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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly recommended!
Tricia Wastvedt has taken some time to follow up on her successful debut novel 'The River', but her second book is worth the wait. 'The German Boy' is a thoughtful and beautifully crafted novel, set in the years between 1927 and 1947, when the tragedy of the Great War still lingers, and new threats and challenges impact the lives of the characters.
This is the story...
Published on 30 May 2011 by Pen Leigh

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Well-written family saga
In lots of ways this book was very different from what I expected. At heart, this is a family between-the-wars saga circulating between various families - Karen and Elizabeth Oliver, Rachel and Michael Ross (whose father Englished their name from the Jewish Roth), and the bohemian , avant-garde Americans congregated around Francesca Brion. The girls, Karen, Elizabeth and...
Published on 16 July 2011 by Roman Clodia


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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The German Boy and his Family, 14 Jun. 2011
By 
TMUK (UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The German Boy (Paperback)
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A story following the life of German boy "Stefan". The book starts with the Stefan moving to live with his Auntie in Britain in 1947 following the death of both his parents during the war. From here it looks in detail at the family and the events that lead up to the move, taking the reader back to the 1920's and following up till the early 1940's. Although not the longest of books at 356 pages this isn't the sort of book you can breeze through, It quite rightly requires your full attention. The Writing style is almost orchestral with each part and character having a contributing role in the piece. Like a musical prelude the title Character of the book appears in the first, and then again in the last chapter finale, with the main symphony of the book following his family story in great detail. The Musical metaphor is never more appropriate than in the wonderful lyrical flavour of the text and its this clever use of language and imagery that breaths life into the characters and scenes.

Overall I really enjoyed the book though it turned it to be quite a different read than I had first expected. A rewarding read though possibly not one for the beach.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ethereal quality as the characters drift in and out of the story, 2 July 2011
By 
Janie U (Kings Cliffe, England) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The German Boy (Paperback)
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The timeline of the book is quite unusual, starting in 1947 then going back to 1927 to begin the story again.
Description fills the book with some very evocative smells, sensations and pictures. The pace is fairly slow and, at times, it is quite heavy going to read but the author manages to use the dreamy qualities of her descriptions to show the horrors of real life in an oddly bearable way.
At times the plot became confusing as there were many characters and their relationships switched about. When I took some time to think about the way the plot was developing, I realised that the changing loyalties was very realistic and I was hooked.
This book has the feel of a Douglas Kennedy except that this is much better. I am surprised that this author has not written more novels as the style is very accomplished.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Captivating, melancholy,absorbing read, 14 Jan. 2013
This review is from: The German Boy (Paperback)
I read this after reading The River by the same author, which slightly disappointed me. This novel draws you in from the start and the characters are extremely well drawn. I agree with other reviewers who say this is not a light read but I could not help but be entranced by the lives of these people and how the choices they make reverberate.
I was desperate for some resolution to take place to ensure a happy ending but of course that would be too predictable.
The descriptive writing is beautiful and the story will stay with you long after reading.
Highly recommended and plenty to discuss as a book club choice.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unexpectedly interesting, 8 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: The German Boy (Paperback)
I read this book for my book club, and from the title and synopsis did not expect to enjoy it that much. However, once I got into the story, and got used to the style of writing, I found myself engrossed, particularly as I empathesised with the three main female characters. I was not completely sure until the end why it was called The German Boy as he only appeared briefly at the beginning, but finally it all made sense. I shall go on to read other books by this author.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very good book, 15 Nov. 2012
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This review is from: The German Boy (Kindle Edition)
I love the stlye of writing, the story is very original and well written

