Customer Reviews


50 Reviews
5 star:
 (37)
4 star:
 (9)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:
 (3)
1 star:    (0)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good if you want to learn CSS, but drags on a bit.
My previous experience: I knew what (X)HTML was, but I'd never made a web page other than some rubbish at GCSE IT. I have been a C# programmer for 2-3 years, so I do have a general awareness of programming and mark-up languages.

The good: His explanations are clear, and with a good previous level of computer wisdom you will get to grips with the theory and...
Published on 18 Oct. 2010 by George Powell

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Content is good, very verbose
I really like the content. But hate the writing style. So verbose, esp. those step by step stuff. I buy this book not for how to use a text editor to create the file, so why bother show me how to add line by line? Just show the whole css and highlight some of the tricks like other programming books do. If writing that way, the book can shrink to maybe 50%, all meat...
Published 23 months ago by Marshal


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Very good if you want to learn CSS, but drags on a bit., 18 Oct. 2010
By 
George Powell (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
My previous experience: I knew what (X)HTML was, but I'd never made a web page other than some rubbish at GCSE IT. I have been a C# programmer for 2-3 years, so I do have a general awareness of programming and mark-up languages.

The good: His explanations are clear, and with a good previous level of computer wisdom you will get to grips with the theory and power of CSS without having to read a section twice. (I can't really judge how this book would be for a complete beginner, but he certainly doesn't presume any previous knowledge so I would recommend this to a beginner.)

The bad:

As said in another review, he tells you how to use a text editor: "place your curser...", "press enter twice" etc. This is annoying and patronising if you know what you're doing.

He repeats himself over and over throughout each section. I must have been told what floating a block level element does over 5 times in different chapters.

His style of creating CSS sometimes conflicts with the whole purpose of CSS: To write HTML markup that is seperate from the layout/style. (e.g. He names classes after the position on the page they will be, something warned against in CSS Mastery)

I bought this for the Kindle, and the formatting of titles/sub-titles sometimes is a bit messed up. Still perfectly readable though.

Overall:

A very good book for learning CSS theory and techniques. It lost a star for repeating itself too much and therefore being a bit of a drag to finish.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 3 Sept. 2010
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
With books of this type I suppose that the satisfaction derived is a question of how much you learn and I learnt a lot! Suffice to say that this is the only time I have taken the trouble to write a review but this book really merits one. It is well written, well structured and has exactly what I needed. The examples are very good and are easy to implement in a real situation. The support on the publisher's web is also excellent.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 24 Dec. 2009
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
Love the book. Am pretty new to web-design. Only worked through "Build your own website the right way", which gives a good foundation in both XHTML and CSS, but was looking for more info on CSS.

The missing manual provides just that in an easy to follow way. Love it. I might yet turn into a computer geek if I can find more manuals like this one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of the clearest Technical books I have ever read, 7 Jun. 2011
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
This book has been at my side since I bought it recently, unlike others which gather dust.
The writing is superb, the technical content pitched equally between reference and tutorial.
Never one for the step by step approach of tutorials, I found myself using this approach and gaining real understanding of a topic, and crucially, usable CSS at the end.
The price is very, very good too. If you want to demystify CSS, buy this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A bit wordy but still good, 2 Nov. 2009
By 
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
This is a reasonably well written and informative book. I would recommend it to someone with an understanding of HTML and maybe already a little CSS. It covers CSS from the beginning so thats not too important but a knowledge of HTML and how pages are constructed is.

My biggest problem with this is just how many words the author uses. Talk about 'why use one word when I can think of a thousand plus'. I can understand having to spell things out to people but this takes it too far; the book could have had a third less pages.

The book assumes a knowledge of HTML, which implies you have at least a basic understanding of how HTML files are constructed and can use a pc. I don't need to read an instruction like 1. In your favourite text editor open the text file tutorial1.txt and save it as home.html in the folder blah blah blah. 2. Move your cursor and click just after the <style> tag but before the </style> tag, which should be after the <head> but before the and press enter (return) then type #H1 ..... Seriously, it's like that the whole way through the book.

Even in the advanced stages, where you would think the reader has elevated himself above idiot and now knows a thing or two, it's the same. The instructions are still bloated and spelt out as if to a simpleton. The cherry for me was after telling me to press enter there was a (return) in brackets. I'm a bit too thick to know what 'enter' means, can you give me another name for it!

The above in simple terms. 1. Copy tutorial1.txt to your folder, rename to home.html and open ready for editing. 2. Create style #H1 within the <style> tags. Simple right? You shouldn't even need to tell people to enter a style between the <style> tags after they've done it a few times.

I personally think that the Sams teach yourself HTML and CSS in 24 hours was easier to follow and a lot clearer. It's only because 'Sams' is now a little old and the css element is more general compared to the in-depth techniques and coverage in the 'the missing manual' that I bought this. If 'Sams' updates their book with more advanced CSS techniques then it would no doubt be better than this.

Apart from the overuse of words, this book is still quite useful and informative. There's plenty of little tips and comments on things such as cross-browser compatibility and in-depth coverage on all the most useful techniques and latest standards. It could be better but you could do a lot worse. It just about clings on to 4 stars since most of the time it's pretty good.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Does what it says on the cover!, 15 Aug. 2011
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
I am a self taught web designer with a print design background who has always struggled to get sites looking right using old school table layouts. This book has shown me the error of my ways and I'm a CSS convert now!

The book is really well written both for the absolute beginner and for someone like me with a little knowledge. I particularly like the way it builds your knowledge through the chapters, starting with simple concepts and moving on to more complex information. It also explains, in layman's terms, why you should use CSS.

The tutorials are really useful, the book is well written, humourous without trying too hard or being patronising and the author even suggests where you may be able to skim a section if it has little relevance in the 'real world'. There is a nice balance between the stuff which helps you create attractive pages and the necessary techie info around different browsers, page validation
On the whole thoroughly good purchase and would recommend. I don't often give things top marks, but this book does exactly what it sets out to do.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Flourescent light moment, 3 Mar. 2010
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
You know you pull the string on a flourescent(strip) light, it flashes a few times before the light comes on. Well, my CSS has been at the flickering stage for a while but now the light has come on! (Oh, thats how they do it.)
I have been a fan of the missing manuals since Dreamweaver 8 and they have moved me from complete beginner (and I really mean zero knowledge) to probably intermediate designer/ developer.
Great humour. Easy to read. logical structure. tips, boxes and references that enable you to skim through on a superficial level for basic understanding then go back for more detail. The external links/ reference are fantastic( I usually highlight them/ bookmark them as I go for future ref.)
I tend not to follow the tutorials exactly but use them more as a guide for my own building. Online resource is outstanding. Just found the Xampp set up pages that are so simple - took me ages using other sources.
CSS Missing Manual is compulsory reading. Don't leave as long as I did.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Should be re-titled "CSS -The Official Manual", 12 Nov. 2009
By 
K. Le Breton (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
This book has got it all! Learnt more in a week than I thought possible! From the basics to tricks I had seen done but could never get my head around how they were done! All written in an easy to absorb style that encourages experiment but still holds your hand though the trickier bits. This is one of several "Missing Manuals" that I have read, Microsoft Project 2007, Photoshop CS4, Dreamweaver CS4, all seem to have managed a far better job than the official manuals. CSS, of course, has no official manual --- until now!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic Book, 13 Aug. 2011
By 
A. Eastham "andy19048" (Swindon, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
This book is well put together and has some great examples. It completely explains the correct way to format web pages. You can skim through it and get a lot of useful information, or you can go through all the examples via the online source code and really experience the learning process.

I had a good few "Ahh that's how you do that" and "Ahh, that's why it didn't work properly..." moments when just skimming the book.

If you don't already know absolutely everything about styling web pages using CSS, you'll be really glad you read this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Only CSS Book You'll Need, 9 May 2010
This review is from: CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) (Paperback)
I have to say, I absolutely love this book. It's just so insightful, even for those who might think they already know enough CSS. It even goes as far as to provide a brief recap of the HTML basics to get any total newbies started, but it does assume you know at least some HTML prior to reading.

If you're thinking about getting into CSS, or even if you just want to improve upon what you already know (the book includes an entire section on CSS3 AND loads of fixes for Internet Explorer throughout), then I really can't recommend this book enough.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 25 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals)
CSS: The Missing Manual (Missing Manuals) by David Sawyer McFarland (Paperback - 31 Aug. 2009)
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews