Customer Reviews


2 Reviews
5 star:
 (1)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new perspective on the civilian experience of war
I found it hard to put this book down, such was the freshness of the anecdotes and the lack of sentimentality. We are all familiar with the cliches about the nation pulling together in war time. This book makes it clear quite a lot of people did not embrace the spirit of sacrifice and community, acting selfishly and treating evacuees badly. It also offers unheard stories...
Published 10 months ago by Mrs. R. C. Tinsley

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "There was this particular girl with impetigo that no one would take..."
What makes this set of memories of WWII especially poignant is that it is about children and their experience of war. It concentrates heavily on the experiences of British children, and after I had read a few excerpts I felt saddened by the stories of those who found evacuation terrifying, and the painful times their parents had. Some had lovely stories of being cherished...
Published 16 months ago by Eileen Shaw


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A new perspective on the civilian experience of war, 20 Sep 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Young Voices: British Children Remember the Second World War (Hardcover)
I found it hard to put this book down, such was the freshness of the anecdotes and the lack of sentimentality. We are all familiar with the cliches about the nation pulling together in war time. This book makes it clear quite a lot of people did not embrace the spirit of sacrifice and community, acting selfishly and treating evacuees badly. It also offers unheard stories about how the city of Hull suffered a huge amount of bombing for years, yet without much media interest at the time or since, probably because it was "Up North" and didn't have a cathedral destroyed (unlike Coverntry, where fewer people died). Really interesting.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "There was this particular girl with impetigo that no one would take...", 24 Mar 2013
By 
Eileen Shaw "Kokoschka's_cat" (Leeds, England) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Young Voices: British Children Remember the Second World War (Hardcover)
What makes this set of memories of WWII especially poignant is that it is about children and their experience of war. It concentrates heavily on the experiences of British children, and after I had read a few excerpts I felt saddened by the stories of those who found evacuation terrifying, and the painful times their parents had. Some had lovely stories of being cherished and welcomed, but the majority were ambivalent, even so.

It makes dispiriting reading but what I felt the lack of more than anything was a sense of narrative. I began to question why people had not been allowed to give their whole stories. Instead, these chopped-up pieces fragmented the experiences they gave us, making the book unwieldy and even more downbeat than they needed to be. Many of the excerpts were written by the same people, and to have their stories chopped-up according to what stage of the war they were talking about lessened the sense that these were people living through very different experiences according to what happened to them. The story of Carmin Sidonio, a boy of Italian origin, living in Glasgow ran throughout the war, but it felt as if I was being given glimpses of him, rather than a full-scale recounting of what happened to him. By the time I reached the part telling of the internment of one of his family, I was hard-pressed to remember earlier fragmernts of his story. Countess Mountbatten of Burma's story would have benefitted from being set in its own context, as would the story of Janet Atlee, eventually the wife of the leader of the Opposition. Not to mention the stories of youngsters like Peter Smith, Rodney Giesler, Eileen Woods, Peter Izard, Bess Cummings, who was shipwrecked when a torpedo hit The Benares, and the teenaged Pacifist Tony Parker, among many others. As it is you are just getting interested in them when they are cut off.

I can't, therefore, recommend this book as warmly as I would like to, but perhaps others won't mind the fragmentation as much as I did?
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Young Voices: British Children Remember the Second World War
Young Voices: British Children Remember the Second World War by Imperial War Museum (Hardcover - 27 Sep 2007)
Used & New from: 0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews