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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book. Dunno why people had problems with it
What's wrong with you people this book (and the miniseries on TV) was great! SK (Stephen King) explained why the ending was the way it was (read the book or see the movie and you'll understand). SK said that people are usually told in movies and books that if you do the right thing everything will be OK. Good ALWAYS prevails when doing the right thing....and on and...
Published on 28 Feb 1999

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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting; but it doesnt quite work!
I am a great admirer of Mr King, and have read most of his works; but this,although interesting, does not quite 'work' in the way that his other novels of horror do, and for quite a simple reason.
King's great strength is his detailed observation and portrayal of ordinary people. Decent, everyday folk with their loves and hates, joys and worries, the sort of people...
Published on 6 Feb 2001


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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great book. Dunno why people had problems with it, 28 Feb 1999
By A Customer
What's wrong with you people this book (and the miniseries on TV) was great! SK (Stephen King) explained why the ending was the way it was (read the book or see the movie and you'll understand). SK said that people are usually told in movies and books that if you do the right thing everything will be OK. Good ALWAYS prevails when doing the right thing....and on and on. But what would happen if doing the right thing didn't always make it OK? What if you had to give one to save the rest and have to lose someone close to you? SK wanted to show people that he didn't believe that in real life good isn't always the triumphant one. That's what makes it realistic and realism is what makes it scary. I don't know what's wrong with this book being a screenplay. It's the same damn thing. And I just loved Linoge repeating "Born in Sin,Come on In."
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You will think hard after this one..it won't leave you., 27 Feb 1999
By A Customer
What happens when a tremendous storm, and a malevolent force converge over a small island full of people with dark secrets? You get the "Storm of the Century" by Stephen King. Once again, King relies on the readers own thoughts and sets up an incredible ending, which is guaranteed to make you think long and hard, a long time after you read it. This is the number 1 reason why I love this "book". Andre Linoge has come to Little Tall Island...and he knows everything about everyone. He brings out the worst in them all, but only has one request..."Give me what I want, and I'll go away." I can't tell you what he wants, but I can tell you that you will definately want more!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Having read the screenplay, I can't wait to see the film, 30 Nov 1999
By A Customer
Stephen King writes the screenplay to Storm of the Century in the same way he writes all his novels; he hooks you in and makes you feel like you are looking directly at what he is describing. Then, effectively, the shit hits the fan. The sinister Linoge is clearly an apparition of Randall Flagg, which regular readers will recognise from both The Stand, and several others King has written. Storm of the Century manages to horrify the reader, engross him or her and touch them. I must admit to feeling sad at the inevitability of the ending as Linoge chooses his successor. As King describes Mike's torment, you can clearly see it etched in his face, and as a result, hate the rest of the townsfolk for the way they treat him - although in their own way, they had no choice. Some people think that King's work is lame and doesn't really scare you, but that is not the only aspect of his work. The raw emotion you can feel from the characters, and the tension of the scene is written in a way that NOBODY can imitate. In short, I can't wait to see this film, and demand to know somehow when it is going to be released in the UK. King is not only the master of horror, but he is also a master storyteller. As he himself says: It is the tale; not he who tells it.
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31 of 35 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting; but it doesnt quite work!, 6 Feb 2001
By A Customer
I am a great admirer of Mr King, and have read most of his works; but this,although interesting, does not quite 'work' in the way that his other novels of horror do, and for quite a simple reason.
King's great strength is his detailed observation and portrayal of ordinary people. Decent, everyday folk with their loves and hates, joys and worries, the sort of people that live next door without any problems...until King comes along and drops them bodily into some bizarre and terrifying situation and then, in effect, invites us to watch their struggles to extricate themselves. In his novels you can see through the eyes of his characters; you can hear their innermost thoughts, feel their deepest emotions, understand their lives and problems. But I repeat, that is in his novels; written in his fluent and highly descriptive and colloquial prose.
But "Storm of the Century" is not a novel. It is the screenplay of the TV film, and like the film itself, can only show you the exterior of the characters. You can see their actions, hear their words, but you are not privy to their hidden thoughts and fears directly; you can only infer them from what you observe. And that is where this story comes to grief; it is strangely, not frightening at all to the reader, although Kings evident intention is to horrify you with his story of the evil and unhuman stranger that comes to the isolated island community and offers them a terrifying choice.
This stranger, Linoge, is not,(as I have seen suggested) an alter ego of Flagg in Kings "The Stand". Flagg is (to me) the embodument of pure chaos and destruction; his is a kind of mindless, giggling terror, impersonal, pointless and overpowering. Linoge, on the other hand, evinces a dark and malevolent intelligence, aimed murderously at each individual, in retribution for his or her particular personal sins. Linoge is a kind of nemesis. ( As an aside, it is perhaps pity that the actor Colm Feore gave the character such a spooky attraction in the film...or maybe thats just my feeling, given that I admire Mr Feore!) But ultimately, the stark choice offered by Linoge to the storm-bound islanders just isn't as terrible as King would have us think. (I wont spoil the story by giving full details) For even given the natural love and protective impulse of parents, there is really only one rational decision they can make, given the overwhelming promise of anihilation offered by Linoge as alternative to "giving him what he wants...." But the concept is interesting. I only wish King had told us more about the nature of the creature Linoge, and his"work".
It's worth reading, if you enjoy screenplays. King does include many asides and descriptions that a pure script would not need, aimed at the general reader. But the overall effect is not as moving or frightening as much of his other writing.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Entertaining King piece, 15 Feb 1999
By A Customer
In the winter of 1989, a nasty storm swept through the Northeast. Its destructive path left many pundits to claim that was THE STORM OF THE CENTURY. To the residents of Maine's Little Tall Island, the storm was extremely powerful, but paled next to the evil essence that accompanied the nasty weather.
Andre Limoge seems very human when he first arrives on the island. However, anyone who sees his fangs and theunnatural red shine of his eyes knows otherwise. Temporarily cut off from the mainland by the storm, the islanders gradually realize they are dealing with a malevolent being who gleefully uses his supernatural powers to cause havoc. Limoge vows to leave the island once he obtains what he wants. However, if they fail to give in To his "request", he threatens to destroy every living person on the island. His desire leaves the people horrified that they must honor his Faustian bargain if they are to survive his visit. Only one person of the two-hundred residents says no and this individual stands to lose more than just his life.
STORM OF THE CENTURY is Stephen King's screenplay of his made for TV movie and is quite entertaining and well written in of itself. The book provides the stage directions, the physical descriptions of the storm, the island, and its residents, and the frightening plot. Additionally, the screenplay provides readers with an insider's glimpse at how an idea can be transferred from the written page to the TV screen. Mr. King shows his versatility with this fun read.

