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5 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on 17 August 2005
I had just finished reading The Algebraist by Iain M Banks, and was really looking forward to getting into The Traveller. I lasted 3 chapters. It's not often I don't finish a book but I just felt I couldn't continue. The style is mechanical, the backstory is handed to you on a plate, the characters seem one dimensional. One trick is to read the dialogue (of which incidentally there is a huge amount) and to see if you can distinguish between the voices. It was impossible with this book. Maya sounds like Thorn sounds like Boone. In the end this is unsustainable, stilted and highly unsatisfying.
Really disappointing, grid or no grid.
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11 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on 12 December 2005
I have a number of problems with this book:

1. It is very poorly written. The actual quality of the English is really bad. Sentences and descriptions are clunky and cliched. While economy of style is to be applauded in many writers there is more to grammar and puncutation than subject, verb, object, full stop (and the odd comma).

2. The evocation of place is utterly unatmospheric. The descriptions of London and its geography appear to be derived from a map and tourist guides. Describing a pavement as a "sidewalk", Arsenal Football Ground as a "stadium" just jars awfully.

3. The characters are almost universally one dimensional and stereotypical. The Corrigan brothers are particularly irritating in this regard having no emotional depth and little subtlety; our heroine, although supposedly cold, actually ends up as dull.

4. So what are JTH's favourite films/books - not difficult to guess given how utterly derivative some of the plot devices and characters are. Lets start with Highlander - samurai sword (made by Masamune)given to Connor by his guide; fights to be the one (there can be only one Traveller)and ends up with the prize; anything by Dan Brown - sensitive intellectual type meets emotionally retarded but beautiful woman to battle against the forces of some ancient sect with a roman kind of name (Opus Dei/Tabula) - and don't forget that every famous thinker/religious figure over the last 100 years was actually a member of this great thinker sect aka Priory of Sion or the Knights Templar; the Matrix (mentioned in other reviews); Robert Ludlum - don't matter where you go or what you do they nasty "corporation" will find you with their high tech gadgetry; Stephen King - just beneath the surface of this world there are lots of different realms with some funky stuff going on. You can go on and one with just about every populist film or book over the last 10 years appears to get a mention or nod (I hope knowing - otherwise its worse that I thought!).

5. This would all be fine were it not for the utterly daft theology it peddles along the way. The fact that the writer goes by an Indian name and claims to Live off the Grid is just risible rather than enigmatic.

All this and clearly so desperately wanting a film deal
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 13 April 2006
This book is a goodish fictional read. It is is not as claimed the new "da vinci code" - whatever that means. The writing reminds me of a childrens book and indeed it could be if it were not for the occassional heavy violence. I would recommend it as a light hearted read and I will probably buy the next installments, it is to be the first of a trilogy.
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 14 August 2005
In the tradition of "Behind the Dark curtain" by Adam W. Gibson, and "The da Vinci Code." by Dan Brown comes "The traveler" a unique look into the dark order thriller genre. All three books are worth buying. "behind the Dark Curtain" is my fav out of the three.
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5 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 22 September 2005
The most important thing to consider when thinking of buying this book is that it is the first in a series. It really just sets the scene for the books to follow.
The second dissapointing aspect of the book is it's lack of any real flair. I felt the fight 'scenes' in the book were written in a very cold, almost matter of fact kind of way, when the writer could have really given some dynamism to the story I was left feeling a little flat.
The topics raised in the book are thought provoking, read it if you feel absolutely compelled to, but my advice would be to give it a miss and read 1984 again.
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5 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on 20 August 2005
well i liked it. very readable and just a little bit different.
cant wait for the next one.
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2 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on 25 February 2006
Well this started off on a bad footing for me - describing Arsenal fans as 'thugs'! Being a life long Gooner I was less than impressed!
The Traveller took its time to get started and by the time it did finally get going it was over! It wasn't a bad book but I have read better, maybe the next installment will be an improvement.
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6 of 17 people found the following review helpful
This is very poor. No new ideas, and deeply pedestrian writing. Like the other reviewer I found both the blurb and the cover very misleading.

If you want "good" trashy sci-fi go and read anything by Alan Moore.
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on 29 July 2009
What a load of rubbish.. And that's exactly how the book ended up. I ripped it up and threw it way to save anyone I know suffering through the mindless drivel.
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2 of 8 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon 21 July 2006
I found this readable and enjoyable if not a classic. The characters are developed sufficiently for you to care about them and the action keeps coming. Good enough for me to buy the next one when it is in paperback but not good enough to have me seeking out the first publication date for it.

In the meantime, if you are looking for seriously original and creative fantasy try Iain M Banks. His books require a little more work to read but the investment is worth it.
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