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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How the Great War was won, 13 Nov. 2013
This review is from: Hundred Days: The End of the Great War (Hardcover)
The British like to read about military disasters; the more mud, blood and incompetence that surrounds an operation, the more engrossing the story. That is why 'Hundred Days' is such an important book, for it is the complete antidote to the literary diet of slaughter and despair that typifies so many Great War studies. Nick Lloyd does an admirable job in taking us through the setbacks but also the triumphs of the final months of the War when mobility and all-arms cooperation were the bywords for British tactics.

The author has trawled through archives from all sides in the conflict and his thorough examination of German documents has yielded a pitiful story of crushed German morale, starvation and collapse from within. Lloyd accepts these facts but is quick to dispel the 'stab in the back' theory promoted by subsequent German militarists (and the odd Dictator). He points out that victory came in the end to the Allies, not just through sheer weight of American intervention, but also from British ingenuity and the valour and tenacity of British soldiers. Sadly, the mission of crushing German territorial ambition once and for all, was not completed in 1918. That failure could not be laid at the door of Tommy Atkins, whose achievements Lloyd justly praises. He writes well and with authority. This is highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Last Struggle of Despair, 28 Aug. 2014
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This review is from: Hundred Days: The End of the Great War (Hardcover)
We will see a proliferation of books on all aspects of the Great War over the next 4 years. Some excellent, some bad. Nick Lloyd's book on the Last Hundred Days, is nearly the excellent end of the spectrum.
Lloyd has perhaps one of the best books on the Battle of Loos to his name and he tries manfully to tell the story of the final victory by referencing all sides.....German, French, British Empire, and American. This is not an operational history of the last 95 days of the war (From the Battle of Amiens to the Armistice) but rather a construction and explanation of how the war ended.
The insights he provides into the collapse of the German political will is particularly useful as this is often skipped over in many histories.
He clearly sets out how the destruction of the German Armies on the Western Front come about, clearly detailing the great cost to all sides as the Germans sought to blunt an Allied offensive that, for the first time in the war, truly bought together an "all arms" fighting force to the battlefield....one that had been only hinted at during the Messines and Cambrai battles in the previous year.
He pays due respect to the French and American victories at the Marne and St Mihiel, but also explains how the army of the British Empire was responsible for most of the "Black Days" suffered by the German Army during this period, despite facing the bulk of the German army.
Highly readable and recommended.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 14 Nov. 2013
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The choice of the days was excellent...it brought in the Austrians, the Russians and the Middle East and the Balfour Declaration all in a very readable fashion. I must read more on the war in the Middle East and Mesopotamia.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Did anyone really care whether Alsace-Lorraine was...", 28 Jan. 2014
By 
Jill Meyer (United States) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Hundred Days: The End of the Great War (Hardcover)
"Did anyone really care whether Alsace-Lorraine was French or German?" Using those words, British history professor Nick Lloyd summed up German thoughts at the end of the "Great War" as the German government considered surrendering to the Allied forces in Fall, 1918, in his new book, "Hundred Days".

August 1914 - young men from Britain to Austro-Hungary marched gaily off to war. They'd be home by Christmas, these fearless young men told themselves - and each other. But as the years went by with battles gaining literally inches and men living - and dying - in hideous trenches in France and Belgium, by summer of 1918, the war was finally creaking to an end. The American entry into the war in 1917 on the Allied side had given the French, British, and Dominion troops an added boost to those armies who had been fighting for three years, often to a standoff with the Germans on the Western Front, in a war of attrition.

Nick LLoyd, a senior lecturer of Defense Studies, at Kings College, London, lost a great-uncle at the French village of Gouzeaucourt, just six weeks or so before the Armistice. Lloyd has written an amazingly readable book about those last hundred days of WW1. He looks at the war from British, German, French, and American sides and examines both the military battles at the Front and the political battles behind the scenes. He includes maps at the front of the book which detail the battles fought and military lines that had to be crossed by the advancing Allies and defended by the Germans.

