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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PF's early experience in the US is as IN-credible
Much has been said about how fake her China stories are. Here is a copy of what I wrote about her early US experience in Amazon.com.

*************(For your amusement, 2/13/2013) This will be the latest and hopefully last addition. Some of the stories in this "memoir" are too entertaining and too comical not to share.

----
TITLE: My First Days,...
Published on 19 Mar. 2013 by Joe Y

versus
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Full of contraditory fabrications mixed with a lot of high-minded talking
If I could give 0 star to this book, I would. A memoir is supposed to tell what really happened, and occasional inaccuracies are OK. But this one is full of fabrications. When I read the first half of this book, I found most of the pages are either big direct lies or small things against common sense. The second half is more focused on business but it is just plain...
Published 16 months ago by American Citizen


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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars PF's early experience in the US is as IN-credible, 19 Mar. 2013
By 
Joe Y (Blacksburg, VA United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
Much has been said about how fake her China stories are. Here is a copy of what I wrote about her early US experience in Amazon.com.

*************(For your amusement, 2/13/2013) This will be the latest and hopefully last addition. Some of the stories in this "memoir" are too entertaining and too comical not to share.

----
TITLE: My First Days, in the US of A

ABSTRACT: A Chinese Woman Landed in Albuquerque of USA, into a Soviet Prison with Three Child Inmates, Gift of a Chinese-speaking Viet Cong-victimized Refuge.

STORY LINE (Condensed from excerpt freely available on Amazon, click on the book icon): A wife walks out on her husband and their three children. The man needs a baby sitter if he goes to work. He drives to the airport and abducts a woman. He locks her up in his apartment as a babysitter. The police come and rescue her from captivity after three days. This woman is..... none other than our now (in)famous extraordinaire heroine.

DECONSTRUCTION: Oh yeah, what man looking for a babysitter would not thinking of going to the airport and kidnapping a woman fresh off the plane. You must be insane if you don't recognize the brilliance of this man's brain. I am sure he just wakes up in the morning and voila, he has a plan: today, I will drive to the Albuquerque Airport and kidnap the most extraordinary woman to babysit my three (somewhat retarded) children. I would give her some cookies and she would take care of my lovely children for however long with those cookies. It would be so much safer to lock up my children with a stranger I kidnap than by themselves. Oh, yeah, this will work beautifully because the law says you can't leave young children by themselves. I can't do that as a law abiding citizen! Who says a loving father can't trust a stranger to take care of his children, especially if he knows that the stranger had been a parent at the tender age of 3 to her 4 year old younger sister (sorry , I don't know what younger means as I only know three English words "hello, help and thank you"). My children of a few years old are so easy, smart and funny. They would immediately call this woman "Mama" and cling to her big and fat lies (oh, wait, I mean legs). What a great father I am! With this wonder woman as the babysitter, I can work then for however many days and not return. (Lessons learned by me: Next time, my wife threatens to leave me and my baby, I will tell her: "Yeah, you do that. I will drive to Roanoke Airport and pick up a newly arrived Chinese woman. Our baby will call her Mama in no time". That will teach her!)

What an apartment it was in the center of Albuquerque! It has concrete floors, windows up high, and metal bar not to allow the red sand of the desert in. The doors are so amazing and a paddle lock is all you need to lock anyone in. Those government subsidized apartments are so well build and so isolated, nobody would hear people scream. How wonderful these living quarters are! Every UNM professor should be provided one so they can lock their students in :)

What a bunch of characters too! There was this Chinese man conveniently behind the ticket counter (or was that a ticket vendor?) as an interpreter at the SF airport. There was this kind and probably handsome American (oh, I am sure he is not black) standing behind her rear end with a $5 bill. There was this Vietnamese-Chinese law-abiding immigrant in government low income housing with a paddle lock. There were the two burly NM policemen busting into a Soviet prison. No, these are not stereotypical, these are just typical Americana! Oh, did I mention this kind $5 man was an accomplice of the communist Chinese government in sending her to exile in NM? Oh, yeah, I am sure all these happened. Eh, one more thing, by the heroine's logic, this Vietnamese-Chinese is in a US labor camp in the center of Albuquerque. It is after all a government controlled apartment without hardwood floor and a refrigerator!

--------Other funny itty bitty to share
1. The heroine said in her own words she witnessed multiple incidences of infanticides with her own eyes in an interview with Sir Evans. Now imagine that! Imagine someone witnessing the few seconds of a female infanticide in action with her own eyes, imagine she did it multiple times, then imagine the perpetrators are parents, relatives and committee members (whatever that means). Forget about these Chinese barbarians as human beings. I am sure they are not that kind of animal with thousands of years of civilization. Just imagine what type of character you have to be in order to run into someone tossing babies into rivers, some even with umbilical cords attached, in remote villages and countryside. What do you come up with? Dark, faceless, invisible, shadowless and shapeless souls roaming around the dark skies, smelling blood and imminent death? Lord of the Ring? Harry Potter? Star Wars and Darth Vader?

2. English, oh, English, English is a funny business. We park on our driveway and drive on the parkway! Now imagine this: a father sends his daughter to America penniless but armed with three words: Hello, Help and Thank You. What kind of life is the father envisioning for her daughter in the US of A!? Yeah, which loving father wouldn't prepare her angel so thoroughly, especially an Engineering professor with an MIT degree (this was leaked by the heroine in an interview with Taiwanese news media). With such cultured sets of parents, of course, they would think that English is so trivial in American. No worries, everybody there speaks Chiglish. Penniless, no worries, we will feed you a lavish meal (with pictures to prove it in the book) to send you off and it should be good for months. Besides, Shanghai Mama has prepared a can of your favorite dish (Shanghai Mama, how cute! Why not Dancing With the Wolf? Calling someone adopted parents is so lame, America!). You can take it with you and even share it with those stray kittens on the Albuquerque street corners (I mean, if not for the kidnapping, where would she stay when penniless or $5 in the red? There is another story line: a kind American let her sleep in the master bedroom). Besides, you can wait table and babysit kids. The no working rules for student visa holder? Don't worry, the US is the land of the free and the home of the brave. When you interview for a babysitter. Don't forget to mention that you are so good with children that the first time they see you they will call you Mama!

*******************

ADDENDUM (2/8/13):

Could you imagine if someone, for money and fame, had perpetuated and published outlandish tales along with the collective story of the horrific experiences of all Holocaust survivors as one's own! I can't even find words to describe how ungodly such a despicable act would be to the real survivors and the millions who perished! Please, please do not tell me you are honoring them with your lies! (In response to the allusion that the author is feeling like a Holocaust survivor reliving the nightmares of the Holocaust. How shameless and outrageous! Dear readers, please also ask yourself why the very survivors of CR who now live in the US have come out in droves to question the authenticity of the author's story. If one were dare to substitute CR with Holocaust, God Forbid, who would you believe, the story teller or the survivors? This enrages me).

I suggest "Red Scarf Girl: A Memoir of the Cultural Revolution" by Ji-li Jiang which is still available on Amazon.
***************************(more stars for the heroine:)

ADDENDUM (2/5/13):

There have been a few promoters of this so-called "Memoir" in the last couple of days. Common threads in their "reviews" include labeling the critics as agents of the Chinese government propaganda machine, Chinese patriots ashamed of their country's history of the Cultural Revolution, or even computer robots under China's control. In reality, these critics are human being of flesh and blood; most have advanced degrees from reputable US universities and they reside in the States by choice and for the love of this country; there is little love lost between them and the Chinese government, past or present.

Still raw, however, are their memories of being force-fed stories of manufactured heroes and other kinds and even being forced to lie for survival while in China before, during and after the cultural revolution (CR). Countless lives were lost during the infamous famine right before CR. Yet, the author described a lavish life style in Shanghai even when all the communist leaders at the highest levels were cutting their own food rations. Many who lived through CR are rightly incensed by the story for her blatant fabrications and fact bending. The emotional response by many may be rooted in the feeling that her imaginative ordeal so very much cheapens the real suffering of millions during that very dark period of China's history.

There is a telling sign about these positive reviews as rarely have their authors disputed the charges of falsehood of the story. Instead, many attempt to discredit the messengers based on the Chineseness of their names. While they are quick to insinuate the connection between the critics and the Chinese government, at least a few never disclosed their close ties with the authors or the authors' interest when they obviously existed.

I personally find the whole episode to be comical and sad at the same time. The comical part should be obvious from my glowing 5-star review. I am sad because many in the US and the media worldwide so readily accepted her tall and outlandish tales for reasons deep in their psych; I am sad because I believe that this Chinese woman, with similar experiences with many of us growing up, needs professional help of a different kind from what she is paying or provided for.

------------------Original Comment (2/3/2013)
This heroine's American experience started with a UA flight from Shanghai to SF that didn't exist at that time (January, 1984). The Chinese government was sending her to NM for intentions unknown to her. Yet they were so considerate to give her a traveler's check so she could buy a ticket from SF to NM. She was so obedient that the first thing she did in the land of the free was to use the money for a flight from SF to Albuquerque.

At the airport in NM, she was picked up by a strange Vietnamese-Chinese man who kept her captive for 3 days. She was then rescued by police and sent to her school she didn't know she was supposed to attend. In about half a year, she mastered English, got into a graduate program in literature at UNM, figured out the poor employment prospect with such a degree, heard a professor talk about Asian grad students not connecting with American culture by not starting at the undergrad level and decided to start her education anew as a freshman, applied to UCSD and started her computer science program there in the Fall.

Now the story gets even better. In the same Fall, the same woman took a seat on a driftwood log on the beach at Del Mar and looked out to sea. A man named Len Sherman with a software company happened to walk by and started the conversation by "Why so pensive, young lady?". She was hired as a programmer just a few weeks into her freshman year by this entrepreneur. This man begged her to stay in his company and offered her a 5% stake in his company worth millions, but this brilliant woman turned him down. Instead, she moved across the country to work as a technician at Bell Labs in Illinois after finishing her degree in two years at UCSD (1986). But that made sense because it was all part of a more grandiose plan to get a doctoral degree from UIUC and to mentor a freshman named Marc Andreessen, who would develop Mosaic at her suggestion.....

So, what an American experience to start your new life! I didn't make any of these stuff up. They are all here in the Feature Article by John Brant "Entrepreneur of the Year: Ping Fu" ([Apparently, Amazon doesn't allow links to other sites, but a Google search easily locates the article]).

IN-credible stories, indeed! What if one's nose could really grow longer as Pinocchio's?
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Full of contraditory fabrications mixed with a lot of high-minded talking, 21 Nov. 2013
By 
American Citizen (United States Of America) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
If I could give 0 star to this book, I would. A memoir is supposed to tell what really happened, and occasional inaccuracies are OK. But this one is full of fabrications. When I read the first half of this book, I found most of the pages are either big direct lies or small things against common sense. The second half is more focused on business but it is just plain boring. This Ping Fu story is such a big messy lie at the scale that is beyond anything I have read so far (and I hope no lie ever passes this one in my life).

Some people may like this memoir as it contains a lot of high-minded inspirational talking, as Ping Fu portrayed herself as a victim of cruelty and adversity who showed enormous resilience and survived by sheer means of her humbleness and unbreakable spirit. But the truth is she fabricated these touching stories to take advantage of people's kindness in order to gain fame and financial benefit. After reading both of her English and Chinese memoirs, her 4 resumes, and Suzhou (Soochow) University's disclosure of her student registration form (including her own handwritten statement that she joined the Communist Youth League in 1973), it is easy to see there are many contradictions. Here is an incomplete list of the contradictions:

