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73 of 73 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An intriguing insight into the reality of creating wealth
This book exposes the truth behind the great wealth generators of America. Its message however has universal application. Contrary to expectation, real accumulators of wealth don't do any of the things that popular perception would have us believe. They don't have expensive tastes, live in plush houses, drive executive cars or wear the trappings of success. Instead, they...
Published on 16 Jan 2002 by Richard S. Tadman

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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I'd rather not live next door to these people!
After reading this book I would rather not be "The Millionaire Next Door" I think I would prefer living a few streets away because the characters portayed are miserable with no need for such a high net worth. You could summarise the book in a sentence ot two by saying that you do not have to earn a lot in order to bank a million. Live the simple life, don't enjoy anything...
Published on 19 April 2011 by S. THOMSON


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73 of 73 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars An intriguing insight into the reality of creating wealth, 16 Jan 2002
By 
Richard S. Tadman (West Yorkshire, U.K.) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This book exposes the truth behind the great wealth generators of America. Its message however has universal application. Contrary to expectation, real accumulators of wealth don't do any of the things that popular perception would have us believe. They don't have expensive tastes, live in plush houses, drive executive cars or wear the trappings of success. Instead, they budget very carefully and live well within their means, setting aside a sizeable proportion of their income for investment. This book explodes the myth of high earners necessarily becoming rich and supports its assertions with a wealth of detailed statistics. Most millionaires are apparently frugal, well-disciplined in handling their finances and frankly, downright dull! Not the sort of people that warrant a second glance.
Easy to read and enlightening, it may not be too late to change your behaviour and to embark on becoming a Prodigious Accumulator of Wealth (PAW)
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40 of 41 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Makes you feel great if you spend and save carefully, 23 Jan 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Millionaire Next Door (Paperback)
Someone once said, "I made myself wealthy by reducing my wants." That's what this book says. Sure, the content is padded quite a bit, but the message is worth what the book costs, whether you are an shining example of this philosophy or an opponent of it: you can spend or you can have, but most of us can't do both.
I agree with other reviewers' comments that the authors found most wealth was accumulated through operating small and boring businesses in your own neighborhood, yet don't recommend this to their readers (nor do those self-made millionaires, in most cases.) And their research methodology is a bit suspect, since it seems to have presupposed that source of wealth in finding interviewees. Still, I agree with the formulas that describe whether you're building an expected amount of wealth based on your age and income.
Bill Cosby, no financial slouch himself, said "The secret of wealth is ownership." This book gives you plenty of examples to help you believe that. It's not what you spend, but what you save, that gives you real independence. It's encouraging to read (maybe in a masochistic sort of way) that lots of high-earners (doctors and athletes, for instance) blow those high earnings and have little to show for it, living (large) paycheck to paycheck. Others, far less educated and with smaller paychecks, quietly avoid wealth-losing expenses such as flashy cars, big houses, and fancy clothes, to succeed in the only true measure of personal wealth: a high net worth. It isn't what you earn, it's what you keep.
I read the book straight through, hooked on almost every word. Where else can you get inside information on people's personal finances and the decisions that led them to their particular state? Maybe the research wouldn't pass close academic muster, but the individual vignettes are fascinating anyway.
So, negatives aside, I think this book is a must-read. You may fault some aspects of it, but the message is one that everyone should consider, even if you find reasons to ignore its conclusions. And if you're a tightwad, you will rejoice in finding vindication of your choices. But then again, if you're that tight, you'll probably read it from the library anyway!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good clear sensible and it works, 8 April 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: The Millionaire Next Door (Paperback)
For those who say its how to be cheap, what a load of rubbish. Tell me, if you earn 50,000 a year and live off just 40,000 is that being cheap? If you are certain you can start a dot.com and become a multi-millionniare in 6 months fine otherwise you better read this book.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lifelong Freedom of Choice, 27 Aug 1999
By A Customer
If you are a analytical sort with a measure of discipline you will immediately embrace the logic of The Millionaire Next Door. If you are the extroverted "live for today" sort it'll drive you nuts that you have to use patience to be worry free and wealthy. Time and moderation has long been touted as the remedy for many things and that is what is proved in this book as no accountant's spreadsheet ever can...real life. It's a shame so many of use have no choice when we retire and must work in non satisfying jobs to just get by. Trading today for all your tommorrow's isn't a good idea, it'll make you bitter and angry in your old age. If you lack a good measure of disipline don't bother reading the book, you will reject it out of hand. Just don't hang blame on the rest of us because you can't afford your prescriptions when your 70 years old. If you do have some discipline you can change your financial life as I did. After reading this book I climbed out of a credit card nightmare inside of 2 years and have my financial bluprint set for life. I feel back in control and that is a great feeling. Now I can live for today!
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It will change your life, 26 Oct 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The Millionaire Next Door (Paperback)
How do you rate a book? One way is by the impact it has on your life. TMND gets my highest rating, because it is the kind of book that will change your whole way of life (unless you're on the author's track already).
After reading this book, I began dramatically increasing my rate of savings and reducing unnecessary expenses. I will have 5 times the savings at the end of this year that I was on track to have before reading TMND. FIVE TIMES! That's like being paid for four extra years' work in a single year!
I now look at the whole concept of buying things differently; instead of thinking that accumulating possessions is a sign of success, I now realize it's only a hindrance to the accumulation of true wealth and financial security. I am on track to buy a house (no mortgage, I mean BUY) in five years, and still have investments left over.
This book will inspire you to set ambitious financial goals, and then take the steps to reach them. Truly inspirational, it may be the best single investment you can make.
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Brilliant Synopsis of What It Takes To Become Rich, 9 Mar 2010
By 
C. M. Cotton "Chris Cotton" (Europe and USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 100 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Millionaire Next Door (Paperback)
This book, changed my conception of what it was to be wealthy. I always had thought that wealth was represented by Rolls Royce's, Patek Philippe watches, expensive houses etc etc etc. This book will blow your mind, if you believe these things represent wealth.
The premise of the book, is that there are usually 3 kinds of "rich" people, the super rich that can afford the absolute luxuries without problem, the ones who look wealthy, the cars, lifestyle etc, but have nothing in the bank, they are all front, and the ones who are wealthy but live simple non dazzle lifstyles.

What this book teaches the student of wealth, is that to look wealthy is not the same as being wealthy. Looking wealthy is a falacy, that can lead you to finacial ruin. Throughout the book it gives real life examples. What would you prefer a new Rolls Royce, or a 5 year old Rolls but an addtional $50,000 in the bank from the savings you make on buying second hand? The upfront keep up with the Jones's will buy the new one, the true millionaire will buy the older car, and invest the saved capital and make money on the investment. Capital should not be spent, only intrest off the capital should be spent on depreciating luxury items.

This book has changed my life. I lived a life of "luxury" believing that I could afford it. This book gave me a diffrent perspective on wealth, and my competitve spending stopped, and my wealth has soared. I now live 50% under my wage, instead of 100% of my wage. I love saving and investing money, instead of spending. I know that wealth is not about lifestyle, but what is truely in the bank.

The book must be read in conjunction with, The Richest Man In Babylon, The Greatest Salesman in the World and The Science of Getting Rich.

This is a book that could be used by a marketing guru, on how to sell products to the 3 social classes mentioned, or it can be used by the aspiring rich. Used by those who aspire wealth it will show them that flash lifestyles can create finacial ruin. Prudence, sacrafice and wise investing can make a millionaire out of anyone. The keys are in this book.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I'd rather not live next door to these people!, 19 April 2011
By 
S. THOMSON (Scotland) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Millionaire Next Door (Paperback)
After reading this book I would rather not be "The Millionaire Next Door" I think I would prefer living a few streets away because the characters portayed are miserable with no need for such a high net worth. You could summarise the book in a sentence ot two by saying that you do not have to earn a lot in order to bank a million. Live the simple life, don't enjoy anything except work, budgeting and investing in the hope that before your sixty you will be worth a million!...All you will have achieved is financial security as you will be programmed into living a Spartan existence, unable to enjoy the finer things in life that money can provide, What a plan, can't wait!
I will say that this book is still worth a read. I may sound cynical becuase the book paints a depressing picture but there are still some important lessons to learn. Understand that it is not what you earn but what you keep that counts; live below your means; save and invest. The book is geared towards American society and it's dated so I found some sections and all of the tables irrelevant. Personally I would like to read a modern UK version and I would advise all would be millionaires to spend a little of that hard earned cash to make yourself happy and enrich your life. Money should improve your life, not make you a miserable tightwad!
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Phenomenal piece of work, 15 Nov 2009
By 
Mariusz Skonieczny "Author" (classicvalueinvestors com) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Millionaire Next Door (Paperback)
This book sold so many copies because it is just a phenomenal piece of work. When people think of wealthy individuals, they might visualize Donald Trump, who lives a luxurious lifestyle. Most millionaires are not like Trump. They are frugal, they do not drive expensive cars, and they do not live in expansive mansions. Think of Warren Buffett who still lives in the house that he bought for $32,000 in 1957. Those who try to show off wealth are most likely in debt trying to impress everyone else.

Stanley is an expert on the topic of wealthy individuals. He wrote several books on the subject, but this book is phenomenal. It is well researched and easy to read. I highly recommend it.

- Mariusz Skonieczny, author of Why Are We So Clueless about the Stock Market? Learn how to invest your money, how to pick stocks, and how to make money in the stock market
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars It's just common sense, 1 Sep 1999
By A Customer
Reading this book made me feel good about myself, because I've been living these principals intuitively. I am an immigrant from Iran. When I first arrived here as a refugee, I was dirt poor. Being frugal was a necessity not a choice. It was matter of survival. Maybe I was overly fatalistic, but I lived a frugal lifestyle and in time it became habit. I just bought my first house at 36 and will begin investing. I anticipate that I will be a Millionaire in 20 years.
I believe most of the people surveyed in this book, were extreme tightwads that lived miserable lives. The book fails to make a distinction between living frugally yet enjoying Allahs many blessings and being a miserable tightwad of a leech on society. We all must give back something to society, wealth must be kept in circulation to keep the economy strong. Faith and charity are integral to wealth.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Worth the money at this price, 18 Dec 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: The Millionaire Next Door (Paperback)
I agree with many of the previous reviewers that the advice offered in the book is similar to that proferred by Mr Micawber in Dickens's "David Copperfield" - i.e. spend less than you earn. Still, the book is a good read and also offers advice to the young on the most lucrative occupations to follow.
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The Millionaire Next Door
The Millionaire Next Door by William D. Danko (Paperback - 26 Oct 1998)
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