Customer Reviews


6 Reviews
5 star:
 (5)
4 star:    (0)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loamhedge: A Great Entry to the Series.
With "Loamhedge" Brian manages both to retain the quality and spirit of previous books in the series, while still pushing at the boundaries. In terms of plot it is a very difficult book to describe as there appears initially to be so many separate strands: Martha, a haremaid of Redwall abbey, has been unable to walk since she and her brother, Horty, were brought to the...
Published on 7 Jun 2004 by Tom B

versus
6 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Pales in comparison..."
"What secrets lie in the ancient ruins of Loamhedge?"
Brian Jacques is back with another delightful novel from the Redwall series, known to be one of the best set of good ole' yarns to still being read and enjoyed by numerous people.
Like some people, I’ve been waiting for quite awhile for Jacque's latest work, which was released late last year in America...
Published on 22 Feb 2004


Most Helpful First | Newest First

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loamhedge: A Great Entry to the Series., 7 Jun 2004
This review is from: Loamhedge (Tale of Redwall) (Hardcover)
With "Loamhedge" Brian manages both to retain the quality and spirit of previous books in the series, while still pushing at the boundaries. In terms of plot it is a very difficult book to describe as there appears initially to be so many separate strands: Martha, a haremaid of Redwall abbey, has been unable to walk since she and her brother, Horty, were brought to the haven of safety. Held in the grips of some past trauma she is overjoyed to be told in a vision by Martin the Warrior that she may be able to walk again. However, the cure, it appears, lies far to the south in the ruins of Loamhedge Abbey. Who will travel into such dangerous territory? Horty and his rebellious cohorts are certainly game but in truth are far too young and immature to undertake such a quest.
Enter Sarabando and Bragoon, two former runaway dibbuns now growing old but still very much full of life. After years of wandering Mossflower country and beyond, they have decided to visit the abbey were they were initially brought up.
Far to the east a badger, Lonna Bowstripe, is consumed by a lust for vengeance and swears an oath to kill the beasts that murdered his dear companion. However, as he pursues the villainous Raga Bol and his crew he draws ever nearer to a certain abbey.
Lastly a bumbling crew of vermin are heading for Redwall intent on taking the fabled "magic sword" for themselves. They are led by a most amusing fox, Little Redd... sorry Badredd.
Your first reaction to this might be that Brian has put his fingers in too many pies but I am very happy to be able to report that the plot holds together very well as almost every plot group overlap and interacts with every other while still giving a very slick read. Character development is on top form and the cast is as strong as it is varied. There is also more than your average amount of twisting and turning in the plot so that even aspects of the storyline that seem quite predictable on first glance manage to be resolved in pleasingly surprising ways.
However, what I most enjoyed about this new entry to the series is how it is, in some interesting ways, quite groundbreaking in the way distinct themes recur and resound so effectively around the various plots. Keep your eyes peeled especially for contrasts of isolation and friendship and of earnest recklessness and maturity with a childlike edge.
It was also very nice to see characters such as Saro, Bragoon, Horty and Martha confound one's expectation of Redwall heroes. Brian is known among his fans for often revisiting the idea of the young beast being guided by Martin's spirit towards his or her fate and that they will often prove themselves in the eyes of some group of elders. However, none of these characters can really be connected to any idea of the typical formula. Saro and Bragoon oscillate between being streetwise warriors, to dibbuns who have never grown up, to semi-parental figures for the rebellious "teenagers". Horty rather ends up learning far more about himself as opposed to "proving his quality" and what we see happen to him does not suggest an utter u-turn but rather an experience that has set him in the right direction for the future. And Martha, stuck in her wheelchair, grows in ways atypical of your standard Redwall heroine. Even Lonna, who on paper sounds like yet another badgerlord in search of revenge actually has quite a bit of novelty about him, for in him we get a far more gritty portrait than we are used to and begin to believe far more the warning about badgers filled with the bloodwrath.
"Loamhedge" also has a wonderful sense of topsy-turvy: old beasts act like dibbuns again, an abbot looses self-control while the youngest character shows the greatest restraint and the weakest vermin rises to the top of the pile. Brian's ability to create and sustain atmosphere is thankfully not diminished in what could have been a tale of confused mood, whereas what comes across is crystal clear in its feeling, and the description of landscape really adds a sense of the darkness to much of the plot.