- Some stories in this book didn't happen, such as a teacher being quartered by 4 horses. Ping Fu admitted it was her emotional memory.
- Finger checking on college female students: in this book it was by Suzhou University officials' fingers. In February 2013 Ping Fu blamed her ghostwriter Meimei Fox for getting it wrong, and said what she meant was it was done by the students' own fingers. In July 2013 she admitted that the finger-checking practice didn't happen on college campus.
- In this book she wrote her college thesis caused embarrassment to the Chinese government which had her arrested. In later interviews she admitted she didn't write a college thesis..
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu was kidnapped in Albuquerque the first day she arrived in America and was locked up for 3 days. In her Chinese memoir she had a dinner with her first boyfriend Kelly on the third day of arrival to America. Albuquerque Police Department does not have any record related to this kidnapping incident even though it allegedly involved 3 little children.
- In this book she didn't graduate from Suzhou University, but in her resumes which were submitted to the National Science Foundation (NSF, a government agency), she earned a BA or a Master's degree from Suzhou University.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu was arrested in 1982 and imprisoned for 3 days, after that she was under house arrest and was asked to leave China. But in her resumes, she graduated from Suzhou University, and then worked at the Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics as a lecturer from 1982 - 1983.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu's marriage to Dr. Herbert Edelsbrunner was her only marriage, but in February 2013 she admitted to NYT reporter Didi Tatlow that she got green card from her first marriage with Richard Lynn Ewald from 1986 - 1989.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu suffered a lot in China. In her Chinese memoir she had a happy childhood in China, but suffered a lot in America.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu worked in a restaurant in Santa Fe where John Wayne also visited as a customer at that time, but in reality John Wayne died 5 years before Ping Fu came to America in 1984.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu described Sylvester Stallone as "a large, muscular man with dark hair and an asymmetrical face,"who grabbed her rear end with his enormous right hand, but in reality Stallone is not large, he does not have enormous right hand either.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu didn't see herself for 10 years from 8 to 18, but she included photos during that time in the book.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu couldn't afford a mirror, but she had a bike, which was a luxury item at that time.
- In this book Lane Sharman's company was acquired by AT&T, but Mr. Lane Sharman said his company was never acquired by AT&T.
- In this book Ms. Ping Fu said she did graduate studies at UNM, but UNM said she only did undergraduate studies there.

---------------------------------

Below is what Suzhou University has disclosed:

In June 2013, Soochow (Suzhou) University released Ping Fu's student file, which revealed the the following:

(1) According to Ping Fu's student registration card which she filled in her own handwriting, Ping Fu had a complete middle/high school education. She graduated from Middle School in 1973. She graduated from the Nanjing Guanghuamen High School in July 1976. (Note: In her book Bend Not Break, Ms. Ping Fu wrote that she worked in factory from 8 to 18 years old, never went to school during those 10 years.)

(2) Also according to Ms. Ping Fu's student registration card which she filled in her own handwriting, Ms. Ping Fu joined the Communist Youth League in 1973. (Note: the political ladder at that time in China was: Little Red Soldier, Red Guard, member of the Communist Youth League, member of the Communist Party. But in Ms. Ping Fu's Bend Not Break she wrote that she suffered miserably because she was a "black element." This is like a Nazi soldier claimed she suffered more than Jewish people during Holocaust.)

(3) Still according to Ms. Ping Fu's student registration card which she filled in her own handwriting, Ms. Ping Fu worked in Nanjing Radio Equipment Manufacture only for one year after she graduated from high school.

(4) Ms. Ping Fu took two years of college English and received good grades. (Note: In her book Bend Not Break she wrote she only knew 3 English words when she arrived in America in 1984.)

(5) Ms. Ping Fu was never arrested for any reason while she was at Soochow University.

(6) Ms. Ping Fu withdrew from Soochow University on Mar 16, 1982.

---------------------------------
Four of Ping Fu's resumes were obtained by the critics of Ping Fu through FOIA. They were used to apply a job at National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) or taxpayer funded government NSF grants. Every version of her resumes includes her fabricated education credentials or working experience, and they conflict with each other in timing. Here is an incomplete list of the problems of her resumes.

