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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My 100-word book review
Set in a dystopian near future, Fairyland is filled with exotic and sinister technological wonders. Designer drugs, mind-altering viruses, savage "warewolves", personalities uploaded into virtual worlds. And, of course, there are the dolls, artificial beings created for humanity's amusement but which, like miniature Frankenstein monsters, become increasingly and...
Published on 27 Mar 2007 by A. J. Cull

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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Enjoyable Science Fantasy Loses It’s Way
For two-thirds of its length Fairyland is an enjoyable character-driven science fantasy, but unfortunately it falls at the final hurdle with an overly obscure and anticlimactic ending. The central idea seems to be an expansion of McAuley’s earlier short story ‘Karl and the Ogre’ (collected in The King of the Hill) with it’s setting of a seemingly...
Published on 31 Dec 2003 by Jane Aland


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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars My 100-word book review, 27 Mar 2007
By 
A. J. Cull (London, UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
Set in a dystopian near future, Fairyland is filled with exotic and sinister technological wonders. Designer drugs, mind-altering viruses, savage "warewolves", personalities uploaded into virtual worlds. And, of course, there are the dolls, artificial beings created for humanity's amusement but which, like miniature Frankenstein monsters, become increasingly and alarmingly independent. Fairyland suffers from being a novel in three parts, with separate casts of minor characters, and this makes it rather disjointed. But the firecracker display of ideas is exhilarating, Alex Sharkey is a refreshingly atypical hero and, despite dating from over a decade ago, this novel remains relevant and enjoyable.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Memorable Post-Cyberpunk Novel Set in a Wasted, Near Future Europe, 3 Aug 2012
By 
John Kwok (New York, NY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
"Fairyland" remains one of the most impressive works in post-cyberpunk fiction, conjuring a nightmarish vision of a near future Europe in which biotechnology has run amok, creating new species of humans designed for pleasure and violent sport. Paul J. McAuley's novel is a fast-paced thriller reminiscent of William Gibson and John Shirley's early cyberpunk novels in its pacing. Succumbing to the charm and vision of a megalomaniac brilliant young child, Milena, genetic engineer Alex Sharkey helps unleash a dire threat to humanity's existence, allowing "dolls" - bioengineered beings based on human DNA, designed for pleasure, slavery and wanton destruction in gladiator-like amusement games - the opportunity to think for themselves and understand the notion of free will. He will pursue these beings and other, similar, creatures across decades across a European landscape wasted by the ravages of war and poverty, searching for Milena and a means to ensure humanity's survival. Without question, "Fairyland" is still one of Paul J. McAuley's greatest works in fantasy and science fiction, demonstrating his great gifts in storytelling and writing.
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An Enjoyable Science Fantasy Loses It’s Way, 31 Dec 2003
By 
Jane Aland (England) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
For two-thirds of its length Fairyland is an enjoyable character-driven science fantasy, but unfortunately it falls at the final hurdle with an overly obscure and anticlimactic ending. The central idea seems to be an expansion of McAuley’s earlier short story ‘Karl and the Ogre’ (collected in The King of the Hill) with it’s setting of a seemingly fantastic landscape created out of technology. The story centres around the evolution of genetically engineered dolls into fairies – part one showing the creation of the first fairy, with part two dealing with an early colony set up in the remains of the old Disneyland Paris. Both of these are expertly paced as the sympathetic characters draw the reader deeper into the mystery of fairy ‘Queen’ Milena, and paint a disturbing picture of a world where nanotechnology is capable of changing people’s perception on a massive scale.
This is excellent stuff, but unfortunately it all falls apart with a confusing finale concerning Milena’s quest for immortality. This muddled and unclear ending ensures the novel ends on a low point, which is a shame for a novel that promised so much. Fairyland also suffers in comparison with Richard Calder’s Dead Girls – another novel that tackles the idea of engineered dolls gaining their freedom, only with a lot more style and emotion. Fairyland is patchy and rather staid in comparison, but this is still an interesting read for sf fans.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Alex in Nano-land: Cyber-opera and our cultural origins., 3 Aug 2001
This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
This book blew my mind. Without giving too much away.. it started like a detective novel, snaked its way through cyber-punk and blossomed into a treatise on the very nature of what it really means to be alive with our need for hopes, fears, symbols and myths.
In the not too distant future the boundaries blur between technology , mythology and magic. This is science fiction at its heady best and although somewhat slow to get into, I guarantee that by page 60 you'll never want to put it down. This book lives with you. Fabulous. If you enjoy it (and i know you will) also try Ice People by maggie gee and Child Garden by Geoff Ryman.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A sprawling synthesis of decadence, nanotech and wonder., 14 Feb 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
McAuley has added to the small set of books which add a new paradigm to SF. His atmospheric nanotech-dominated world, infused with the culture of global immersive web-space, drug-dealing and low-life, is suffused with a sense of wonder. You almost feel nostalgic for what is a horrifying preview of the supercession of decadent humankind by the gen-engineered "fairies". Definitely up there with Peter Hamilton, Greg Bear.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 2 July 2014
This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
very unusual story, interesting
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2.0 out of 5 stars A Bit Long And A Bit Ugly, 21 Jun 2014
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This review is from: Fairyland (Kindle Edition)
I'm not entirely sure why I didn't like it. A combination of length (much too long), a nasty premise (genenered "dolls" as servants- often used for sex), complexity (often hard to follow), hard to like (or care about) characters. It *is* clever and multi-layered and zips around a post modern world. The world (apart from the dolls) I almost like.

Read his other stuff- *that's* good
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4.0 out of 5 stars Skillful modern mythology, 28 Feb 2013
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Loose Bones (West Midlands, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fairyland (Kindle Edition)
A rich and strange world is conjured by this novel. Fairytale creatures and subjective points of view are created by quite plausible but roughly sketched genetic engineering, bioinformatics and nanotechnology innovations. It is populated with dark and nasty characters, and others who are ambiguous but subjected to extreme privations, a bit like those in The Quiet War. Through them you're only given flickering oblique snapshots of a grand narrative (the creation of Fairyland by greater powers, locked in their own struggles), whilst their own struggles form the page-turning plot. This makes for a complexity that can be rewarding, but also left black areas of misunderstanding and confusion for me.
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4.0 out of 5 stars Dystopic Biology 101, 19 Nov 2011
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This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
Clever dystopian sf heavy on the biology, well written characters, quite taunt plotting. Not probably a good idea if you already feeling suicidal; but for anyone else who's intreasted in genetic possibility, economic collapse and what are the rights of being human, well worth reading.
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Very Dark, Very Confusing, Very Good, 7 Dec 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Fairyland (Paperback)
An amazingly vivid and colourful read about the future, the dark imagery used for places you can imagine or even know really come to life in a decaying near future set up. The 3 Stories in one are very cleverly interlinked exploring the Birth, Rise and Fall of the free thinking slave robot's called Fairies or Fays. You shoot from London to Paris to Albania in a chase for knowledge and survival against the government and the corperations. I loved it, i will be reading more of his books.
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Fairyland
Fairyland by Paul McAuley (Paperback - 3 Sep 2009)
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