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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not your average meal out
I can now confirm that whatever version of The Hitchhiker's Guide that appears in my head it's not the books. I think I've deluded myself that after a 16 plus years gap that I'd actually read them rather than had a mangled version of half listened too radio plays and TV series with a little new film mixed in. So after getting over that I found The Restaurant at the End of...
Published on 25 Oct. 2009 by Amazon Customer

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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An entertaining sequel although without many new ideas
This is the second in the series of the Hitchhiker guides written by Douglas Adams with the continued adventures of Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, Zaphod Beeblebrox (including both his heads) and Trillian.
The book starts where the Hitchhiker’s Guide finishes, with Zaphod asking Arthur whether he’s hungry, suggesting they go to the restaurant at the end of...
Published on 10 Dec. 2003 by Darren Simons


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Not your average meal out, 25 Oct. 2009
By 
Amazon Customer "Gav" (Cardiff, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I can now confirm that whatever version of The Hitchhiker's Guide that appears in my head it's not the books. I think I've deluded myself that after a 16 plus years gap that I'd actually read them rather than had a mangled version of half listened too radio plays and TV series with a little new film mixed in. So after getting over that I found The Restaurant at the End of the Universe quite familiar but also very refreshing.

Beyond the two key moments of the book, one that involves the Restaurant at the End of the Universe, there is a weaving of something bigger that involves Zaphod and his brains, which might hopefully explains why he stole the spaceship Heart of Gold in the first place.

As I'm book two and still on familiar territory I'm getting the feeling that for Adams plot wasn't the important factor, as you could boil it down those two main set pieces, but more the language and the playing with humanity and our view of ourselves.

The humour and there are lot of funny moments at times comes from how stupid we are. We being everyone in galaxy it seems. Though saying that we're not important and you realise that when you read The Guide's entry on The Universe - some information to help you live in it. Boiling down to it's vast so vast in fact that anything in it so small that it's not worth mentioning. So nothing anyone does is very important.

But what they do is fascinating especially the way that Adams writes it. Not only has he given us a great cast in Arthur, Trillian, Ford, Zaphod and Marvin he's placed them in some in some bizarre and mind altering situations and seeing how they cope. And Arthur's request for a cup of Tea at the beginning is so not the answer to anything.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Even better than a Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster, 14 Dec. 2002
By 
Daniel Jolley "darkgenius" (Shelby, North Carolina USA) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker's Trilogy) (School & Library Binding)
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe begins where The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy left off, only Zaphod Beeblebrox's idea of stopping for dinner at the aforementioned restaurant is delayed a bit (or an incredibly long bit, depending on your upcoming temporal location). Having escaped the legendary planet Magrathea without having been killed by intergalactic policemen or, in the case of Arthur Dent, having his brain slicked up and studied for the inherent Question of the Life, the Universe, and Everything which is undoubtedly hardwired into it somewhere, the hoopiest cast of space travelers in the galaxy thought their troubles were over, or at least greatly lessened. They were completely wrong. The Vogon ship that destroyed the earth shows up to destroy the last two remnants of that now-dead world, namely Arthur Dent and Trillian McMillian. Unfortunately, Arthur's increasingly strident demands for a cup of real tea have the entire computer system on board the Heart of Gold focused on that task rather than anything as silly as escaping imminent destruction. This is just the beginning of this particular set of adventures. Other highlights include a visit by Zaphod's dead great-grandfather, a night of drinks and food at the Restaurant at the End of the Universe, Zaphod's experience inside the universally-feared Total Perspective Vortex, a trip in the mega-rock band Danger Area's stunt ship into a sun, a meeting with the real Ruler of the Universe, and a return trip to the Earth-sort of.
Nobody crams as much comedy per page as Douglas Adams. While The Restaurant at the End of the Universe isn't quite as amazing as its predecessor, this is only because its predecessor was so amazingly original and different from everything that came before it. The satire Adams employs, often quite subtle, is as brilliant as always; anyone who reads this book will laugh, but only some will realize that he/she is really laughing at himself and the absurdity of human life that Adams is playing off of. These characters are more real to me than many of the people I know in real life. Best of all, they don't change: Arthur Dent remains the rather bemused, clueless soul he has always been; Ford Prefect is just Ford, only more so; Zaphod-well, Zaphod's just this guy, you know; and poor longsuffering Marvin the Paranoid Android is still the most depressing (yet hilarious) robotically engineered life form in the galaxy. If these crazy characters and Adams' brilliantly comedic narrative don't make you laugh, you would be well advised to don a pair of Joo Janta 200 Super-Chromatic Peril Sensitive Sunglasses because you are headed smack dab into big trouble indeed.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another very funny and warped look at the universe., 29 Jan. 2005
By 
Ian Tapley "thefragrantwookiee" - See all my reviews
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THE STORY:
Having escaped Earth shortly before it's destruction, Arthur Dent finds himself travelling in the company of the work-dodging journalist Ford Prefect, the insane adventurer Zaphon Beeblebrox, Tricia Macmillan (aka Trillian) a girl he met at a party and the morbidly depressed robot Marvin. Together they pull up a seat in the establishment of the title and prepare to watch the destruction of the universe.
WHAT'S GOOD:
More of the same from Adams, with wonderfully twisted logic combines with the insightfully witty entries in the Guide to provide alot of clever ideas and more clever humour. As always, Arthur's slightly bemused take on the events of his life add a tone to the story that rings amusingly true for a fellow Englishman. By now we all know that the answer to the Ultimate Question About Life, The Universe And Everything is 42. In this book (in another wonderful twist of logic) we discover that though the answer is correct, the question itself is wrong. Best of all is when Arthur and Ford find themselves on a spaceship full of insufferable middlemen, beauraucrats and hair dressers, who turn out to be the founders of the human race.
WHAT'S BAD:
I found that Adams' disposal of the supporting cast was a bit casual and poorly explained. Also, the description of the Restaurant is pretty nausating (but that's probably intentional).
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5.0 out of 5 stars An epic creation that takes science-fiction to a whole new level and which is destined to become a classic, 10 May 2013
For anyone interested in science-fiction, Douglas Adams `Hitch-hiker's guide to the galaxy' is indispensable reading, as too are those books within the series that follow. He is an author who defines sci-fi, with a uniquely identifiable style and out-of-this world concepts that continue to dazzle and amaze. This is the book that everyone is talking about across galaxies. This is the stuff of which space-adventurer's dream about. This is a book that transformed my enjoyment of science-fiction into an irrevocable passion for all-time.

