Shop now Shop now Shop All Amazon Fashion Up to 70% off Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop Amazon Fire TV Shop now Shop Fire HD 6 Shop Kindle Voyage Shop now Shop Now Shop now

Customer Reviews

17
4.2 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

32 of 33 people found the following review helpful
on 19 February 2004
I am currently studying this for a-level and this book has been a great help. It contains many features and a break down of how to study a poem and analysises each poem, with three extended commentaries on 'toads revisted', 'ambulances' and 'here'. This study guide also gives relevant and important background information on Larkin. I found this book to be really helpful in particular its analysis of each poem and has really helped with my course. I would definetly recommend this book to others!
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 30 October 2009
This book is very useful for students studying 'the whitsun weddings' for a-level like myself. It gives you lots of different ideas and interpretations that you or your teachers may not have have thought about. It also helps your understanding of some of the more difficult poems. However, it is held back by the fact that it does not cover all of the poems in the collection, although it doesn't miss out any of the 'major' poems. The information on themes and other background information is very helpful as well.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 2 November 2010
Although this publication doesn't contain all the Larkin poems in the AQA A-level Literature anthology, it is still a useful study-aid and revision tool for students and teachers of A-level poetry. As with all modern York Notes it is clearly and attractively designed with a wealth of relevant information separated into appropriate sections. A must-buy for students of Larkin but be aware it might not have all the poems you need.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 12 January 2012
(Currently doing A-Level studies on The Whitsun Weddings)

The book is rather short and doesn't really go into enough detail in the poems. Most of the comments being made are ones that the reader most likely could come to by themselves.

The book is good enough just to recap on the poems and to get the 'jist' of the poems, But I wouldn't recommend this for those who are die hard students.

My teacher and school hand out notes are much better than the book.

If its cheap, Purchase. If its expensive, Don't bother.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 28 March 2011
The book is really useful and does provide a lot of information about the poems. However I didn't realise when I bought it that it didn't have the whole whitsun weddings collection. It was mentioned in other review but since I was using a different specification I thought I would be ok. turns out it doesn't have every poem in the whitsun weddings book. It does have most, however but you may want to consider buying the study guide as well.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 5 December 2014
I think that this book is actually really useful for a broad knowledge of all the poems in the selection, eg for an exam. However as I am only focusing on one of the poems for my coursework it does not go into quite enough depth to be of any real use.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
My introduction to Philip Larkin and his collection of verse, 'The Whitsun Weddings' I owe to my friend David Evennett, at that time Member of Parliament for Erith and Crayford (now MP for another area). Back when I was researcher for a Member of Parliament, I had an avocation as a poet. David discovered this, and recommended Larkin as a poetic voice worthy of attention. (His researcher acted surprised, blurting out loud much to our amusement, 'And here I always took you for a Philistine!') I have been grateful ever since, as I frequently return to this slim volume of verse for inspiration and reflection.
This volume of poetry includes 32 poems of the original 'Whitsun Weddings' collection, plus some others. 'Whitsun Weddings' was a small book first published in 1964, which has proven so popular (something rare in poetry circles) that it has been reprinted four times during the 1970s, four times during the 1980s, and continues to be reprinted periodically up to the present day.
John Betjeman, one-time poet laureate of England, once commented of Larkin that 'this tenderly observant poet writes clearly, rhythmically, and thoughtfully about what all of us can understand.' This is the key to Larkin's verse -- accessibility. There are no obvious poetical devices that overpower the meaning or the language; there are no forced schemes, however brilliantly executed, that impose themselves on the reader. The gentle rhythms carry the reader like a slow-moving train on a well-cushioned track.
The poem 'Mr. Bleaney' is the one David first drew attention to when I brought in the small book a few days after his recommendation.
But if he stood and watched the frigid wind
Tousling the clouds, lay on the fusty bed
Telling himself that this was home, and grinned,
And shivered, without shaking off the dread
That how we live measures our own nature,
And at his age having no more to show
Than one hired box should make him pretty sure
He warranted no better, I don't know.
These words resonate with me at different times in my life, as they did with David. There is a desire to make someone of oneself, to have something to show for one's life. In the development of Mr. Bleaney's life, and his successor in the rented room, one can take stock and reappraise one's own life. What is the value, and how is it calculated?
Larkin's poetry frequently turns to the matter of religion and spirituality, without getting overly fussy or remote. In the poem Water, Larkin gives a very brief description of a spirit-freeing and pluralistic yet communal experience.
Larkin addresses the issues of age and youth, of love and loneliness, of despair and hope, all within the space of these 32 wonderful poems. The poem `Wild Oats' incorporates all of these themes in one compact, bittersweet tale of life. Who could fail to wonder at the matter-of-fact and poignant description of the man who couldn't commit to one woman, having met only briefly her more beautiful friend, and seven years later is still unable to forget? The poem 'A Study of Reading Habits' likewise, dealing with dreams conjured up through reading during youth gone the way of reality in middle age, ending with a too-familiar sour-grapes feeling, 'Books are a load of crap'.
Of course, I mustn't neglect the title piece, 'The Whitsun Weddings'. Perfectly capturing mood and manner of weddings, the routine and the cycle of life, Larkin in fact uses the image of travelling by rail as a subtle motif for the journey through life, the Whitsun Weddings being a stop through which many (a dozen couples in this poem) proceed on their way to lives that will be lived out in 'London spread out like the sun / Its postal districts packed like squares of wheat.'
Larkin's final word in this collection is a very worthy word -- one that will preach, in the words of a cleric friend of mine -- and one that brings to very sweet encapsulation his image of the Arundel Tomb, carefully and tenderly drawn for us in words, evoking images of when it was first created to how it is perceived today in its state of weathered testimony of the couple buried together:
Their final blazon, and to prove
Our almost-instinct almost true:
What will survive of us is love.
May these poems survive.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 18 January 2013
The most perfect guide for people studying Philip Larkins poems. The guide is detailed where it counts and not in a boring way and covers almost everything I wondered about. Definitely recommend to other students
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 27 April 2013
A useful book if studying the text with detailed notes on each poem, although it is very thick language to read. A basic knowledge of the poems already would be useful before reading.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on 8 September 2013
Excellent set of Advanced Level notes. Very helpful in the understanding of the poems at this level. Would recommend to you.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
The Whitsun Weddings (Faber Poetry)
The Whitsun Weddings (Faber Poetry) by Philip Larkin (Paperback - 8 May 2001)
£9.98

Mean Time
Mean Time by Carol Ann Duffy (Paperback - 23 May 2013)
£7.49

Welsh Retrospective
Welsh Retrospective by Dannie Abse (Paperback - 28 Jan. 2014)
£8.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.