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3.5 out of 5 stars138
3.5 out of 5 stars
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on 31 July 2014
Very hard work, and a bit silly. I couldn't understand what all the fuss was about. Slightly irreverent, but worth a Jihad against Salman Rushdie? I don't think so.
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on 26 August 2015
I started to read this thinking it was an analytical evaluation of a set of beliefs. I suspect I will have to read some other background books before I can hope to make any sense of it. To the western mind-set I think one is likely to wonder what all the fuss was about. In future I will stick to George Orwell. Being from a practical and technical background I perhaps don't have the necessary understanding for arty academic waffle.
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on 22 June 2015
Having read "A brief history of the Arabs" and other books on the origin of Islam has greatly increased my enjoyment of the Satanic verses. Otherwise, I would have struggled with it. The use of language is superb, imagination has been "let loose", its is very funny in parts and very "contemplative" in other parts. The characters are described in detail and "very real"! A very enjoyable read!
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on 6 September 2013
Whatever you think about the book, don't buy this particular product.
This doesn't seem to be the original text, but rather a printed-then-scanned version, complete with silly typos. "e" and "c" are mixed (e.g. "Queen of Shcba"), sometimes "rn" becomes "m" ("all four comers of the room"), missing letters and so forth.
It's worth reading, so get it from another source.
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on 24 April 2016
Nearly became the second book ever that i just couldn't finish because of boredom and just not being able to follow what on earth he was rambling on about throughout. The style is just weird, there's no real story and I really don't understand what all the fatwa fuss was about in the eighties. I'm sure he must have been on something writing this drivel. Good luck with it.
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Without wishing to become embroiled in the controversy surrounding this book, there is no doubting the quality of the writing. This book has a strong fantasy element (not goblins and dragons, but rather events that wouldn't normally occur in the 'real' world) and I have to admit I found the first 150 pages or so slightly confusing, but once I got used to Rushdies style, and the storyline, I found the rest of the book to be completely engaging. Rushdie uses very descriptive language and there are some beautiful phrases littered throughout this book which really highlight particular passages and make you stop to read them again. The story is original and quirky and I enjoyed reading a book i've heard so much about but have never read up until now. Although it is confusing at times, I'd say the beautiful and elegant prose more than compensates for this and perseverance is recommended. A good book that is worth a read at some point in your life.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
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on 22 March 2012
I grew up in India and very annoyingly this book was banned there. I think this is a perfectly normal book on satire, anyone who loves that genre will fully enjoy this. However I am not a big fan of satire and hence I got a little bored half way through the book, to me buying and reading this book was more about satisfying my curiosity.
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on 3 July 2014
This is a quite extraordinary book. Both brilliant and frustrating. I was given Midnights Children last Christmas and loved it. So I couldn't wait to read The Satanic Verses. I also felt that I wanted to read it on principle given the attempts to ban it and the threats to the life of the author. I did a bit of preparatory reading about the controversy before I started the book which I think helped my reading. Its much more difficult than Midnights Children and its not the sort of book that you can leave for a few days and then pick up again. At times it is bewildering but it has a compelling quality about it that keeps you reading. And at the end I realised that I had thoroughly enjoyed it. It is beautifully written but infuriating in its complex web of dreams and religious references. Overall I am glad I read it and I would recommend it if you like a challenging read. Should it have won the Booker?
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on 22 March 2016
This book got better as it progressed. I found that my lack of knowledge of the basics of the Islamic religious "stories" frustrated my reading slightly. Brought up with a Christian background, the characters in the Bible are well known to me so if a character was to crop up later in a story, I would have known what their role in the Bible had of been. Whereas in this story, I could see that certain character names came up later in a different time frames, but I found I had forgotten their characteristics. Some of the sentences are very (too) long with a long list of adjectives or adverbs.
I obviously knew that this book had caused offense to many when it was written and I could see why perhaps this was so.
I enjoyed the book, it had been one I had been meaning to read for a long time. It was long and quite tough going but worth reading.
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on 25 July 2008
Over the English Channel, a hi-jacked airliner explodes leaving two survivors clinging to each other as they fall. One gains a halo while the other grows horns and goat legs, acting out the ancient battle between good and evil again; but which is which?

This is a very complex book, with many interwoven themes: love, belonging and betrayal being the central ones. Different people will get many different things out of it, but what struck a chord with me was the issues of belonging, and the difficulties of standing between cultures, since this is something I feel on a day-to-day basis.

I also loved the language of the book. Rushdie has a wonderful gift for words and it was a pleasure to let the words drift over you. It also captured, for me, the voice of Indian literature. It does sound like an authentic mix of cosmopolitan English and Hindi; while Rushdie wasn't the first Indian writer to write in English and add a twist of Indian colloquialism, he has certainly mastered the art. Like its predecessor, Midnight's Children, I can't recommend this book enough.
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