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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Future Human Immortals Roam the Milky Way!
This excellent novel has a short story prequel, unfortunately absent from this volume: 'The Thousandth Night'. It is available in Gardner Dozois One Million A.D. anthology. As for House of Suns, in my humble opinion, this is Reynolds' best novel to date. Future immortal clones of a person explore the Milky Way and meet to reconvene every 200,000 years. Reynolds has this...
Published on 9 Oct 2009 by Luc Andre Mandeville

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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read but lacking something at the end
This was my first time reading a book by Alastair Reynolds. I thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to reading more by him. Though I felt let down by the ending, it felt rushed and slightly lacking in comparison to the remainder of the book.
Published on 6 Jan 2009 by R. Cruise


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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Future Human Immortals Roam the Milky Way!, 9 Oct 2009
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This excellent novel has a short story prequel, unfortunately absent from this volume: 'The Thousandth Night'. It is available in Gardner Dozois One Million A.D. anthology. As for House of Suns, in my humble opinion, this is Reynolds' best novel to date. Future immortal clones of a person explore the Milky Way and meet to reconvene every 200,000 years. Reynolds has this unique ability to render his science as captivating as the story itself. Read Thousandth Night first!
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Science Fiction at its best, 22 Jun 2009
This review is from: House of Suns (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
Up to Reynolds' usual high standards. As far as I'm concerned Science Fiction is mainly about ideas and you may rest assured that there's no pseudo science techno babble from the master of hard Science Fiction. Lots of high tech concepts and deeper characters than in the Revelation Space novels. Don't want to give away the plot but well worth reading.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, with minor reservations, 9 Feb 2010
By 
Jonathan Oakey (Brussels Belgium) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: House of Suns (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
I have just finished reading House of Suns, which is the first - and certainly not the last - of this author's books that I have read. It is quite a long book (consistent with the span of its vision, perhaps) and does indeed start quite slowly - I think it was around page 150 when I started to see a plot emerging! Nevertheless, the pace gradually accelerates, and a truly fascinating work emerges by the end.
I've read a fair amount of sci-fi and there are certainly echoes and ideas that are similar to some other writers. Banks has been mentioned, although Reynolds is less quirky (without wishing to denigrate either side of the quirkiness gap). I certainly see similarities to Arthur C. Clark and Charles Sheffield (one of my favourite sci-fi authors).
I loved the breadth of imagination and the galaxyy- and universe-wide scope of the book. The hints of space war, while focusing on the personal events, together with the reader's gradually unfolding understanding of the environment and story gel together very well, and the ending is generally superb.
I do still have a couple of issues with the book - not serious ones, but where I feel the whole book could have been improved. Firstly, the three-way first person narrative is quite confusing. This is ok once you unravel it, but there is not enough difference in the perspectives and writing style of Campion and Purslane to make this a feature rather than an annoyance. It does grant the author a two-camera way of telling the story, but third person narrative allows multiple cameras and is less confusing.
Secondly, the background narrative of Abigail's story was interesting, but I felt that it needed to be woven into the main story more at the end. Without wishing to write a spoiler, there is a revelation late in the book about the composition of the Gentian shatterlings (which contrasts with that of the Marcellins) which I really wanted to see resolved, but wasn't. OK, this is Reynolds' story and his choice how to tell it, but it felt like a major lacuna.
In the end, though, a thoroughly fascinating and enjoyable book, and I look forward to reading more of his works.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favourite Alastair Reynolds book., 21 Jan 2010
By 
fatsovonchubby (Glasgow, Scotland) - See all my reviews
This review is from: House of Suns (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
Alastair Reynolds has, for me personally, created the most enjoyably far flung hedonistic technological future universe series of stories that I have read. The ever-present contrast between incredible/lethal technology and human spirit/emotions, coupled with the very palpable tension between humanoid races and sinister agents (of familiar humanoid corruptability) makes the "Revelation Space" story threads a fascinating read for any sci-fi fan. Reynolds has created a succession of extremely good books - punctuated here and there by a couple which are frankly too long, complex, and (gasp) boring.

But I have to say - amongst the gems of Reynolds crop of interwoven settings, characters and situations, House Of Suns is the story that shines brightest. It is, in it's own guise, a simple love story, surrounded by carnage and adventure and a pretty strong message about prejudice and the ability to see others for who they are, and not what they are (The Machine races). Deep? Not really - a good adventure but the morals are there for sure.

(Some spoiler) The plot builds at a satisfying pace and pretty the internal strife amongst those in House Gentian just gives an edgy chaos to the already shaky situation that the survivors find themselves in. I loved the sectioning - rather hilarious to find all of the thin sheets of human still able to communicate openly - and the slightly unsettling appearance and actions of Hesperus to begin with add a sense of distrust and suspicion. Ultimately the true nature of the old Machine races comes to the fore and our unlikely golden hero saves the day - and our lead characters.

I literally had misty eyes at the end of this book - and whilst it maybe doesn't have *quite* the same interplanetary warfare and destruction that some other books have - the action is very well used in terms of being absolutely centred on individuals and thus the tension is top notch in bits (Purslane and Hesperus hiding in Silver Wings' ship bay from Cadence and Cascade).

1000 years sleeps and wormholes later - the ending of the story - I don't know - some ardent sci fi fans may have though it to be a little contrived, maybe a little sentimental. But I absoutely loved it - perhaps just because it was a little unexpected (not Campion and Purslane's imminent reunion - but Hesperus' sacrifice - and the emotional response that took from me!).

All in all - a tremendous sci fi adventure - and my favourite Alastair Reynolds book to date.
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reynolds for the Booker, why not?, 16 Feb 2009
I have just finished House of Suns and I think that it may be one of the finest pieces of literature I have ever read.

It is quite simply a beautiful novel. It's sci-fi context is irrelevant to its beauty and I almost wish that he had written the novel about contemporary shatterlings travelling the world and gaining experiences. Maybe if the setting had been New York and not Neume then this book would be sitting in the sci-fi best sellers and the generic fiction top ten lists.

This book is a massive shift from the revelation space books. Don't get me wrong, I have read them all, but House of Suns is the sum of all of Mr Reynolds previous writing. It is funny, witty and breathtaking but and this is the killer, it is extraordinarly well written.

As I read it the most obvious comparable author was Haruki Murakami. The way Mr Reynolds takes modern themes such as loss and alienation and mixes them with humour and wonder is sublime.

This is not just good sci-fi this is wonderful story telling.

How do you nominate a book for the Man Booker?
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Losing his way ?, 17 July 2008
By 
Chris "chrisgb" (UK) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
Reynolds has created another little macrocosm of characters for his readers - a family of parthenogenic clones exploring the galaxy for its own sake, and as you can probably guess, it's not quite fluffy kittens and ice-cream - Reynolds does like his maybe-dangerous-maybe-not characters.

As usual, Reynolds' writing is top-notch, but I felt the final ending was a little inconclusive this time. It's also hard to say whether or not this series is going anywhere (probably not; look at Pushing Ice). Ultimately, I quite enjoyed this book; Reynolds doesn't disappoint - until you read the very the last page. I also wasn't too fond of the "Palatial" interludes - in fact, I started skipping them, only to find that as I feared, they contained an important plot element. I didn't like this at all, since I have fairly strong feelings that sci-fi is sci-fi, fantasy is fantasy, and the two are very different animals which absolutely should not interbreed.

Worth a look, but maybe you should wait for the paperback - which will only be a couple of quid cheaper, mind.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Superb space opera!!!!!!, 6 Jun 2008
Let me start by saying that any fan of Reynolds will love this book. It is a true space opera just like the inhibiter series. Vast scale and vast ideas combined with a new interesting vision about the future developent of human societies over huge time spans. This is all delivered in the best Reynolds style, so it is never boring and always keep up the pace. It is brilliant!

The review by Dr. T. Fallone here on amazon had me a little worried. His critisism about god like technology had me worried that the book plot would be :"omg, how do we solve god like problem no 1?!" ..."well, of cause we use god like solution no 1!"

I am happy to say that is not the case. In fact, I dont agree at all with his statements. The book is not about god like technology.

To sum up: BUY THIS BOOK - you will not regret it!! Good plot, good characters and good pace.
Im just sad it will likely be another year before his next book is out
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow! Absolutely brilliant., 6 Aug 2010
By 
Willy Eckerslike (France) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: House of Suns (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
On my continuing mission to find some modern Sci-Fi that I enjoy as much as the classics from the likes of Azimov, Harrison, Pohl, Aldiss and the rest, I have recently been stumbling around rather unsuccessfully. I obviously encountered the incomparable Iain M. Banks back in the late 80's but I have never found anyone else with his depth and scope of imagination.

Until, that is, I happened across Alistair Reynolds while browsing for new (to me) authors. What a find! I suppose this book could be summed up as an ultimately intergalactic space opera action mystery love story, but that doesn't do it justice. The shatterling concept, by itself, is brilliantly original, but the characterisation and galaxy & millennia spanning narrative are simply magnificent. I'm not entirely sure the early life of Abigail Gentian and her subsequent Palatial obsession adds an awful lot to the story, but inasmuch as they pertain to her personality and that of her shatterlings, they are relevant and add depth to the narrative. There are, of course, nuggets gently borrowed from other masterpieces of the genre, but these are in no way derivative; more of a respectful homage to earlier masters.

There is nothing more to add. More Alistair Reynolds - Now!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Absolutely brilliant, 3 May 2009
By 
Caspar Aremi "aremi.me.uk" (London, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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I enjoy 'space operas' but have only read one other of Alistair Reynolds, Revelation Space. I tend to find them very difficult to get in to, hard to follow and have to read right to the end to really understand whats going on. Not so with this one - you are involved immediately, getting to know the main characters and their circumstances easily and the set-up of the universe is easy to get your head around.

Some of the dialogue is a bit clunky, but the story is fantastic and kept me drawn in right until the very end. I hope he follows up with more novels set in this universe, but until then, I'm going to go back and read the rest of his collection of work!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An enjoyable read but lacking something at the end, 6 Jan 2009
By 
R. Cruise - See all my reviews
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This was my first time reading a book by Alastair Reynolds. I thoroughly enjoyed it and look forward to reading more by him. Though I felt let down by the ending, it felt rushed and slightly lacking in comparison to the remainder of the book.
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House of Suns (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
House of Suns (GOLLANCZ S.F.) by Alastair Reynolds (Paperback - 12 Mar 2009)
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