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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic adrenaline filled book
I actually read this months ago and just haven't got around to writing the review *am dreadful*. I managed to pick up a copy shortly after finishing The Forest of Hands and Teeth in the library. I walked in for a browse, was just about to leave with nothing when I turned to find the book staring at me from a display stand. How excited was I. I never expected the library...
Published on 21 Jan. 2011 by Emma @ Book Angel Booktopia

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3.0 out of 5 stars Deja zombie vu
Gabry lives with her mother, Mary, in a lighthouse in the town of Vista. Together they watch for the Mudo who wash up on the beach, killing them before they can attack the townsfolk. Gabry seems content with life, but the truth is that she's terrified of the world outside Vista, terrified of the Mudo, and terrified of taking risks.

Gabry's best friend Cira...
Published on 3 Nov. 2011 by I Read, Therefore I Blog


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic adrenaline filled book, 21 Jan. 2011
By 
Emma @ Book Angel Booktopia (Wales) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Hardcover)
I actually read this months ago and just haven't got around to writing the review *am dreadful*. I managed to pick up a copy shortly after finishing The Forest of Hands and Teeth in the library. I walked in for a browse, was just about to leave with nothing when I turned to find the book staring at me from a display stand. How excited was I. I never expected the library to have it the week it was published, you can imagine my excitement and seeing the library stamp go on that shiny new page *bliss*.

This time the book is written from the perspective of Gabry. Gabry is roughly the same age as Mary was in TFHT but a completely different personality altogether. She doesn't crave freedom from the barriers that surround the village in order to keep the 'mudo' out. Comparatively, she views them as a symbol of security, something which she embraces fully. All she wants from life is to feel safe. As the book progressed we discover the relationship between Gabry and Mary; I found myself comparing them finding they both had very selfish/self-centred traits, not thinking how their actions would affect others. I tried to put myself in their position to imagine how I would act, I wasn't successful.

She regards the other teenagers in her village with incredulity, finding their need to put themselves in danger in order to have fun as idiotic. She feels that they take their safety for granted. Of course, she is proved right.

Images of the movie I Am Legend kept running through my head with the comparison in the plot.

The storyline is dramatic, even shocking in parts; tying together the first book with the sequel seamlessly. There is no getting away from the fact that you have to read this series in order or you wont understand the intricacies of the plot. The descriptions are dynamic and sensory; I had the feeling I could feel/smell/touch/taste/hear all of the action (not necessarily a good thing when talking about zombies, lol). I was totally immersed in the narrative. At times my body would go rigid with the tension emanating from the pages. The tension was palpable making my heart race, I even held my breath in parts. My stomach literally flipped at the 'soulers' ceremony.

There are ingenious parallels within the narrative. The idea that nowhere is safe and maybe they should return to the forest (its the ocean every-time for me). Also the parallel imagery conjured by the description of Mary and Gabry in the waves compared to the photograph of Mary's Grandmother and Mother was inspired.

I particularly liked the philosophical debate between Elias and Gabry with regard to the soul and life after death. Including the retention of our memories and feelings. What happens to our memories when we die? \Do we carry them with us onto another life/ Do they no longer exist/ Or do they live on through others? The interpretation we can gain from this debate in relation to the 'mudo' is that the body is a vessel, upon death the soul leaves the body. the soul being the essence of who we are. Therefore, the 'mudo' are just empty (very scary, flesh eating) vessels that once contained a soul.

The inclusion of Shakespeare sonnets was brilliant, the death imagery was open to interpretation depending on the situation. Genius.

Overall a fantastic adrenaline filled book. I have to admit that at the time of reading this it had not been announced that there was to be a third book. Immediately upon finishing the book, I emailed Carrie Ryan asking if there was to be a third book. It was a compulsive need to have resolution of all aspects of the plot. I will be honest and I am a big fan of happy ending. Is there a chance that we could get a happy ending in a zombie apocalypse???
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Courtesy of Teens Read Too, 10 Mar. 2010
By 
TeensReadToo "Eat. Drink. Read. Be Merrier." (All Over the US & Canada) - See all my reviews
(TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
Gabry has lived with her mother in the lighthouse for years. She is content with her friends, her quiet world, and dreaming of life in the Dark City where people enjoy more comforts than she is used to.

Gabry's friends are more adventurous than she is. They like to sneak out of town and explore the unsafe areas where Mudo roam. They particular enjoy going to the abandoned and dangerous amusement park on the other side of the fence. Gabry doesn't want to go where the Mudo wander - she wants to stay safe, but Catcher is going and she wants to be with him. The thought of spending time with Catcher alone and in the dark overpowers her thoughts of safety.

Gabry's trip to the amusement part quickly turns into a disaster. She is forced to grow up fast with very little information. The little she learns from her mother sends her on the biggest adventure of her life. One she never even considered a possibility. The only thing that keeps her going is the desire to learn the truth about her family and save the people she loves.

My first reaction when I started reading THE DEAD-TOSSED WAVES was disappointment. I wanted more about Mary. Also, there were several times when Gabry got on my nerves.

But, after thinking about the book for a while, I have come to the conclusion that continuing the story of the people surviving life among the Unconsecrated/Mudo several years after THE FOREST OF HANDS AND TEETH was okay. How much more could we have seen Mary do? She'd already survived the trip through the forest and found the ocean. What could she do that was more exciting than that? Plus, Gabry provides a whole new perspective on life after the Return.

I now can't wait to read the third novel in this wonderful series. Keep up the good work, Ms. Ryan.

Reviewed by: Karin Librarian
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I LOVE THIS SERIES, 19 Aug. 2010
This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Hardcover)
If I had too choose a Fave out of the 2 books The Forest of Hands and Teeth and The Dead Tossed Waves I would have to say The Dead Tossed Waves wins hands down.....Its more of a companion novel then a sequel to TFOHAT, we still have a few characters in it that are in The Forest of Hands and Teeth but the overall point of the characters are to see it from the next generation point of view.

I personally feel that Carrie's writes with passion her characters and the location are well thought out and suited the novel perfectly. I found myself in love with so many of the characters and I was in aww with how much my emotions changed the more I read! TDTW is a gripping and spell binding read that kept me engaged from beginning to end...I can not wait until the next book especially as TDTW ended with the need for me to read more and its a dying rage that I have to wait!!

I seriously recommend this series if you haven't already read it!
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4.0 out of 5 stars This is a story of zombies and love., 30 Aug. 2012
By 
This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Paperback)
(I received a digital copy of this book for free on a read-to-review basis. Thanks to books4reviews.)
This is the second book in the `Forest of Hands and Teeth' series.
Gabrielle (or Gabry) is a teenager. She's lived her entire life in a lighthouse, surrounded on 3 sides by water and on 1 side by the forest. Her mother is very different to the other people that live in the village, she claims to have been born and raised in a village in the forest of hands and teeth, a story that the people of the village reject as delusional. The reader knows this to be true though as Gabrielle's mother is Mary - the main character from book 1 - `The Forest of Hands and Teeth'.

Gabrielle's world is a little different to Mary's in book 1, Gabrielle and her friends have only ever really heard about the Mudo (or unconsecrated) at school, and haven't had the real-life experiences that Mary had. Gabrielle has always been taught to fear what lies beyond the fence though, and the thought of her friends going over the wall to visit the old roller coaster makes her feel sick.

Her best friend Cira, and Cira's brother Catcher are both going though, and when it seems like Catcher might return her secret feelings for him, Gabrielle allows herself to go along with their plan, and follows them over the way and to the amusement park.

Gabrielle's world is soon turned upside down though when a `breaker' (a newly turned unconsecrated that is `fast' and can run), bites one of her friends, and then goes after the rest of the group. Gabrielle is saved by Catcher, but he is bitten during the scuffle, and Gabrielle sees her life crumbling before her very eyes.