`The restaurant at the end of the universe is the sequel to the highly acclaimed `hitch-hiker's guide to the galaxy' and is a supremely singular read.

"Good evening ladies and gentlemen, I am your host for tonight, Max Quordlepleen, and I have just come straight from the other end of time where I have been hosting a show at the Big Bang Burger Bar and I will be your host for this historic occasion ~ the end of history itself."

If you've done six impossible things this morning why not round it off with breakfast, lunch or dinner at Milliway's, the Restaurant at the end of the universe...

I don't want to give too much of the storyline away, as it is only a very short 187 pages. Akin to Terry Pratchett and other striking, distinctive authors, Douglas Adams is the kind of writer who cannot be described but whose work should be read and discovered. Full of outlandish, bizarre-ness and peculiarity this is a tale full of dry humor and wit that (as with `Marmite') you will either love or hate.
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5.0 out of 5 stars "I am so hip I have difficulty seeing over my pelvis", 23 Mar. 2013
By 
S. Shamma "Suad" (Abu Dhabi, UAE) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
What a fantastic follow-up to the first installment in the series. Douglas Adams really knows how to keep his audience entertained with his brilliant wit and sense of humour.

Now that I've read the second part of the series, I feel more involved in the story and the characters. I understand the humour better, I understand the journey better, and you start to get a clearer grasp on what is happening and why (which barely made any sense at all in the first part). Zaphod started to make more sense to me, in the way he acts, we start to learn more about how his brain functions and we get a little closer to finding out why he stole the Heart of Gold and become more intrigued as to why his brain is blocking all this information.

Now that we've discovered that this thing we call Earth was nothing more than a gigantic computer powered and controlled by mice to find the question to life, the universe and everything after we have already understood the answer to be 42, and now that we know that it has been destroyed by the Vogons to make way for a bypass before that question can be discovered, we now wait for protagonist Arthur Dent (one of only 2 survivors of Earth) to find out what this ultimate question is.

In this book we carry on where we left off in the first part, they want to stop and eat somewhere. The Vogons however have a different idea, as they still want to destroy the two remaining survivors of Earth (Arthur and Trillian) as well as Zaphod, the President of the Universe, who stole the ship Heart of Gold. And this must have been one of my favourite parts, as the Vogons begin attacking their ship, Arthur (a true Englishman) has had enough of the awful tea he's been drinking on board the Heart of Gold and as a result gets the entire computer system caught up on the task of creating the best tea he's ever had instead of fighting back against the attack or escaping their fast-approaching end. And just like that, the adventures begin.

