Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop now

Customer Reviews

12
5.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on 29 June 1999
This novel is reputed to be the most popular DS9 novel thus far. It's much deeper and darker than the Ferengi stories you're used to. I run Mr. Shimerman's official website, but my rating of this book is not based on my fandom. THE 34TH RULE is based on a rejected script that was expanded to create this novel. It deals seriously with racism faced by Ferengi, Quark in particular. There is humor, but the Ferengi are not comic relief characters as they're usually portrayed. Quark and Rom end up in a torture camp, while the DS9 crew fights a war. I shed a lot of tears reading this book. The writing is superb, and I promise you won't be disappointed.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 3 August 2001
I am biased towards Star Trek books and this beauty was intended for tv. Luckily the producers didn't want it and so it became a book in the skilled hands of David George (Armin contributed to the idea, not the writing; it is my understanding that he wasn't too happy about his name put on first). Because they could make a book out of it, the storyline has been worked out to greater detail. To avoid spoilers I will just tell the theme: if someone believes in something you think that isn't worth believing in, think again. In this case the Bajoran religion (a standard spiritual one) is pitched against the Ferengi religion whose god is profit. According to the bajoran Kira that is no real religion, so she is offended when Quark will not disregard his faith. This plays not totally in the foreground but it is what this is really all about. George David did a great thing by doing this theme interwoven in the story instead of pushing it in your face. It is right along there with that other Star Trek gem 'A stitch in time' by Andrew J. Robinson.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 2 March 1999
In the 34TH RULE, Armin Shimermann and David George have crafted the finest DS9 story ever told in any medium, be it television or novels. This is the novel that, even if you hate DS9, you will love to read; it works at a frantic pace and deals with deep matters in a rational way. This is the ultimate Quark story; here Quark isn't the bumbling fool he's been portrayed as for so long on the series, instead we see him as a character with real dramatic potential who is put into the middle of an explosive situation and has to find a way to survive and overcome. Simultaneously, the novel returns us to the political maneuverings on Bajor which have fallen by the wayside on the series and deal with the political climate adroitly. If you haven't bought this book yet, you'd be well-served if you did, and you'll thank me for it later.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 30 January 1999
The 34th Rule looks at first like any other Star Trek novel, until you open it up and see that it is both longer and denser than most others. The reason for this becomes apparent once you begin to read the book: there is a lot here, both in quantity and quality. The complex plot the writers weave requires all 425 pages to unfold and resolve, and those pages are a joy to read. The characters, settings, and situations are brought to life with beautiful use of the language, and I know I would have loved this book even if I were not a Star Trek fan. The 34th Rule is a "must read" not only for DS9 and Trek fans in particular, but for science fiction fans--and fans of good writing--in general.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 28 July 1999
I don't generally read the DS9 novels, but read this one based on the overwhelming number of positive reviews I had heard. The reviews were right - this was a great Trek book, not just a wonderful DS9 book. I particularly liked how the authors got deep inside the characters' heads, so if you're into detailed characterizations, this book is for you! I was also glad the the Ferengi weren't portrayed as bumbling idiots, as they often are on the show.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 13 June 1999
This was a great Star Trek novel, besides Kira being pretty mean to Quark, and the few mispellings and grammer problems near the end of the book. But this was a great novel. The longest Star Trek book I've read so far (425 pages.), most of the characters were described good, there was a bit of a mystery with what was actually going on with the Bajorians and Frenigie. If your a DS9 Fan you'll love the 34th Rule!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 12 June 1999
I loved this book so much, I re-read it several times!! Kira isn't that horrible to Quark on the series, so it was a bit much for her to slag him off like that. But everything else was perfect!! I honestly think it should be turned into an hour-long special episode, as it is definately the best ST book I have ever read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 6 March 1999
This is the first Non-original Star Trek book I have ever read, and I finished it wanting to watch an episode because the character interaction and development was that good. A great first novel for me to read in the DS9 universe. I hope Mr. Schimmerman & Mr. George collaborate on more to come.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 21 January 1999
Ferengi and Bajorans on the brink of intersteller war with the crew of DS9 caught in the middle, and Quark and Rom interned in a prison camp. Suspense, action, excellent pacing, and well drawn characters. This is an extremely well written and thoroughly engrossing book.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 28 March 1999
The 34th rule is a very good book for trekkies, with all the appropriate references. The section describing the prison camp is worthy of some of the better thriller authors since it really sends chills up a spine. All in all a real 5 star read.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Stitch in Time (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)
Stitch in Time (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) by Andrew Robinson (Mass Market Paperback - 5 Jun. 2000)

Star Trek - the Next Generation: Reunion
Star Trek - the Next Generation: Reunion by Jan Michael Friedman (Mass Market Paperback - 1 Aug. 1992)
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.