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107 of 115 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lee Child is back in form
The first and best news is that Lee Child is back in form with "Gone Tomorrow". While not the all time best Reacher novel that I have read, this is a more than satisfactory addition to the series. It involves some truly unpleasant villains, a politician with a deeply guarded secret, a missing son and plenty of tension. One thing I love but also find quite disconcerting...
Published on 15 April 2009 by Julia Flyte

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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Time for a change of direction
This is the book which made it obvious to me that not only was Lee Child writing covernote puffery for Jeff Abbott, he was actually reading the books as well. Of course, it could just be the post 9/11 atmosphere in the US but the way that those shady public/private sector security industry dudes are drifting into the Reacher books has unnerving similarities...
Published on 28 July 2009 by Mr Smith


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107 of 115 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Lee Child is back in form, 15 April 2009
By 
Julia Flyte - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) (Hardcover)
The first and best news is that Lee Child is back in form with "Gone Tomorrow". While not the all time best Reacher novel that I have read, this is a more than satisfactory addition to the series. It involves some truly unpleasant villains, a politician with a deeply guarded secret, a missing son and plenty of tension. One thing I love but also find quite disconcerting when I'm reading a Reacher novel is the way that he deliberately seeks out and provokes the bad guys. It's so much the opposite of the way that I would behave that I find it quite nerve-wracking to read. And in this book, he does it a LOT.

It starts with Reacher on a New York subway in the small hours of the morning. He spots a woman, Susan Marks, whose behaviour meets every criteria for a suicide bomber. She's not. But she is a woman in trouble. Reacher can't help Susan, but he can't let the matter rest until he finds out what was behind her state of mind and finds the people who drove her to that point. Although at various times he recruits her brother and a friendly police officer as allies, essentially this is Reacher taking on the bad guys on his own.

The first half of the book is all set up and it's quite gradual. Reacher is a little slow off the mark: there are a couple of revelations that seemed pretty obvious to me, but which take some time to emerge. On the other hand, I wasn't sure for quite some time who the villains would turn out to be, which I enjoyed. In the second half, Reacher goes after the villains: this half is dead exciting and includes some of the most graphic descriptions of violence that I remember Lee Child writing.

There is one central implausibility: Reacher is told repeatedly that he'll be in deep trouble if he finds out a particular secret. But when he does find it out, suddenly it doesn't seem to matter that he knows. Child also leaves a couple of key plot elements unresolved. And the obligatory roll in the sack feels just that: out of place and only there because it's expected. However, at the end of the day these are just annoyances, not critical flaws.

Unusually, this book is written in the first person (as if Reacher is narrating): only three other Lee Child books have used this. It's not my preference given that Reacher is such an enigma, but it works fine. It's a great read: enjoy!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Time for a change of direction, 28 July 2009
This review is from: Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) (Hardcover)
This is the book which made it obvious to me that not only was Lee Child writing covernote puffery for Jeff Abbott, he was actually reading the books as well. Of course, it could just be the post 9/11 atmosphere in the US but the way that those shady public/private sector security industry dudes are drifting into the Reacher books has unnerving similarities.

Overall, this is a decent Reacher book, while some way off the best. My concern is that Reacher is gradually transforming into both an out and out implausible superhero, which makes it difficult for me to really care about the outcome, and someone who would be of such a level of interest to the authorities that his continuing in the lifestyle he has stretches credulity beyond breaking point.

This has become so pronounced in recent books that it is worryingly reminiscent of Matthew Reilly's progression towards the truly stupid Scarecrow, and consequently me losing interest in the series. Back to basics for the next installment please.
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52 of 57 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Far from Jack's best but big improvement on last novel, 24 April 2009
By 
Bobo (Javea , Spain) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) (Hardcover)
As someone who has devoured all of Lee Child's books about the maverick crusader Jack Reacher I was hugely disappointed with last years novel " Nothing to Lose " which I thought was merely a tired rehash of previous stories. Had this franchise had run it's course ? not on your Nelly !, Gone Tomorrow is a vast improvement with Jack waging a one manned battle against some heavyweight bad guys ( and girls ! ) on the streets of New York.
A welcome return to form with a tight and well structured storyline not Jack's best adventure but still a great read and miles better than most other contemporary thrillers
Get it read !!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Gripping, plausible, interesting and satisfying - TERRIFIC, 14 Jan 2011
By 
Brian Butterly "Varied Taste" (Dorking UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This novel had me sitting spellbound on the train when it arrived at the terminus! I was so engrossed with the story I was not aware of the time passing and the arrival at my destination. I was totally absorbed. I loved the various characters; I found the story, set entirely in New York, to be plausible, interesting and compelling. The villains were nasty, very, very nasty. Some of the good guys were also nasty to our hero but some of the good guys were supportive to our hero.
The pace is fantastic, the twists and turns are surprising as they were not contrived or convoluted. To me this is the best read for many months and I actually have it as one of the best from Lee Child - which is praise indeed.
The story starts well and grabbed my attention. the pace and interest does not falter and keeps up the high standard to the end. Then the ending is satisfying, complete and informative. It is hard to talk about some of the plot without either repeating the "blurb" or giving something away. Suffice to state, Jack reacher is strong and tough, his intellect shines through and his observations tell you what you need to know. Highly recommend this book.
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28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Totally average, 2 May 2009
By 
G. Nisbet (Glasgow, UK) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) (Hardcover)
After Bad Luck and Trouble I skipped Nothing To Lose. Reading the reviews convinced me it just wasn't worth the trouble. Early reviews for Gone Tomorrow however suggested a return to form. Which form though?

Certainly not Killing Floor or Persuader form. This is similar to the far superior The Visitor in that it's more mystery, less action. I'm fine with that. What I'm not fine with however are the outrageous liberties Lee Child is taking with Reachers pragmatic abilities.

We know Reacher is gifted but Child has been taking the rip for a while. (Remember how he located his old partner in a diner in Vegas?!) This intrinsic radar ability is prevalent more than ever here. How Reacher continually manages to track his quarry through NEW YORK totally drains any credibilty from the book. We're not talking a rural town here. Reacher knows what street, what hotel, what house and it's just ridiculous. I'm all for artistic license but Child has gone too far. How Reacher works out where the USB stick is tipped me over the edge. It was a deux ex machina and almost ruined the book.

It's not all doom and gloom however. The narrative is interesting enough and it kept me reading but Reacher is becoming almost a parody of himself. The mystery was good but with a more realistic, visceral approach it could have been excellent. The liberties in credibility however have dragged it firmly into the land of fantasy. Not where I want Reacher to be at all. Not to this extent anyway. Let's make the next one even a little plausible. Please? Thanks.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Gripping But Slipping, 7 May 2009
By 
This review is from: Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) (Hardcover)
Lee Child has the gift of writing highly formulaic thrillers that turn into immediate bestsellers. "Gone Tomorrow " will do the same, even though the formula is getting tired.

"Gone Tomorrow" is the 13th book in the Jack Reacher series and is just like the others except that it is written in the first person. Reacher is a retired major in the elite 101st Division of the Military Police. He is the ultimate loner. He has no home, no commitments and no possessions other than the clothes on his back, an expired passport and an ATM card (which he uses to access his military pension to pay for cheap hotels and new underwear). He does not even have a backpack, or a jacket, or a wallet. He does not wear a watch because he can always tell the time without one (except when sedated - wholly unnecessarily- by a tranquilizer dart usually reserved for gorillas). He does not carry a weapon because he himself is a perfect killing machine and if he does need one, he can always requisition a Heckler and Koch MP5 SD (magazine capacity: 32 rounds, three settings) in the field. Reacher's lifestyle is the first thing that demands the reader's suspension of disbelief.

In this book, as usual, Reacher is crisscrossing the USA hoping to stumble on a sinister conspiracy into which he can insert himself even though it is none of his business. Conveniently, he encounters a potential suicide bomber on the New York Subway. He identifies this risk by running through an Israeli Defence Forces checklist in his head (seasonally inappropriate clothing, prayer mumbling etc) while ignoring a counter checklist of offsetting evidence (middle of the night, Caucasian female subject etc). His bungled attempt to intervene leads to savage encounters with al Qaeda (they WERE involved, after all) the NYPD (which also generously supplies the love or at least the obligatory but brief sex interest), a 600 person Federal task force and a US Senatorial candidate with a past. Everyone is searching for a piece of evidence that is potentially embarrassing to the US Government, the candidate or Osama bin Laden or all of the above. Lots of bad guys are satisfyingly dispatched and numerous arrogant Feds are hoist on their own dart guns.

The plot is, in other words, risible. The secret at the heart of the story is not worth protecting, its revelation anticlimactic in the extreme.The nature and behavior of the two female villains are insultingly implausible. The malevolent incompetence of the Feds ("this is the new world") is just a lazy plot device. If the agents of Child's host country (he is an expatriate Brit) are as sinister and as sensitive about cover up as he suggests, he had better watch his back. Especially if a shiny black Crown Vic - the Standard LY not the Police Interceptor model)-draws up beside him and three men, wearing mid-range blue suits with a slight bagginess in their left shoulders, step out.

While many thriller writers conduct exhaustive research, the homework behind this book - the technical specs of a Kawasaki R142A subway car, the magazine capacities of various firearms, a superficial history of Afghanistan, US military acronyms - could have been conducted on a laptop while sipping a tall, skinny latte in the local Starbucks (but not by Reacher - he is virtually technically illiterate).

Without question, Child still has the gift of writing great suspense. His sparse prose, the elemental violence and the relentless, Cyborgian logic of Reacher's character, build and release tension in a wonderfully cathartic way. But, it feels as if Child is bored with his formula. There are repetitions from the past books, the plotting, the research and the character development are lazy. Gripping but slipping. The franchise is being milked.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reacher on Top Form!, 31 July 2012
By 
Brett H "pentangle" (Brighton) - See all my reviews
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   
I have read quite a number of Reacher books in the last year or so. They each have the same elements. Reacher being highly analytical and dissecting situations to the minutiae. Add in some irresistible violence - totally irresistible if you happen to be on the wrong side of him! Plus a little romantic interest and that's about it really. I did feel that Jack was a little short changed in the latter department this time round, but apart from that it was all there in force. In the hands of some authors the result would be predictable and formulaic, but Lee Child writes so skilfully that one never feels that one is reading a rehash of the same material.

I generally end up rating these tales as four or five stars and to my mind this one worked rather well. It starts off with Reacher at his analytical best and his cerebral skills feature rather more prominently this time round as he is able to come to conclusions which escape others. As is usual, the story develops at a fair pace and really does not stall at any stage. Hence it could be described as an archetypal page turner. The conclusion works well, though I did feel that there was a major unanswered question at the end. Let's just say it concerned goats. Once you have read Gone Tomorrow you will see what I mean!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Taxi driver, 8 Nov 2009
By 
Ms. J. Bedford (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
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This review is from: Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) (Hardcover)
Another great Lee Child book with twists and turns at every chapter. Lee Child never ceases to amaze with his story telling. The reason I have not given this 5 star which Lee Child books usually deserve is he is just getting a tad nasty with explicit descriptions of torture. While I can appreciate that this kind of torture goes on in the real world, I really did not want to read about it in my living room.

My 75yr old mother and I swap similar books and she read this one before I did. After asking her what she thought about it (and we are Lee Child addicts!)she said it was "okay, but I didn't like what they did to the taxi driver" and after reading it I have to agree. I recently was lucky enough to go to an "Afternoon with Lee Child and his brother" which was a chat a book signing. So, I have just read his brother's book as well which has a similar torture scene depicted and it is kind of putting me off them both - which is a shame as the whole series is truly brilliant.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Another good book from Mr Child, 17 Aug 2009
If you have read other Jack Reacher novels and enjoyed them, then I'm sure you will enjoy this one. It is written in much the same style, although this time, it is actually Jack reacher himselfs who narrates the story, which in my mind actually helps the story move along more quickly, if that is possible. From the attention grabbing opening sequence to the grand finale shoot-out, Mr Child's writing style will keep those pages turning and he has a great knack of finishing one chapter with a throw-away sentence that convinces you to say to yourself "okay, one more chapter before I put this down". The reason I have not stretched to 5 stars for this review is that there is a clumsy character interaction when Reacher has a love scene with one of the female characters; totally un-necessary (in my opinion) and did not build on either of the characters or the storyline - I suspect this was included for the no doubt imminent Jack Reacher movies.

In summary, a good Jack Reacher novel, lots of twists and turns, lots of methodological reasoning from Jack as he goes about his business and, as always a grand finale that keeps you going to the end. I enjoyed this book.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Is it time for Jack Reacher to retire?, 30 July 2009
By 
Christine L (Berkshire, England) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) (Hardcover)
I was tempted to give Jack Reacher's latest adventures 3 stars, but ended up giving it 4 simply because this book was so much better than the previous one. After the last book I wasn't intending to buy this one, at least not in hardback, but my husband wanted to read it so I ended up getting it.

Having been a Jack Reacher fan for a decade, I've been prepared to accept a lot of poetic licence by Lee Child. I know that it's not supposed to be a factual account of a real life person and I'm more than happy for an author to bend reality to suit their books. However, in the case of Jack Reacher it's starting to feel a bit too much.

We all know and love Reacher as an honourable rogue, who's prepared to stand up against the big guys and fight for the little guy, but his personality is turning into an oxymoron. Where Lee Child is going wrong is letting a character who is both intelligent and street smart be so incredibly stupid at times. I know it's been needed to move the story in the direction Child wanted it to go, but I don't think I'm the only one it grates on and it takes away from the enjoyment of the book.

I hate to say it, but I'm starting to think that it's time to retire Reacher now. I've absolutely loved so many of the previous books, but in the last couple of years they've started lacking something. Maybe Lee Child has just done everything he can with this character and is starting to repeat himself? I like his style of writing and would really like to see what he can do with a different character.

All that said, this is NOT the book to introduce yourself to Jack Reacher. Go and look at the back catalogue (but not Nothing To Lose) and there are plenty of books that are fantastic page turners. If you already know and love him, you'll accept the shortcomings.

Please Lee Child, do something to win us jaded Jack Reacher fans back for your next book!
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Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13)
Gone Tomorrow: (Jack Reacher 13) by Lee Child (Hardcover - 23 April 2009)
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