We meet Zaphod's dead great-grandfather, the actual ruler of the Universe, visit the Restaurant at the End of the Universe and find out who the founders of the human race actually were/are. Arthur and Ford are stranded on a ship filled with the most annoying, intolerable people (who consist of officials, hairdressers, lawyers, so on), and land on a planet that they can't seem to get off. This is where things get really interesting, and before it gets really really good, the book ends and we are forced to immediately start reading the third installment to find out what happens next...

Adams' satire and humour is absolutely fantastic as he uses language and play on words to reflect our bizarre behaviour. You learn to laugh at yourself as he mocks the human race, and you begin to relate to the events of this book more than you think.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A burst of comedic genius, 14 Jan. 2011
By 
Frank Bierbrauer (Manchester, Lancashire, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Well haven't I said enough about the first one ? No, nope definitely not. The first time ever I have commented on a trilogy and talked about the sequel to the first one, its worth it.

The travels continue with Arthur Dent, Ford Prefect, Zaphod Beeblebrox, Trillian and Marvin ending up at the "Restaraunt at the End of the Universe", literally that, a restaraunt where people from all over creation can observe the destruction of the entire Universe in comfort and dine throughout while listening to the compere Max Quardlepleen who makes jokes in bad taste and basically just has some fun, the meal itself being amazingly expensive because the restaraunt is held in a time bubble, investing a single penny in the distant past in a bank account will of course pay for it after extremely long term interest is calculated. There are of course many strange people here too such as followers of the second coming of the great prophet Zarquon who is amazingly late but who through some sort of miracle appears in the last few seconds only to vanish in a puff of smoke, some people from Sirius B the dog star making appropriate barking noises and others who feel quite depressed after Max notes : "And there we see the Solar system of Gastromil boiling away into the ultra violet, its too late to worry about whether you've left the gas on now".

This is the best of the series no doubt about it, the burst of genius started in the first book blooms in this one. Just a taste of what can be found in this superb comedy.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Not perfect, but more than good enough to enjoy :), 27 Dec. 2005
This book should be read after the "The hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", due to the fact that “The Restaurant at the End of the Universe” starts where the previously mentioned book ends. That is, with the two survivors to the Earth´s destruction, Arthur Dent and Ford Prefect, traveling along Trillian, Marvin the robot and Zaphod Beeblebrox in the “Heart of gold”, a stolen Improbability Drive ship.
If you read this book, you will go along with our friends in their adventures, for example when they visit Milliways, the Restaurant at the End of the Universe, or when they escape certain destruction in a stuntship used by rockstars. You will also learn the real meaning of “dying for a cup of tea”, and have a chance to eat meat that wants to be eaten. Of course, Marvin will continue giving you lessons in pessimism, and Zaphod will go on being “so weird that he should be in movies”.
I liked this book, but I didn´t love it nearly as much as "The hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy". What is more, “The Restaurant at the End of the Universe” doesn´t have a clear ending, and I find some fault in that. Of course, I am more than ready to read the next book in the series, but that is not the point.
On the whole, I don´t recommend “The Restaurant at the End of the Universe” to those that haven´t read "The hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy", due to the fact that they won´t enjoy it so much. Notwithstanding that, I do recommend this book as entertaining reading material for those already addicted to Douglas Adams quirky sense of humour. It is not perfect, but it is more than good enough to enjoy :)
Belen Alcat
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4.0 out of 5 stars A series of short stories stuck together, 26 Sept. 2009
By 
Jim J-R (West Sussex, UK) - See all my reviews
The second book in the series continues in a similar vein to the first, although the flippant sense of surrealism seems more forced. The book is very much divided into a series of acts - possibly as a result of being based on the radio series which was presented as a set of discrete episodes. A lot of what happens in this book I remembered as being later in the series, which is quite exciting in a way as it means there's lots still to come that I've forgotten!

It's nice that some of the minor characters get bigger roles in this one - the plot moving away from a focus on Arthur and in fact on the most part it seems onto Zaphod and his investigations into who runs the universe. Trillian still gets a very poor showing however and the book probably suffers from a lack of female character action.

I find that Adams' writing seems to have slipped into a pattern of peril, escape, peril, escape etc. and the presence of the Infinite Improbability Drive acts a bit of a deus ex machina providing escape from peril that can be anti-climatic and has a lazy feel to it.