The style is very descriptive and creates good atmosphere

I am two thirds through the book and everything is falling into place

The story has become very tense and i am enjoying it very much

I would certainly recommend this book to my friends

Well Done
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good read., 8 Dec. 2012
By 
Flappit Witch (Yorkshire, where else?) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The German Boy (Kindle Edition)
I wouldn't put this up with the "Best Sellers" as the advertising claims, but it is worth a read. Different, yet in some parts predictable. A really good look at relationships during and after the war. Sad outcome
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant!, 19 Jun. 2013
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This review is from: The German Boy (Paperback)
Intricately woven tale that kept me reading. At the beginning I found it hard to keep all of the characters in my head in the correct chronological order but i persevered and really enjoyed it.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant author, 11 Nov. 2012
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This review is from: The German Boy (Kindle Edition)
I am lucky enough to be taught by the author, Tricia, at Bath Spa University. This is for the MA Creative Writing in the beautiful Corsham Court where the peacocks wander ! Beautifully written.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A German Boy., 16 May 2011
By 
Petra just a girl who loves to read... "book ... (Northern Ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The German Boy (Paperback)
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The German Boy is an interesting book, which the author Patricia Wastvedt clearly researched her history facts well. The book covers the years 1927 - 1947 and brings in the main historical facts that happened around that period of history.
To be truthful by reading the title and brief description of the book I thought I was going to learn more about Stefan a member of Hitler's youth who was trained to kill the British. Now due to his mother's death whose death was caused by the hand of the Nazis who he believed and loved so much. Stefen has to go to live with his British Aunt Elisabeth to learn to live among the people who he personally blamed for all that went wrong in his young life. Personally, I would have liked to know how he dealt with living among those that he swore to kill in the name of Hitler. Unfortunately I never got those answers only briefly at the end, therefore in my opinion I felt the book had the wrong title.
It was basically a story of love between two people namely Elisabeth and Michael Roth who first meet each other in 1927. Michael is one of the main characters of the book and we do learn a lot about him. He was born to a son of a Jewish Grandfather Lemuel Jacob Roth and a Gentile mother Lydia. When they married they then decided they were not going to follow any faith or worship any God. They had a son who they named Albert, Lemuel and Lydia were so shocked because of the way they reared Albert with no religion, Albert decided to follow his Jewish heritage. When he married Vera May, they named their children with strong Jewish names Michael Jacob Roth and Rachel Hannah Roth. Both children were very much loved and everything was perfect until the First World War happened and Albert was injured badly and also breathed in a lot of Mustard gas. This affected him internally and he was also disfigured, he was unable to do anything for himself and totally depended on his Mother and his wife for everything. Alberts mother and Vera May, his wife nursed Albert until his death. This is the one time the years before 1927 were mentioned in the book, explaining Michael's history and his Jewish blood which is important when the author was writing about Michael's time in France and Germany later on in the book.
Michael was a fantastic artist and when he first seen Elisabeth he immediately fell in love with her.
Karen Elisabeth's sister, (Stefan's Mother) met and married a German who turned out to be a horrible Nazi, and her story was an interesting one it was mainly because of her, Elisabeth and Michael were kept apart and Elisabeth was the one who always seemed to be clearing up Karen's mistakes.
Elisabeth always seemed to act a martyr and went through life feeling sorry for herself. I felt it was hard to like Elisabeth as she never took responsibility for her own actions and as she clearly said she choose not to be happy in life she choose to be content with life and if things were going her way that was fine. She clearly loved Michael but married George. At the time she met George she had lost her job and as her mother said she had no room so she needed a home so George was the answer to that problem so she married him clearly there was no love on her side of the relationship. When Michael appears again later in the book she decides she is going to leave with Michael but once again Karen is in the way therefore that does not work out once again. Elisabeth clearly was a selfish person, though when I read more about her mother I felt the author used that relationship well to explain why Elisabeth was the way she was. Elisabeth's relationship with her mother was a hard one and just explained why Elisabeth got through life the way she did.
Karen was clearly very spoiled growing up especially by Elisabeth and I believe that was why she liked to keep Elisabeth away from Michael. Karen was unable to cope with Elisabeth loving anyone more than Elisabeth loved Karen.
Karen made a lot of mistakes throughout the book but the author had her paying for them dearly not just by her death but by the way she lived before her death and how she was treated even by the servants.
We also meet Michael's sister Rachel and are told her story throughout the book, she turned into a very bitter woman because of her not having children.
I would recommend this book but not a book for relaxing with, this is a book which is clearly for those times the reader wants to get into a serious subject and not for those looking a for bit of fun and relaxation.
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2 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not for me!, 7 Jun. 2012
By 
J. Hopwood (Haslemere, Surrey) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The German Boy (Paperback)
I downloaded this on to my Kindle hoping it would be a good holiday read. I stuck with it to about a quarter of the way in when I gave up! The story leaps around too much for me, being written in years, and I felt that the characters didnt have enough 'meat' on them to hold my attention, perhaps if I had stayed with it they would have developed more, but I feel that 25% of the way in should be enough to get my attention - it wasnt!

Shame - I feel I have wasted my time and money here.
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The German Boy
The German Boy by Tricia Wastvedt (Paperback - 7 Jun. 2012)
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