Gabrielle runs, but the others are caught by the `Militia' (the men who guard the fence). Those that are bitten are killed, and those that aren't are imprisoned to await their punishment. Catcher is missing though, and when Cira begs Gabrielle to go back into the forest and look for him, Gabrielle knows that her life will never be the same again.

I really enjoyed this book. I wasn't sure where the author was going to go after `The Forest of Hands and Teeth' and I was surprised to find that so much time had passed between book 1 and book 2, and that we now had a different lead character.
Gabry is not a brave girl; in fact she's scared of entering the forest, and wants to stay safe within the fences of the village where she knows it is safe. Like many teenagers though she is swayed by the boy she has feelings for, and follows her friends into the forest. She soon realises what a mistake this is, and wishes that she could go back in time and change things.
We don't hear much from Mary initially, although we do get some revelations from her later on in the story. I wondered initially who Gabrielle's father was, but it turned out to be a much more complicated situation that I could have imagined, and I wondered exactly how much time had passed between the end of the first book and the start of the second.

Similarly to the first book we have a sort-of love triangle situation going on. In the first book this was quite a complicated affair between Mary, her best friend Cass, and the brother's Travis and Harry, and in this book it's between Gabrielle, Catcher, and a boy called Elias who comes to Gabrielle's rescue when she goes back outside the village looking for Catcher. Once again though things are never simple, and when not running for her life, Gabrielle agonises over her feelings for the two boys.

I felt really sorry for Gabrielle throughout this book, she just has so much thrown at her, and everything she has ever wanted or loved seems to be taken away from her, even if this was in part due to poor decisions on her part. First she has to deal with friends being infected, dying, or being locked away to await punishment. Then she learns things about herself and her family that she never knew before which leaves her unsure of who she even is anymore, and then there's even worse to come! Poor Gabry really does go through an awful lot in this story, and you can't help but feel for her.

I did feel that the story slowed down quite a bit in the middle, and even dragged a bit at points, which is why this wasn't a 5 star book for me. Things did pick up again towards the end though, for a gripping finish, although we were left with a bit of a cliff hanger. I have to say that I'm intruiged to find out what will happen in book 3, although I hate to think how things could possibly get worse for Gabry and co. in this hell-ish zombie-filled wastleland.
8.5 out of 10.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Lost a little sparkle but I loved it anyway!, 6 May 2012
By 
Amazon Customer (United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Paperback)
The sequel to the fantastic "The Forest of Hands and Teeth" had a lot to live up to in my opinion. Mary's story in the first novel was so beautifully told in my opinion that the moment I finished I went straight out to buy this one with high hopes that it would be just as good. Surprisingly though this time around it isn't really about Mary anymore; she features but she's much older. Infact this time the story is told from "Gabry's" perspective - Mary's daughter.

You might think then that this is just going to be Mary and Gabry living their lives in the village she stumbled across at the end of the last book but within the first two chapters the action kicks in and we're sent back into the hungry world of the forest of hands and teeth. At first I was a little disappointed, I thought that all the secrets and questions I had about Mary, Harry, Cass and Jacob would be forgotten because Gabry was the protagonist but in actuality Gabry is forced to uncover a lot of secrets about Mary, her mothers friends and herself.

There's just as much tension and action this time around and Gabry is a really likeable character - something that was an improvement for me because I felt Mary was a bit restless in the previous book and found her a bit frustrating at times (I liked her a lot more in this one). I particularly liked that Mary had instilled quite a bit of fear into Gabry, perhaps accidentally, and this made Gabry interesting. She isn't the typical drippy girl but she does get frightened quite a bit (understandable given her predicament in the book). The new characters we're introduced to, and the new love triangle no less, are great - they're all likeable and memorable which I find rare in new characters; sometimes their names all roll into one if the development is poor.

Did I like it as much as its companion? No, I probably didn't. The reason for this is that towards the end I felt it lost its way a little. The beginning was exciting, tense and a few questions were answered and drip fed to us but towards the end it felt like a bit of repeat of the previous novel and I found myself a little bored. Despite this though I did eventually get back into the swing of it, I just felt it lost a bit of the excitement and anticipation that it started off with. Additionally, I'm really excited to see what will happen next. I wouldn't say its much of a cliffhanger but I'm interested to see where it will go from here - I'm just not rushing out to buy the next one as quickly as I did for this one.

Overall, I still thought it was great and Carrie Ryan has created a world I really love to read about - I just hope it stays good in the final installment. Hope this helps.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Deja zombie vu, 3 Nov. 2011
This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Paperback)
Gabry lives with her mother, Mary, in a lighthouse in the town of Vista. Together they watch for the Mudo who wash up on the beach, killing them before they can attack the townsfolk. Gabry seems content with life, but the truth is that she's terrified of the world outside Vista, terrified of the Mudo, and terrified of taking risks.

Gabry's best friend Cira invites her to join a group of teenagers in jumping over the fence around Vista and visit an abandoned funfair. Climbing the fence is punishable by banishment, but Gabry agrees because Cira's brother Catcher is going. The evening's initially perfect as Catcher admits that he loves her. Then the Mudo attack. Within minutes most of Gabry's friends, including Catcher, are dead or infected. Apart from Gabry all those who escape are caught by the Milita.

Terrified that the Militia will find out she was there, she learns that the infected Catcher has not yet turned into Mudo and resolves to find him. Her search brings her into contact with Elias, a boy with secrets of his own. Catcher, Elias, Gabry and Cira must flee into the Forest of Hands and Teeth, where they learn about Mary's past, which will affect Gabry's future ...

Carrie Ryan's sequel to THE FOREST OF HANDS AND TEETH is essentially a companion novel. Although Mary appears in this book, it's very much Gabry's story and the details you get on Mary's life are cursory.

I enjoyed the expanded world building, particularly the references to the Dark City, which requires villages to send it people to be trained as Recruiters. There are also some stunning set pieces - particularly towards the end where there's a nail-biting escape involving a ravine filled with Mudo.

The big problem though is that it all felt like too much of a rehash of THE FOREST OF HANDS AND TEETH. Again, there's a central love triangle with Gabry waffling in her feelings between Elias and Catcher in a way that never really convinced. Even the journey through the Forest is a replay of Mary's earlier adventure, including a visit to places from the earlier book. Ultimately though, Gabry's fears and indecision mean that she reacts to situations rather than controlling them, which makes her dull.

The book ends with a set up for a sequel, which I'll read in the hope of learning more about the Dark City.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Better Than It's Prequel, 28 Oct. 2010
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This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Hardcover)
I read "The Dead Tossed Waves", and ended up really liking it. The plot is a lot more organised than the plot in TFOHAT, as I felt that there was a lot more thought put into the pacing and the timeline. As in the first novel, the zombies - or "Mudo" - in this book are still my favourite part. The whole story about The Return is very interesting, and I honestly felt really connected with the story because the zombies were so realistic.

The love triangle aspect of the story is another similarity to the previous novel. Gabry struggles with her feelings for her childhood friend, Catcher, and her new, mysterious friend Elias, and a lot of the novel is based around these three people, and Gabry trying to figure out which one she should give up. I didn't think there was much need for a love triangle in this book. A lot of authors seem to love the triangles at the moment, and I admit, sometimes they can be very interesting. However, I do not think that this love triangle did anything for the overall story. Catcher could just have easily been a good friend to Gabry, rather than a love interest.

I loved Gabry as a character. She was a lot more easy to connect with than her mother, Mary, as she is quite rightly frightened of the world outside the walls of her town. She shows fear of the Mudo and I find this to be one of her greater qualities. She's scared, and yet she still ventures out of the town to look after her friend and to find her mother.

I also really liked Elias, who was an interesting asset to the story. However, I did not particularly like Catcher. His own story was interesting, and the twist was a nice touch but when teamed with Gabry's, I did not find him interesting at all, and very two dimensional.

Mary was the same, selfish little girl that she was in the first book. So much for my expectations of her growing up after the demise of her friends and family!

Overall, I did like this book and the ending was a great lead up to the next book in the series "The Dark and Hollow Places"
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5.0 out of 5 stars The Dead-Tossed Waves (contains spoilers from the forest of hands and teeth), 16 Sept. 2010
This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Hardcover)
I had loved 'the forest of hands and teeth' - reading it in one day because I couldn't stop reading - My teachers threatened to have it confiscated! The first book was about Mary's escape from her village and her desperate struggle to reach the ocean.

This book is set in the future, about Mary and her daughter, Gabrielle (who is named after 'the red one' - the girl who had come from beyond the barrier. I was relieved at this, because I hadn't been ready to let go of Mary at the end of the first book. Gabry and her mother live in the lighthouse, mentioned at the end of the forest of hands and teeth. Gabry knows the rules, but she and friends went behind the barrier anyway.

Gabry managed to escape, but her friends weren't so lucky. They were sentenced to join the recruiters, people who hunt down the mudo. 'Mudo' is the word that the characters in this book - except for Mary, who still calls them 'the Unconsecrated' - call the zombies. 'Mudo' means 'mute, speechless' though Gabry describes them as being loud, because of their horrible moans.

Mary, now much older than the child she was, asks Gabry if she was with her friends that night. When Gabry lies, she thinks her mother is disappointed in her, because Mary had always been so brave and strong. It's an interesting contrast, between these two females, both related and who use the first person. You see Gabry as someone who is scared and naive, whereas Mary battled for someone she believes in. The two couldn't be more different.

I don't want to give away any more, as you really should read the book, it's brilliant. This one ends differently to the last one, as it's a cliffhanger, meant for a third book - which is supposedly in a different point of view, but you'll heard of this person in this book - so it kept me hungry for more. If you're the type of person who likes mystery and twists that have you saying, 'Oh my God!' then READ THIS BOOK.

Enjoy, I hope this was helpful :D
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4.0 out of 5 stars Second installment, 12 Aug. 2011
This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Paperback)
Gabry lives a quiet life that is as safe as possible in a town trapped between the forest and the see, with the unconsecrated roaming around. The unconsecrated constantly yearn and hunger for those that are living.
Gabry is content enough on her side of the barrier, happy to let her friends dream of the Dark city, which lies up the coast. Gabry watches from her lighthouse where she lives. However their are threats to the barrier. The very same threats that Gabry's mother thought she had left behind when she herself escaped from the sisterhood and The Forest of Hands and Teeth.
Suddenly everything changes, in one reckless moment half of Gabry's generation is dead, the other half is in prison.Gabry knows only one thing, she must face the Forest of her mother's past to save herself and the one she loves.

This is the second book in the series, and it is a faster read, in that things seem to move more quickly. This second book held my attention and curiosity as to what would happen much more than the first. In fact it makes you desperate to read the third installment to find out what happens to your favourite characters like Catcher,as well as what Gabry's fate is to be.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Twilight Wannabe (except with Zombies), 11 July 2012
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This review is from: The Dead-Tossed Waves (Paperback)
I read (and mostly enjoyed) The Forest of Hands and Teeth, finding it a pretty original take on the well-worn zombie genre. It's sequel - The Dead-Tossed Waves - is more of the same, except that Ryan's desire to cash in on the Twilight phenomenon is much more obvious. Both books are essentially coming-of-age/romance novels set in a zombie-infested world, with teenage girls narrating both stories. The emphasis is on the girls' emotional reflections on the world around them and the romantic entanglements they have with their fellow survivors, so it's a long way from your typical gore-filled zombie fare. The real problem with The Dead-Tossed Waves is the narrator - Gabry - and her Stephanie Myer-esque unfulfilled longing for every male she meets. She's selfish and whiney and seems to change her mind between two particular boys literally from one page to the next; make your mind up love! I'm guessing that I'm not the novel's target demographic, which is presumably teenage girls, who will probably have more empathy with Gabry and have loved Twilight and The Hunger Games. It's not a bad book, just a bit blatant in it's attempts to cash in on this market.
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