This book has not only some very funny ideas, but ideas which when thought about pose some very interesting questions that still have relevance on this planet... for example food which wants to be eaten, and shipping off a useless third of the population.

Overall, another good quick read that deserves going over several times to catch everything missed at first - but not quite as fantastic as the original.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy � Part 2, 23 May 2005
By 
Jane Aland (England) - See all my reviews
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While later additions to the series can be read on a take them or leave them basis, it's really rather pointless to separate The Hitchhikers Guide To The Galaxy from The Restaurant At The End of the Universe, as the two books seem to form the two halves of one longer story. As such this sequel finally wraps up all the mysterious clues left about Zaphod Beeblebrox's past brain surgery and his reason for stealing the Heart of Gold in the first place, and we finally get the Ultimate Question of Life, The Universe, and Everything - or at least as close as we are going to get thanks to a brilliant twist ending that sees the whole history of life on Earth upset 2 million years in the past. The Hitchhikers Guide itself start to play a larger role than just a framing device thanks to the novel starting with a trip to their publishing offices, and it's interesting to note just how much of this novel is dominated by Zaphod Beeblebrox - it's only really in the last third of the novel after they are all separated that Arthur Dent steps out of the shadows. In effect 3 excellent concepts crammed together - Zaphod's quest for the ruler of the universe, the Restaurant at the End of the Universe itself, and the Golgafringan ark - this novel lives up to the brilliance of Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy and satisfyingly wraps up the tale. The later novels are fun, but to all intents and purposes this book completes the tale.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Do you have a reservation, Sir?, 22 Dec. 2003
It was always going to be difficult to write a sequel to the phenomenally successful Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy, but do you know, I think Mr Adams just about pulls it off. If the reviews on this page are anything to go by, opinion is greatly varied on the matter, but I believe all the warmth, wit and sci-fi jargon from its predecessor spills over into the Restaurant at the End of the Universe.
We begin the story where the Hitchhikers Guide left off, with the Arthur and his strange new friends hurtling through space on the stolen ship, the Heart of Gold. No sooner has the book begun however, a familiar set of poetry-loving aliens reappear - the dreaded (yet hugely entertaining) Vogons. The circumstances surrounding their attack on the Heart of Gold ship is tremendously amusing in itself as all computer intelligence aboard Arthur's spacecraft is currently preoccupied with the character's request for a decent cup of tea. It takes a while, but a cup of the finest China hot drink finally appears. As the title suggests, the set of characters eventually find their way to the curious restaurant Milliways, situated - rather obviously - at the end of the Universe. Within this particular section of the story, I greatly enjoyed the wealth of description regarding the interior of the eatery. Douglas Adams takes the opportunity to let his imagination run wild, and the reader is allowed to learn of the "five tons of glitter alone" that "covered every available surface... The other surfaces were encrusted with jewels, precious seashells from Santraginus, gold leaf, mosaic tiles, lizard skins and a million unidentifiable embellishments and decorations. Arthur glanced round, half expecting to see someone making an American Express commercial."
Needless to say, Adams continues his much loved writing style and goes on to introduce a batch of brilliantly comical characters, including intergalactic rock star Hotblack Desiato, (who is spending a year dead for tax reasons) and the dim-witted Captain of an unusual aircraft, who has spent the last three years conducting meetings with his crew from the comfort of his bath. One character I missed from the first book however, was the amusingly annoying (if that's at all possible) Eddie, the ship's computer. That is not to say that he doesn't appear, but only briefly. Marvin the paranoid android is depressed as usual, and kept me entertained in his loathing of everything. I felt that the ending was rather lacking though, as some of the characters seem to just disappear and we do not get to find out what becomes of them (not until the follow up novel, 'Life, the Universe and Everything' that is).
There are plenty of unforgettably sharp lines: "Trin Tragula - for that was his name - was a dreamer, a thinker, a speculative philosopher or, as his wife would have it, an idiot." The section involving the hunt for the man who rules the Universe (an idiot who lives in a shack in the middle of nowhere) is especially enjoyable, as is the usual banter between the chief characters, who are on top form. Overall, I would have no hesitation on recommending the Restaurant at the End of the Universe, but do be sure to read the Hitchhikers Guide first. This truly is the stuff that cults are made of.
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The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker's Trilogy)
The Restaurant at the End of the Universe (Hitchhiker's Trilogy) by Douglas Adams (School & Library Binding - Mar. 2001)
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