- Ping Fu was not a TA at University of New Mexico. (UNM searched their record and did not find Ping Fu was a TA there. In her memoir Bend Not Break Ping Fu wrote she did babysitting, house keeping and restaurant job to support herself while attending UNM, but in her resume she was a TA at UNM.)
- Ping Fu never attended University of San Diego, but in her resume she was a TA there.
- RA at UCSD is in question. (I only heard graduate students work as RAs, and never heard an undergraduate student worked as RA. In her memoir Bend Not Break, Ping Fu Ping Fu did not mention she was an RA at UCSD, but in her resume she listed an RA job at UCSD while doing undergraduate study there.)
- Ping Fu did not receive any degree from Suzhou University, but she listed BA and MA degrees from Suzhou University in her resumes.
- Her working as lecturer at Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics in 1982 - 1983 could not possibly be true, as NUAA is a semi-military college, and lecturer is a formal title in China which requires at least a Bachelor degree and formal approval process. Since Ping Fu did not graduate from college, it is impossible for her to be a lecturer at the prestigious college NUAA. (In Bend Not Break, she was under house arrest after being released from a jail during that time.)
- From April 1991 - August 1994, Ping Fu was a Visiting Research Programmer at NCSA, and she was not a Senior Research Programmer.
- Ping Fu's Technical Programming Manager position did not start from April, 1991. Actually this title was given to Ping Fu in 1996.
- It is impossible for Ping Fu to work as a Software Consultant at Resource Systems Group in San Diego starting in May 1984. (UNM stated Ping Fu enrolled as a full time student from Jan. 1984 - June 1986. Ping Fu arrived America in Jan. 1984 and enrolled in English as second language program at UNM. But in her resume she started to work in San Diego for Resource Systems Group in May 1984.)

With these four resumes, the timing of Ping Fu's working experience with Resource Systems Group changed as follows:
- In her 1992 resume: from July 1986 - June 1988
- In her 1997 resume: from May 1985 - June 1988
- In her 1999 resume: from May 1984 - June 1988
- In her 1991 resume: Ping Fu was doing TA at UNM, from 1985 - 1986 (she worked in two different states at the same time while on student Visa.)

Ping Fu has 3 versions of her story regarding Suzhou University:
- In Bend Not Break, no degree from Suzhou University was obtained.
- In her 1991 resume, BA from Suzhou University, China in March, 1982.
- In her 1999 resume, MA from Suzhou University, China in March, 1982.

Suzhou University published her school record showing that she withdrew from that school on March 16, 1982 without any degree earned. But in each of her 4 resumes, she put either BA or MA degree. Using falsified resumes to apply for government jobs or grants is not just a lie, it is a crime. Because of the statute of limitation, we tax payers probably could not do anything about her criminal act, but this kind of behavior should be condemned.

There are also a lot of fabrications in Ping Fu's online profiles. It would take a book to list all the contradictions (lies) of her different versions of stories.

If anyone still wants to read this book, read it as a fiction. It is not a memoir.
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42 of 49 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars To Dr B Clayton, would you please stop misleading other readers, 31 Jan. 2013
By 
Hello Dr B Clayton. I just noticed that you are a TOP 1000 REVIEWER on Amazon platform, and realize that my hidden comment is not respectful enough considering your impact. So I re-paste my words here to make them visible to you.

+++

Hello friend. To correct your mistake of stating "No better book was published in 2012", I recommend you read the comments under this title on Amazon.com, by Chinese people who all know what can and cannot happen in China. Then you will find out by yourself that 150 persons give this title one star simply because they cannot mark anything lower than one star in Amazon system.

http://www.amazon.com/Bend-Not-Break-Life-Worlds/dp/1591845521

Ping Fu is absolutely smart, or, clever, and with high enough EQ to fool U.S. immigration system as well as Forbes that all media that acclaim her book (I'd rather use FICTION here). Her biggest mistake is that now she is trying to go back to China and fool Chinese. Do you know why so many Chinese rushed in Amazon and tried their best to disclose this liar? Because we Chinese in China have suffered enough of a society where honesty is seldom honored and liars take all. We IMAGINE that in advanced countries things should be different.

By disclosing Ping Fu, we are not defending the Cultural Revolution or Mao or CCP. Persons like I, who write down these words with strange English (surely as you'll feel) in hope to convey the common sense and facts to foreigners, are somehow trying to defend our belief that liars should not be rewarded for lying, and that virtues like honesty should not be insulted so easily.

If you understand my points, please take back your comment so that it will not mislead others. Frankly, you deserve a refund. Ping Fu has lied so much that it is impossible to tell which part is truth. There might be truth in her story, but what inspiration can you get without knowing where the truth lies?

And I was only too astonished to find your remark "With a team, Ping Fu then created what became Netscape, the first web browser that opened up the internet to millions. Her life in fact is an embodiment of the American dream."

As a professional in digital advertising and PR industry, I sincerely advise you read ANY book about IT development history before attributing Netscape to Ping Fu.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ping Fu is not lying. She is very ill., 4 Mar. 2013
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
Many of the stories that Ping Fu told in this book and in many video interviews are so bizarre that they exceed the wildest imaginations a sane individual could ever be able to dream of. It all began after a session of hyponsis in 2005, according to herself. A lot of reviewers have been trying very hard to reason with her and telling her that those events were not possible. But I think everybody is wasting his/her time because she is not lying. She genuinely believes she is telling the truth. Otherwise with her intelligence she should have fabricated much more credible stories had she wanted to lie. She certainly wouldn't have needed to use the photo of her posing happily under the 'Red Guards' banner as a proof of her being in a 'forced labour camp'. So my conclusion is that she is very ill and therefore her weird memories are kind of understandable.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good, 24 April 2014
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I saw the author interviewed on BBC News, which is what made me want to read her full story. She has experienced very tough periods in her life and although had little early education has driven herself to be very successful in the USA, when it could have been so different. I learned a lot - I knew little of Maoist China before reading this. It certainly held my attention, made me count my blessings and look to strive to do more in my own life. There are better written books, but many are not true stories, this one is a very personal story made more so in the way she tells it and also by what she omits.
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35 of 42 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars so fake, 29 Jan. 2013
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
Her story about her experiences in China is so fake. Anyone who has some knowledge about the history during that period can easily tell that it's a totally fake story. She wouldn't be able to get into a university in China at that time if she didn't have a politically "good" background. Going to America was a dream of every Chinese back then. Everyone would conduct such a crime if the penalty was to be deported to America.

It's also funny that the group picture on fastcompany.com/3004166/bend-not-break-leadership-lessons-resilience-amid-struggle shows that she herself was a member of Mao's Red Guard. She must have had a good time during China's Cultural Revolution and then got into a university due to her "good" performance within the Red Guard.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The most misleading book of the year, 14 Feb. 2013
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
I was in China during the cultural revolution and I can tell this book is full of bold faced lies.
I quote here a paragraph of The Guardian's article: "Critics acknowledge the horrors of the cultural revolution, but question Fu's personal account. She has already conceded that a description of Red Guards killing a teacher by tying their victim to four horses was an "emotional memory" and probably wrong. Closer examination of her book and interviews reveal numerous conflicting claims and experts told the Guardian several parts of her story were implausible."
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Feel totally cheated, 27 Feb. 2013
By 
J. Ballantyne (West Sussex) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
2/3 of the way through this book I discovered that Ping Fu is not what she makes out. Very angry I wasted my money and that I have been duped. This is fantasy not fact. I am just finishing the book, but everything she writes I now doubt. Check out what is written in the Guardian and elsewhere on line.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is full of lies, cash grab greedy and insult to real culture reveolution victims, 12 April 2013
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
This book is a joke to any one with Chinese background. But the success of this book and its author shows the whole story is not that funny. It appeals to people in western society who has no knowledge of Chinese modern history and tries to build a fairy tale of American style success. (Of course, don't forget to buy 3D Systems stock, because 3D printing is another fantasy tale she wants to sell)

For those who really think that this is a true story, please answer this question:
Do you know the book by Misha: A Mémoire of the Holocaust Years? Why it took 10 years to reveal it is full of lies?

Please remember, fabricating a story about Chinese culture revolution is as serious as fabricating Holocaust story in western society.
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20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A biography based on piles of lies ..., 8 Feb. 2013
This review is from: Bend, Not Break: A Life in Two Worlds (Paperback)
Although I was one of those kids who were deprived their 'happy childhood' because of cultural revolution, I still condemn author's shameless lies in the book and throughout her interviews. History should be told, but not through lies.
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