Customer Reviews


10 Reviews
5 star:
 (3)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pithy and excellent
In contrast to so many programming books that are padded with chat and screen dumps, this one deals with the fundamental concepts. By all means buy another Access application design and programming book that leads you chapter by chapter through the construction steps, but own this one too. The author is an emeritus professor of maths and his intelligence is obvious in...
Published on 9 May 2003 by Ian Buckley

versus
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The code nuts and bolts of the database
People should aim to develop databases in the most standard way to minimise the possibility that it can go wrong. Thus, the initial aim of developing databases should be to avoid having to go into the code and concentrate on the high level development tools already available. Utilising the basic methods of developing the database is hard enough in it's own right without...
Published on 28 April 2011 by jimatwork


Most Helpful First | Newest First

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Pithy and excellent, 9 May 2003
By 
Ian Buckley (Toronto, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Access Database Design & Programming (Nutshell Handbooks) (Paperback)
In contrast to so many programming books that are padded with chat and screen dumps, this one deals with the fundamental concepts. By all means buy another Access application design and programming book that leads you chapter by chapter through the construction steps, but own this one too. The author is an emeritus professor of maths and his intelligence is obvious in this nice text. In a world with ever more computer technologies and languages we need authors like Prof Roman to flag the important information. (Comments refer to 2nd edition)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars straight to the point, informative and well worth the money, 27 Jan 2000
By A Customer
This book is a must for readers who are at the stage where they have mastered the GUI side of Access but want to learn more about the nuts and bolts.
The style of writing is easy to understand while still conveying the required information at the correct level.
Probably one of the better books on a technical subject that I have bought.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars The code nuts and bolts of the database, 28 April 2011
People should aim to develop databases in the most standard way to minimise the possibility that it can go wrong. Thus, the initial aim of developing databases should be to avoid having to go into the code and concentrate on the high level development tools already available. Utilising the basic methods of developing the database is hard enough in it's own right without having to understand the implications of dropping in and out of code and the intricacies of how the code is structured. This book is a reference,but not a guide, for the latter. It may be useful in that context but respect has to be given to the knowledge and time necessary to develop at the code level. To develop at the code level you need to understand the structure of the language being used and the organisation of the code it integrates with. You also need to be clear on the best practice structuring of the code you are adding and the desired interface. Don't just wander into coding! Avoid it if you can but if you need to you will need to get a better conceptual understanding than is offered in this book.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Concise and to the point, 25 Jan 1999
By A Customer
This book is not for beginners in computer databases as rightly stated in the first few pages. The meaty nature of the content suggest that it is not for the faint-hearted. Simply, it is a book for the needy professional who cannot afford to waste time and money on volumes of story books.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Difficult reading!, 21 Sep 2000
By A Customer
Perhaps it is unfair of me to critique Mr Roman's book: I hung on until chapter 4 and then gave up. Steven Roman appears to be a talented mathematician but his sentence construction and command of the English language is, at best, tiring. I was attracted by the promise of some formal database theory (I did my Computer Science degree over 10 years ago!). Alas, there are many other books on database theory which are much better written.
I would have continued through to the Access 2000 implementation stage had it not been for Steven Roman's comments about DAO versus ADO. I got the impression he thinks ADO is an irritating distraction introduced by Microsoft, and DAO is certainly the model to stay with. I am disinclined to read an author's work on (the essential) ADO if his heart is not in it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Okay for abstract principles, poor on practicalities., 27 May 2000
By A Customer
This book is okay on presenting the principles of database layout, but doesn't live up to its front cover claim "what you really need to know to develop with access". The book explains some underlying DB concepts quite well, but the author clearly did not have a list of common, practical problems in mind when he put pen to paper.
My expectations from an O'Reilly book are high, and this book doesn't match up. Three indicative irritations were:
* The section on Jet RecordSet properties, which ends "Of course, getting documentation on these properties is another matter. Let me know if you find any."
* The bit on manipulating dates: "If you need to manipulate dates or times in your programs, you should probably spend some time with the Access VBA help file. (Start by looking under Date Data Type)"
* No information on using autonumbered fields, which didn't even make the index. If you want to know which code is best to recover the data you just entered into an autonumbered row, you probably won't be able to work it out from this book.
The book is mainly written in terms of the earlier Microsoft DAO technology, with a single chapter on ADO tacked on. My (2nd ed) version does not address MSDE or Access 2000 specifics, of course. The language used is VBA, so issues that crop up with other languages, like VBScript's lack of typing, are not covered. Writing with later upsizing in mind is also not addressed, although some differences between SQL-92 and Access SQL are mentioned in passing. There is also little indication of how complete the SQL information is.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1.0 out of 5 stars Too much theory, 29 Nov 2007
By 
M. Ahmed (UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I've got access to an ebook version on the net library. I wont recommend this book to anyone the writer uses the same example of a database for books in a library throughout the book going through various database theory using Mathematical notations which is very confusing and boring to follow. This is a very badly written book with no reader interaction more like a university Thesis.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4.0 out of 5 stars An excellent explanation of Access Database Theory., 5 July 1999
By A Customer
A book that explains how to design a database in an Access development context, without first explaining how to use a computer. Bigger on substance than many books three times it's size. Thoroughly recommended for beginners and semi - professional users alike.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars MS Access or Quantum Physics?, 28 April 1998
By A Customer
The author's highly technical, uninspiring writing style makes even the most straight forward MS Access concept seem like an advanced problem in quantum physics. This book actually succeeds in making it harder to understand MS Access. The sign of a good technical author is that they make complex topics clear and intuitive to understand. This book does exactly the opposite.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent book for newbie database programmers, 5 Sep 1999
By A Customer
If you are a newbie to database design and are interested in database programming this is the book for you. It is a very good companion book to Microsofts Running Access 97.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

Access Database Design & Programming (Nutshell Handbooks)
Access Database Design & Programming (Nutshell Handbooks) by PhD Steven Roman (Paperback - 17 Jan 2002)
£21.82
In stock
Add to basket Add to wishlist
Only search this product's reviews