One of the most interesting parts of the book deals with the political situation in Germany as the war caused the collapse of the Kaiser's government. Lloyd looks at the cries of "betrayal by the Communists/Bolshevics/Jews/Defeatists" that lasted well into the 1920's and '30's. Nick LLoyd has done a wonderful job looking at a smallish slice of time in a much larger conflict. Great book for WW1 history readers.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The bit that is usually left out., 5 Dec. 2013
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I came across the idea of the Hundred Days when I was reading material my grandfather had collected. The nature and reasons for the stalemate are so well known but the detail of how it was broken is not nearly so well covered.

the germans did not just shuffle off and one vaguely imagines. They had to be ejected at heavy cost from every foot of territory but now we had the tools to do the job. A conventional opinion would be that the Germans would have finally disintegrated the following spring if the war had not ended.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Hundred Days, 13 July 2014
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Tinatwosocks (Wigan (UK spiritual home of Rugby League) - See all my reviews
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This was a great book for the layman, tho no doubt the purists will pick it to bits. However, I being one of the many who are probably only aware of the rudimentary aspects of WWI, I found the book fascinating, particularly as this book describes the final days, and the Allies change of tactics to end the static trench warfare and move on to bring a result to this terrible conflict. Definitely recommend this book to anyone who has either only a passing interest in this period, or the full blown specialist.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "An immensely readable, clear and well supported narrative", 2 July 2014
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This book is worthy of 5 stars if only because it occupies a very narrow field of historical research. Ask any historian how the 'Great War' ended and most will be surprisingly vague. Some will say the Allies were made stronger by the entry of the USA into the war, some will say that resistance in Germany collapsed on the home front and undermined the German military's ability to wage war, some will say that exhausted armies ran out of steam. Very few, and it is literally a handful by my estimation have actually researched the period between the failure of the German Army's Spring Offensive and the collapse of the Western Front between August and November.

To that end Nick Lloyd has performed a great service to this period of history by creating an immensely readable, clear and well supported narrative (by the evidence he employs) of the success of the Allies over the German army on the Western Front in those last months of the war. Far from the nebulous and vague explanations for the end of WWI hitherto offered he explains how by a combination of tactics and logistics the Allies could fairly claim a military victory over the central powers.

Lloyds case is bolstered by eye witness account unearthed in his research from both sides of the conflict. It is true that defeatism spread in the German Army and indeed the constitutional changes which lead to the end of the monarchy and military ruling class were crucial to the decision to seek armistice but he lays out the facts that the German Army had all but disintegrated except in small pockets of resistance after several well planned and executed campaigns. It took over 4 years to break the deadlock on the Western Front and dislodge the German Army from its monopoly of strong defensive positions but it is undeniable that better planning, better weapons and superior tactics succeeded in defeating the German Army.

This conclusion may surprise you and indeed possibly the most important point in Lloyd's book comes in the introduction. The lack of historical research, even in the immediate aftermath of the war and during the increasingly turbulent 1930s helped create two dangerous myths with catastrophic consequences for the remainder of the 20th century. Firstly, the myth that the German army was not defeated in 1918 which lead to festering resentment amongst the population and clearly aided the rise of Nazi militarism in the 1930s. And, secondly - the most dangerous assertion - that it was the 'Bolsheviks and Jews' who 'stabbed Germany in the back' by their nefarious conspiracies that 'forced' the Armistice in November 1918 on the German army. In the absence of emphatic evidence like this book to demonstrate the military defeat of Germany by the Allies these two turbulent myths helped to encourage the twin evils and Nazism and Appeasement.
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4.0 out of 5 stars A WW1 period few are really aware of...., 7 Jun. 2014
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After the sucesses of the German Army in the "Michael" offensive of March1918, where Allied forces were driven back miles to the very gates of Amiens, how did the offensive run out of steam seemingly on the verge of a German victory.
Mr Lloyd covers why the German army (and nation) were unable to take advantage of their gains, how the Aliies re-organised,
and were able to counter attack on August 8th 1918. Just 95 days later the Great War was over and this book does what it says
and goes some way to explain the armistice did not lead to a lasting peace.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Read, 2 Dec. 2014
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A very interesting read very informative. A detailed description of the last days of WW1.
It is of interest to anyone who is researching the war. It is also a good read
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 28 April 2015
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Well written and full of interesting stuff about a period I knew very little about.
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Hundred Days: The End of the Great War
Hundred Days: The End of the Great War by Nick Lloyd (Hardcover - 7 Nov. 2013)
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