Harriet Klausner
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4.0 out of 5 stars WOW...That's all I can say, 21 Feb 1999
By A Customer
OK, maybe I can say a little more. All I know is that I couldn't watch the miniseries for two reasons. I read the screenplay first and 1) I knew there was no way I could put myself through that kind of emotional wringer again, and 2) every time I read a truly great script, the end product is inevitably a disappointment. The screenplay for "Storm of the Century" kept me up all night, turning the pages, all the way to the horrific finale, and the very next day it was all I wanted to talk about (which was hard, since no one else had read or seen it). There were some slow moments that I'm sure could have been cut, but then it only would have been a five hour miniseries, since most of it was needed for the slowly building sense of dread and suspense. And that ending was incredibly depressing (though it could not have been more obvious which one he was going to get from the very start). My only complaint is that, when all was explained, the premise made no sense whatsoever. If Linogue had no problem killing people left and right, why did he bother putting the town through all of this? Why not just TAKE what he wanted? Considering the end, if I were one of the townsfolk, I would have rather lived with the uncertainty than all the heartache Linogue's actions caused. King offered plenty of goosebumps. Too bad there wasn't something more substantial at the story's core.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars King's new horrors grab your attention and don't let go!, 3 July 1999
By A Customer
I have never been a fan of King's literature or horror at all for that matter. But when I was exposed to the fierce imagination of this renowned author, I had no choice but to stare in awe at the brilliantly composed work called Storm of the Century. It leaves readers asking themselves, "Can I read any further? Can I withstand the suspense and thrill?" I can't hear the song "I'm a Little Teapot" without a shudder and the memory of suspenseful scenes rushing into my head. Excellent.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Stephen King's best ever, 28 April 1999
By A Customer
Stephen King's Storm of the Century was one of the few books which I have enjoyed reading in my life. I saw the movie and thought it was incredible, and reading the book was even better. The one thing about the story is that it does leave many questions unanswered. The setting is in Little Tall Island, Maine where a storm has cut off the island from the rest of civilization. A man named Andre Linoge appears in their town and insists, "If you give me what I want, I'll go away." Linoge asks for one of their children and ends up taking Mike Anderson's son to become his heir and teach him all that he knows. This is a must read if you a Stephen King fan in general.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Modern Convention Blows Out the Window, 19 Feb 1999
By A Customer
Well, after seeing the movie and reading the book I can honestly say that it is one of the most interesting plots in King's library of creativity. He loves to show the dark side of things, and when he does, he does it most effectively. I think the reason a lot of people dislike the story is because it IS disturbing and unsatisfying in the end. But that's just it-- it is supposed to be. King mixes a nice blend of story elements from his most recent works of Bag of Bones (let's rearrange some letters) to Needful Things (them townsfolk is something else...) to The Stand (a small group of people against one evil, evil man) all the way back to Cujo (is it me, or did the wolf's head actually turn into a Saint Bernard when the kids were petting it). And as far as the ending goes-- I say King is the master at making us squeal with terror and horror when we learn that we aren't getting what we want (as an audience). I know that I stayed drawn up in a tight knot for about an hour after finishing it. Way to Go Stephen King for delivering something worth viewing on television that might just make us think.
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5.0 out of 5 stars It is soooooooooo scary, 19 Feb 1999
By A Customer
The story takes place in a remote island called Little Tall off the coast of Maine. The main character is Mike Anderson the constable It is temporarily cutoff from the mainland because the storm of the century is going on. Then, an unwanted visitor arrives called Andre Lingone, he kills an old woman. The constable arrests him, but soon he finds that he is not human, because his eyes turn to blackness he has the power to make people's guilt felt to make them do crazy things, and he has fangs. Lingone escapes, kills a couple more people, all with the same murder message: Give me what I want and I'll go away. Then, he asks the town people to join him at a town meeting so he can tell them what he wants.
I loved the book and the movie, because it is so realistic and you feel like it could happen to you. I ask you to buy this book because it is great for people who like scary reads. The one thing that really scares you is the things about Roanoke Island. At the end the town ends up keeping yet another secret. But after all island folks can keep a secret you know.
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Storm of the Century: The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935
Storm of the Century: The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 by Stephen King (School & Library Binding - Oct 1999)
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