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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New music history
I must admit, I'm an avid reader of music biographies. There have been a glut of them recently, from autobiographies to band history. The thing I like most about this book is that the bands covered are not the usual suspects.

So we get an overview of the American indie/underground scene written with great care and attention by Grubbs. The format is similar...
Published on 15 Oct 2009 by R. Shaikh

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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great bands, badly written book
I take my hat off to Eric Grubbs for endeavouring to write a book about these excellent and extremely influential bands, many of whom have often been ignored by more mainstream histories of rock, punk and alternative music. I'm a huge fan of a lot of the bands covered here and so I was really looking forward to reading this.

Unfortunately, the book is poorly...
Published on 4 Sep 2010 by NRKS


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars New music history, 15 Oct 2009
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R. Shaikh "presstoeject" (London, England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: POST: A Look at the Influence of Post-Hardcore-1985-2007 (Paperback)
I must admit, I'm an avid reader of music biographies. There have been a glut of them recently, from autobiographies to band history. The thing I like most about this book is that the bands covered are not the usual suspects.

So we get an overview of the American indie/underground scene written with great care and attention by Grubbs. The format is similar to 'Our Band Could Be Your Life', but looks at some of the more recent crossover acts rather than the SST-heavy aforementioned book. I did like some of the bands already so any new material on them, (and there was much), was welcome, but a few I had only vaguely listened to and yet still found their stories interesting and informative.

It is sub strapped as being a book about post-hardcore but this doesn't particularly square with my interpretation of the term. Not that this is a problem, the bands researched are all mentioned on the cover so we know what's inside. One interesting aspect is the problems that commercial success seem to cause for bands or individuals. I must admit again that that does appear to be many underground acts experience of either 'the majors' or a certain level of recognition/praise. More happily, many of these bands have returned to their DIY roots and produced more good work after being written off by many. Good luck to them.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great bands, badly written book, 4 Sep 2010
This review is from: POST: A Look at the Influence of Post-Hardcore-1985-2007 (Paperback)
I take my hat off to Eric Grubbs for endeavouring to write a book about these excellent and extremely influential bands, many of whom have often been ignored by more mainstream histories of rock, punk and alternative music. I'm a huge fan of a lot of the bands covered here and so I was really looking forward to reading this.

Unfortunately, the book is poorly written (often infuriatingly so!). Grubbs skates over a number of really interesting areas, for example trying to sum up the whole 30 year history of Dischord Records in a single chapter, meaning incredibly influential bands like Nation of Ulysses and Smart Went Crazy only get passing mentions. Instead the author often chooses to focuses on baffling areas of minutia (does anyone really care that Hot Water Music's Chuck Ragan had his fishing rod thrown away by his old landlord?). For me the writing style and tone often grated too (there's lots of repetition and Grubbs seems to always try and end every paragraph on some sort of cliff hanger). This book's clearly been self-published and as a result is in need of a really decent edit.

That said there are some good insights in here, and the chapters where Grubbs has been able to interview the players involved with the bands (Jawbox, Sunny Day Real Estate, Braid) make for engaging reading. So, POST is certainly worth a look, but Our Band Could Be Your Life it unfortunately isn't. I'd recommend getting hold of Mark Andersen's Dance of Days or We Owe You Nothing: The Punk Planet Interviews instead.
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POST: A Look at the Influence of Post-Hardcore-1985-2007
POST: A Look at the Influence of Post-Hardcore-1985-200
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by Eric Grubbs (Paperback - 25 Aug 2008)
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