Customer Reviews


1,573 Reviews
5 star:
 (639)
4 star:
 (233)
3 star:
 (204)
2 star:
 (172)
1 star:
 (325)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favourable review
The most helpful critical review


117 of 127 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Abridged
Very enjoyable. However it should be noted that this is an abridged version. It dosen't tell you that in the details.
Published on 18 Mar. 2005 by G. Palmer

versus
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A rough sketch rather than a masterpiece
I read this book on the recommendation of a couple of friends, where the wife thought it was a good airport novel and the husband loathed it so much he could not bring himself to finish it. I tend to agree with the wife: the Da Vinci code is something that will keep you busy on a plane or a train, particularly if it is a Friday evening flight and you are tired. The book...
Published on 26 Dec. 2004


Most Helpful First | Newest First

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Six million buyers can't be wrong?, 23 Mar. 2004
There is a certain truth to that. Dan Brown must have done something right when he wrote the book that is the biggest success since Harry Potter.
The first part of The da Vinci Code is brilliant. From page one the story takes a firm grip on the reader and it is difficult or even impossible to put down the book for the first 150 or so pages.
One can raise many objections to the simple prose, the stereotype characters and the unlikely chain of events. But Brown presents a story which is told in a deceivingly simple way, when in fact very few could accomplish it. Coupled with an absorbing game of riddles and codes, and an irresistible two thousand-year conspiracy theory, it is not hard to see why this has become such a success.
Most critics have targeted the revisionist history that is presented. It is true that if this were non-fiction, it would rank as one of the historical pseudo-scientific classics beside the works of Graham Hancock and von Däniken. But this is a work of fiction. Complaining about historic falsehood is like complaining about the physics in Star Wars or the science in the X-Files.
The problem is that about halfway through the story Brown abandons his own recipe for success and the story loses tempo. The many alleged cultural references to the Holy Grail become boring and at some places ridiculous. A bit of the magic is lost, and even though it gets better towards the end it never really catches up again. But you shouldn’t miss this book, it is worth the first part alone. Or read it at least so you know what everybody is talking about.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


48 of 55 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Am I missing something here?, 16 July 2005
I will be totally honest and confess that all the hype about this book put me off reading it for a long time. However, it was given to me as a birthday present and it would have been rude to not give it a try. Well, I've read it and I really can't see what the fuss is all about.
The writing style is stilted and clumsy. There are many errors and don't get me started on the way in which Mr Brown continually manufactures cliff-hangers for almost every chapter.If that is the only way he can make his readers want to read on then so be it, but it annoyed me beyond measure. I mean, how many times can someone open a box, gasp in disbelief at the contents and then not describe them for another three chapters?
My favourite spate of bad writing comes quite early on, during the drive from the Louvre to the American Embassy. Sophie has been thinking back about "the terrible thing" she saw her grandfather doing without ever letting the reader in on the secret. However, the moment she decides to think about it is when she is trying to escape the police in a high speed chase. She is driving and I'm pretty sure she would be better off concentrating on the road.
Best of all though is the drive from the Louvre to the embassy. On page 190, Sophie sets off, knowing that it is less than half a mile to get there. On page 192, after driving directly towards the embassy, she sighs with relief as now there is less than a mile to go. I've never been to Paris but the authorities really should do something about the spatial rift that apparently exists there. Generally, when I drive towards something, I get nearer to it, not further away.
The ending is very weak too but I won't spoil it for you. The author has already done that.
It's not a terrible book but it could have been so much better. Read "The Name Of The Rose" if you want an intelligent thriller. If you must read this then at least see the flaws and appreciate that they stretch into the supposed revelatory theories as well.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Why can't we give no stars?, 5 Jun. 2008
By 
Rachel Bridgeman (Wales) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Da Vinci Code (Paperback)
This was a truly dreadful book that I struggled to finish as part of a book club selection and the awful time I had is indelibly etched into my brain.
Poorly drawn characters, artificial dialogue, obvious plot twists and gaping inconsistencies you could drive a truck through.
I thought it was awful though it seems sacrilege to sya it when so many people love it but that doesn't make it a good book.
It may ahve sold millions but it doesn't mean that everyone who bought a copy liked it.
I hope never to read one of his books again.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars First, take a deep breath................................., 17 Feb. 2007
When my mother told me about this book that my sister was reading my immediate reaction was that it was the same story as the Holy Blood and the Holy Grail written by Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh and Henry Lincoln, a book I had first read after seeing it presented on a BBC Horizons programme when it school. Knowing the story to be interesting and presented as a historical argument in that book, if not one that stands up to scrutiny, I was amazed at the hype generated by Dan Brown's book.

I liked Angels and Demons, a much better book in my opinion, and Robert Langdon as an intelligent if slightly unbelievable hero and did enjoy the story of The Da Vinci code though found the pace somewhat difficult. There is literally no time to think during the course of the book and for those who enjoy thoughtful books this will be a real disappointment. The fact that the book is too fast-paced is reinforced by the film which must be impossible to follow if you have not read the book.

Overall, the book is an entertaining read and one that should be read in that spirit. There is too much inaccuracy to have justified the worldwide interest generated and the premises have been disproved previously, most notably the hoax around the Priory of Sion. The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail brings more mystery into the story and would be a better read than The Da Vinci code if you did want to follow up on the origins of the fiction.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Cryptex!, 17 Feb. 2005
By A Customer
The Da Vinci Code is a disappointing reading experience. Although I agree with many other reviewers regarding the writing style, as pure entertainment, some of the discussions of myths, legends and theories are interesting. However, the pay-off is a major let-down (I was expecting some great conspiracy)and the book becomes increasingly annoying because of the constant plot summaries and lines like: 'He looked at police cryptologist Sophie Neveau...' that occur hundreds of pages into the book (I know who she is!). Also, the villains are not exactly terrifying either. However, as train reading, the book skips along and there is much hilarity to be found (check out the dialogue of the 'alter boy' and the Helios Demos stuff). And if you do find yourself getting bored, you can always count how many times Brown can get the word 'cryptex' onto a single page.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Foucault's Pendulum for dummies..., 12 July 2004
...which isn't such a bad thing, really. It covers similar ground (approximately) but lacks the others depth, genius and complexity (and it's glorious final twist). What the Da Vinci Code does offer, however, is a great fun fast occult conspiracy thriller, with engaging characters, smart action and a good easy reading style. Take everything it contains with a fistful of salt, however - Mr Brown doesn't do a very good job of deliniating fact from fiction, tending to blur real and fictional figures easily. The most annoying point of the novel occurs right at the beggining, oddly, when he presents a page of "facts" outside the fiction to validate his work - but at least one of them is discredited beyond being taken seriously. In the end, this book isn't half as deep, philosophical or revolutionary as it thinks it is is - but as a good fun holiday read its worth a look. And regarding Mr Brown's supposed great historical research, most of it seems cribbed from one or two sensationalist books (Holy Blood Holy Grail, for example) - most of the mythology and legend I was already familiar with and I'm certainly not a world famous symbologist....
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The temptation of the Da Vinci Code, 16 Jan. 2006
By 
Lubbna Iqbal (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
I have to say I resisted the temptation for a while to get a copy of the Da Vinci Code but eventually curiosity got the better of me and I picked up a copy in the supermarked. I have to say that I was hooked from the first page. I thought it was all hype and publicity not to mention the 'blasphemous' content. However, it is fiction at its very best.
The book centres on academic Robert Langdon and a cryptologist, Sophie Neveu's attempts to get to the heart of the secret of the holy grail. The book follows them through the death of her grandfather at the Louvre in Paris, to London, England and finally to Scotland. Dan Brown brings the characters to life in his novel and by the end, you feel like you know Langdon and Neveu quite well so much so that you can assume what they will say and what their reactions are to certain situations.
They pick up enemies on the way including the ghostly Silas who is shadowy creature with an obsession.
In the end, one ends up learning more about Christianity than not. Opus Dei, the Catholic organisation based in New York is given acres of publicity which can't be bad for a book that set out to give an alternative to the Christian story we all know.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars OK but others are better, 10 Nov. 2005
I'd not ready any of Dan's work prior to this. I guess I'd been swept along by the media frenzy and popularity of the book, so decided to give it a go.
From the moment I opened the book I was certainly gripped and within a few pages it was so easy to see the book as a typical Hollywood film - in glorious colour and subtle lighting. Visually it's certainly a powerful book - in some respects Hemmingway had it right - less is more, when it comes to description.
It's certainly a great read and a great story and I have to confess since reading this I have gone on to read all three (it's now November 2005) of his other works; I've thoroughly enjoyed them all - even though they can be a little too far fetched in places!
Here's the "however" though. It is a good story, but I did feel it starts to "pitter" out towards the end. I know the film is in making and I have to say I'm not too sure what the film director is going to add to it, because Dan's style of writing has meant much of the "set" has been made, lit, painted and created for him.
Overall, a good book for entertainment. Unputdownable? Certainly on occassions, but not so much towards the end.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A Disappointing Read, 2 Aug. 2008
By 
Mrs. L. F. Hilton "Linda Hilton" (St. Bees, England) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: The Da Vinci Code (Paperback)
I've just finished reading the Da Vinci Code. Everyone persuaded me to read it but I found it extremely disappointing. It started out OK but it soon became bogged down in fictional trivia, plus it had so many "puzzles" to solve I felt like I was 10 years old and back at school on some sort of paper chase - it became boring! And because its pace almost slowed to a halt, I nearly dozed off several times trying to finish it, after which I wanted to toss it out of the window! Dan Brown also Americanised this novel - and they're suckers for "happy" endings - but I'm sorry, why would a stranger than fiction family reunion and a subtle hint of romance between the two main characters towards the end suddenly stop all that greed for world power, high Church corruption, hired hit men, killing and mayhem? Did all the baddies suddenly evaporate by a kiss and a promise of a nice little holiday in Florence??? Give a break!! Dan liked to play the teacher in this novel but as a woman I really didn't appreciate being patronised by the wide-eyed little girl scenario where Sophie had to suffer (and me with her) being "taught" not only by her Grandfather but then by 2 other self-satisfied men professing to hold all the knowledge and all the answers - while Sophie batted her eyelashes - but wasn't Sophie cleverer than all the men put together? Sorry Dan. I won't be wasting time reading any of your other novels, but I'm sure you'll still be happy laughing at us all the way to the bank.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A thriller permeated with quasi_knowledge., 18 Mar. 2013
I got the book some time ago when it was still a rather unknown item. I took it as a fictional thriller with absolutely no connections to the real world. Nevertheless, along the reading you notice the resolute affirmations about Christianity in the fabric of the book both factual and historical. But of course all this is quasi-knowledge. All the so called "facts" are fabricated to fit the plot of the story. Very cleverly and professionally done by Brown that by now has become an specialist in this kind of disinformation that unfortunately is so effective that some people have begun to address it as common knowledge as if it was part of an Encyclopedia. I have even witness TV commentators that quote the "Da Vinci Code" when they are speaking about religious issues. The main problem here is that after the enormous popularity of this book (the film was very bad indeed) other books both by Brown and other authors followed and will still follow which in their endeavor are permeated with this quasi-knowledge that sells so good. Perhaps just to be fair we should classify these as fantasy or sci-fi or even create a new classification f.e.: pseudo-historical.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


Most Helpful First | Newest First

This product

The Da Vinci Code:  Special Illustrated Collector's Edition: The Illustrated Edition
Used & New from: £0.01
Add to wishlist See buying options
Only search this product's reviews