The key complaint some have had is that we do not find out that much about Loamhedge Abbey itself and while that is true I was not greatly disappointed. For Brian to convincingly portray the final days of the abbey any more than he does would stray into territory so dark that the book would be on the verge of unpleasant to read and would loose the wonderfully varied air of delight and suspense that he creates here. As it is, the legend is kept alive admirably well and the atmosphere of the place is effectively sustained.
All in all, "Loamhedge" is an excellent addition to the series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars character's so real you feel like you could touch them, 18 Feb 2009
What can I say? I've just finished reading Brian Jacques's loamhedge and all i can say i that it's absolutely amazing! a sad and complex chapter the redwall saga that feels more like a grand work of high literature than just another redwall book. Jacques instantly taps into whatever mood he wants to create effortlessly. It's uproariously funny, beautifully mysterious, potently touching, thoughtfully dark and nailbitingly tense. This may sound like far too many emotions for one book but that just shows what a master Jacques really is. the book's real triumph is that more than in any other redwall book the characters are deep and believable, i found myself getting personally attached to them in a way the few books do. Especially Horty the headstrong teenage hare who's affection for his little sister and personal determination to prove himself to the world reminded me strongly of myself. I don't want to give anything away but by redwallen standard's the climax to loamhedge is quite sad, I genuinely felt Horty's pain as if it where my own, but inspite of that the book's end an uplifting one that would make even the worst cynic believe that that world is a good place where people can become wise and great.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the Very Best of the Series. A real Stunner!, 24 Nov 2003
By A Customer
Absolutely Brilliant. As a true Redwall fan i can honestly say this is one of my very favourites, the plot is really original with plenty of twists. it involves characters which have depth. Mr Jacques' fantastic style of writing means that we can identify with the characters in context. Set in a time after Triss, this book allows us to go back and explore Loamhedge, which has only evr been touched on in Mattimeo and Mossflower. It allows us to link back to the past of the story while time advances. For any real redwall fan, this is a must buy and a chance to once again get drawn back into the world of Redwall Abbey. They don't get much better than this one!
Jonathan Coley
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A ripping good read!, 9 Nov 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
As always a story with wonderfully engaging characters. Brian Jaques (RIP) has left a legacy that appeals to young and old alike. This story has numerous layers all of which will contribute to your immersion in the world of Redwall.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mr Jacques does it again.., 1 Aug 2004
By A Customer
Ok so they can all come across as a bit samey in plot (good vs evil, good wins, the end!) but it has to be said that it works and altogether the Redwall stories are fantastic time and time again. Can't be faulted.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars "Pales in comparison...", 22 Feb 2004
By A Customer
This review is from: Loamhedge (Tale of Redwall) (Hardcover)
"What secrets lie in the ancient ruins of Loamhedge?"
Brian Jacques is back with another delightful novel from the Redwall series, known to be one of the best set of good ole' yarns to still being read and enjoyed by numerous people.
Like some people, I’ve been waiting for quite awhile for Jacque's latest work, which was released late last year in America. So, how good is it?
Without ruining the intriguing plot, Jacques has woven a tale of adventure and suspense; no changes there. We journey with travellers on a quest, and a badger with a destiny and goal.
Unfortunately, that's pretty much all Loamhedge develops into. Loamhedge plays a significant part of the story, but it is only 'seen' in the later parts of the novel. The plot, based around the badger Lonna Bowstripe, is both exciting yet boring; there's nothing new that hasn't been seen before in Jacque's later novels. This is the key main issue; although the novel is indeed exciting, the plot seems dry, and almost overused and cliché to a certain point. Although there are several new ideas developed within the saga, such as teenage rebellion, the story in general lacks expansion. Redwall at one point is invaded, yet this storytelling pales in comparison to what was seen in the original Redwall novel.
The last, major problem is the desire to make the reader read; Brian Jacques has always had a talent with words, riddles and undertone plots, but unfortunately this is nonexistent. The novel, in my opinion, pales in comparison to the likes of Bellmaker, Long Patrol and even Lord Brocktree.
So, how good is Loamhedge? Make no doubt about it, it is indeed a good book, but it is definitely the weaker of the novels in the series. One saving grace, however, is my personal favourite line from this book.
"We've lived one summer too long."
Ironic, as this might be the case with the Redwall series.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Loamhedge (Tale of Redwall)
Loamhedge (Tale of Redwall) by Brian Jacques (Hardcover - 5 Feb 2004)
Used & New from: 0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews