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116 of 126 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Abridged
Very enjoyable. However it should be noted that this is an abridged version. It dosen't tell you that in the details.
Published on 18 Mar 2005 by G. Palmer

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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Agonising
This is a foetid mess of a book spewed by accident from the substandard brain of one Dan Brown. It is possible that the following review contains spoilers, although since the book has already been thoroughly spoiled in the writing process it's hard to see how I could make it worse.

Essentially, the lead character, Robert Langdon, is a symbolologist who is...
Published 9 months ago by Hedgehogbutty


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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I couldn't put this book down, 19 Dec 2007
I couldn't put this book down. Every page was an education and the details and description flowed thick and fast. As a convent educated female, I saw the catholic system up close and remained an athiest throughout. I was intrigued and delighted by some of the theories which only went to support much of what I suspected all along but without the education to support it.
That aside, truth or fiction it was very compelleing and I couldn't put it down, although it's BOUND to upset anyone with a religious bent as it questions the foundations of christianity - which is fine by me!

I liked the refreshing way that it challenges the fixed conceptions and offers different scenarios as to how things came to be, which are every bit as likely as what we are fed as the truth in daily life!! I'd also recommend reading the mesmerising and highly evocative novel The Fates by Tino Georgiou.
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1 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I cant believe some people did not enjoy it!!, 22 July 2004
By 
D Ganeson (Crawley, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
I feel that The Da Vinci Code is without a doubt the best book I have ever read. As for people who feel it is beneath them, they should check out 'Advances in Molecular Vibrations and Collision Dynamics: Vol 1 Part A' which I am sure would cater to their interests. I recommend this book to anyone who is looking for new books to read as you would be hooked to Dan Browns writing style which is a case study for suspense.
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1 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I liked this book, 23 Jun 2005
I always liked the book of Sherlock Holmes, but after I had read this book, I thought better of it! What I liked the most is Sir Leigh Teabing, a brilliant man one would like to make friendship with. I liked also the puzzles of the curator, a puzzle after puzzle that really makes one's head turn.
Whatever, if you like Agatha's books, you will certainly like this. It's built on a similar base, yet more brilliant.
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2 of 13 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 20 Jun 2005
The Da Vinci Code is a book and it is one unlike the many others that seem to fail in recent times that captivates and thrills so much that it leaves you with an overwhelming feeling of achievement when it's done. It has a fantastic plot that in this day and age intrigues no end. It is fascinating stuff learning about opus dei and 'corporal mortification' or that the holy grail may actually be Mary Magdalene's skeleton. So still unlike other novels it is educational too. Honestly you won't find a better book this year than Dan Brown's ultimate best-selling thriller The Da Vinci Code.
Oh and as for the guys who think there is a flaw in character depth, I think this is totally irrelevant in terms of what the author wanted to achieve.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good book, 15 Feb 2005
Good book but a really cool book is The System by Roy Valentine. I read them both at the same time so it's hard to not compare them.
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5 of 24 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Playing ball with the Devil., 2 Aug 2003
This review is from: The Da Vinci Code (Hardcover)
So the Priory of Sion was helmed throughout history by all the great artists of the day? Then suddenly post-WWII we get Pope John XXIII and ... Pierre de Plantard de Sinclair running things? Am I really supposed to believe this? If the artists listed as being grand masters of Sion have Gnostic symbols and signs in their work... it's simply because all great art has some form of gnostic metaphor in it. It comes with the territory: Man's quest for his identity. And great artists have been educated, understand and have experienced what this quest means. Although I don't see Van Gogh listed as a grand master of Sion, yet he is certainly a Grand Master of the gnostic and mystical artform!
This book is just Masonic propaganda run amok!
The fact is the Priory of Sion, whatever form it actually takes within the European Royal Houses, the Vatican, and its trans-Masonic 33rd degree Scottish Rite off-shoots, is not dedicated to TRUE Gnosticism and the Arts, but to a FEUDAL world vision and the return to direct power of their elite bloodlines. (Does the word crypto-Nazi spring to mind?)
Rosicrucianism is their ideology - a quasi-alchemical sex magic and occult driven form of extreme and reactionary white supremacy and genetic elitism.
As regards Opus Dei being the villains? They're all birds of a feather, and at some point, they all hang together: Politically, economically, ideologically, and ritually. Sion, Opus Dei, Knights Templar, P2 neo-Nazis, Knights of Malta... they all drink from the same well in terms of their perception of their own LIES of History (whether mainstream lies or secret lies), of their own supremacy, and their warped plans for the future of the world and the human race.
Dan Brown has got it horribly wrong. And judging by this book, he may well be another Synarchistic propagandist following in the footsteps of their current patron saint: Sir Laurence Gardner and his insane crypto-fascist quasi-Satanic ramblings that somehow manage to get mainstream publication.
Who do you think actually wrote the "Protocols of Zion"? Or in Merovingian: "Les Protocols de SION", that ignited anti-Semetism and led to the Holocaust... the historically persecuted Jews of Europe? Or the above-mentioned and Dan Brown-idolized Priory of SION?
Come on Umberto, better write a review before the Black Shirts take control of the Pendulum once again.
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0 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best book i ever read, 30 Dec 2007
By 
C. Butt (Sydney) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is a fantastic book which is impossible to put down. Ten times better than the film, its impossible not to be obsessed with
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Parisa's Review, 29 Aug 2005
By 
Parisa "Parisa" (Guisborough Cleveland) - See all my reviews
A fantastically written book which, for me, was impossible to put down! The book is a non-stop adventure and search for truth which has many twists and surprises.
Paticular chapters in the book have made me see religon in a different sense. Since reading the da vinci code (in 8 hours!!) I have seen a famous da vinci picture, which I have seen thousands of times previously, in a brand new light! This is an exceptionally written book and a fantastic thriller from start to finish!
Parisa Diba
14
England
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Fastest Passed Thriller EVER, 1 Nov 2004
By A Customer
I read this book whilst on holiday, and to be honest it gripped me from the begining to end(of the holiday). It is an amazingly fast passed thriller with twists and turns everywhere, gripping you from the first page to last. It is writen in such away it is amazingly wity and interlectul. Whilst having slightly far-feteched and a very strong storyline, I honestly put the book down asking myself questions.
I reccomend this book to anyone willing to give a great book a go.
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0 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Good Read, couldn't put the book down!, 24 May 2005
By 
C. Harnett "welshcaroline" (Cardiff) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
A really good book, well written and each chapter just left you wanting to carry on reading more (it took me 24hrs to read!). The book was insightful and thought provoking. What is faith unless somethimes it is questioned. I beleive some other reviews here are harsh; Its key to remember that the book is classed as fictional and doesn't claim to be a lonely planet for Paris! Read this book and enjoy.
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