) fall we get it all.
Lemmy comes of a a likeable and honest if uncopromising character, there is no false modesty about the man but then why should there be. Sex, drugs and Rockn'roll it all here, you will marvel both at the amount of drugs he takes and the number of women he beds. In the end though it is touring and playing which is his driving force which is why he is still at it at 58! There is no doubting the mans love for his music.
Best parts are probably the Hawkwind years and the early Motorhead days. The later years are skimmed over a bit and seem to come down to an endless cycle of switching record companies, managers and band members.
You don't need to be a big Motorhead fan to enjoy this, I'm certainly not. It a witty and entertianing story well told, what more could you ask for?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Controversial but endearing, 2 April 2003
This review is from: White Line Fever (Hardcover)
Having followed Motorhead since 1980, I thought I would love the book and most of it I do. Lemmy takes the reader on a wonderful trip(in some places chemically enhanced)through his life. The early years are very well written and the influence of his early upbringing explains much of his attitudes and opinions. In places moving and always amusing.
The stories remain a fantastic picture of life in the hardest working rock band, tales of the excesses indulged in will make you want to throw away the suit and strap on the guitar.
My only gripe, is that the period 91-02 isn't covered in the same depth as the early years. Whether this is due to the consumption of earlier days ruining his memory or (And this is what I suspect) that the long running battle with the publishers/editors was lost and large chunks were cut probably for legal reasons, I know not.
But to surmise, a wonderful picture of a man totally at ease with the rock and roll lifestyle if less so with the business end of it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rock 'n' Roll deity, modern day Virgil, 20 April 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: White Line Fever: Lemmy - The Autobiography (Paperback)
As Virgil lead Dante through Hell and out the other side, so Lemmy is ourguide on this blast through his life - from his childhood to (almost) thepresent day. Along the way he takes in a large slice of rock-n-rollhistory, all of which he was personally involved in at one time oranother, including Hendrix, Hawkwind, The Damned and his own legendaryband, Motorhead.
We are treated to many and varied stories of sexual and chemical excess,intermingled with his personal thoughts on the music industry, producers,managers, musicians and groupies, all told in his forthright andhillarious style.
Despite - or perhaps because of - everything he's been through, and hasput himself through, Lemmy remains a thoughtful, philisophical character,displaying a deep understanding of the human spirit. He leaves the readeron a high, with the tantalising prospect that there's a lot more yet tocome.
If you are at-all into rock'n'roll or metal and you only ever read oneautobiography, this should be it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 28 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

White Line Fever: Lemmy - The Autobiography
White Line Fever: Lemmy - The Autobiography by Lemmy Kilmister (Paperback - 2 Jun 2003)
£7.99
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews