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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Deeper and deeper into Takeshi's World(s)
Yes, the best Richard Morgan yet.
Yes, a tale that helps us understand Kovacs' behaviour in this and previous novels, without you necessarily agreeing with many of his actions. This is despite his own (and Morgan's ??) attempts to justify them.
Yes, a book that seriously rewards re-reads, as I for one tore through it first time and missed some key content...
Published on 25 July 2005 by S. H. Drake

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ambiguous Feelings
I've read all 4 of Richard Morgan's novels now, having just finished the Takeshi Kovacs trilogy, and while I found the books extremely hard to put down, I have finally come up against a wall in this last novel. The depth of the characters has improved with each part of the trilogy and even the far fetched SF concepts are given a life that many, if not most SF would love...
Published on 8 July 2009 by Amazon Customer


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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, 6 May 2007
By 
WJ FOX (London) - See all my reviews
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For those who are new to the world of Takeshi Kovacs, it's well worth reading the previous two novels in the trilogy (Altered Carbon and Broken Angels). Nevertheless, this book can be read on its own as a "standalone" novel.

The story is set about 500 years in the future and takes place on Harlan's World, a lush planet several light years from Earth. Technology is so advanced that people have achieved a kind of immortality. Their minds can be digitized and backed up on disks, then downloaded into new bodies following their death. This can lead to its own unique problems, however, which becomes clear as the novel progresses.

Without giving anything away, the plot centres around Kovacs - a man who once belonged to a group of elite soldiers known as the "Envoys" but is now on the run, having been involved in a number of incidents. The story follows him on a series of heart-stopping chases around the planet, during which he encounters a number of characters from his past, including one extremely important woman whose presence could change the world. There are various subplots, which ultimately converge and lead to a thrilling climax.

Overall, I loved this book, just as I loved the previous two novels in the series. There are some fascinating twists and turns, betrayals, and unexpected appearances from various people. The action scenes are particularly good, and this is where Richard Morgan really excels. In fact, I can't think of another writer who describes action scenes as well as he does. His style is excellent.

If you love sci-fi with a nice blend of action and dialogue, then you'll love what this novel has to offer. There are tons of original ideas and concepts here, futuristic technology, cool characters, breathtaking chases and surprises, interesting cities and locations... all of which make for a very absorbing setting. Takeshi Kovacs is violent and often flawed, a kind of anti-hero - but at the same time you're really rooting for him throughout the story.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Stuff, 2 May 2005
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Mr. Philip Relph "purchzguru" (Wolverhampton, UK) - See all my reviews
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I've bought all of Richard Morgans novels so far and I can honestly say that each one has been better than the last. Woken Furies is a superb novel, Morgan can really hold his head high with the true greats if SF. I'm looking forward to the next one already (but not before I've read WF one more time!).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Ambiguous Feelings, 8 July 2009
This review is from: Woken Furies (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
I've read all 4 of Richard Morgan's novels now, having just finished the Takeshi Kovacs trilogy, and while I found the books extremely hard to put down, I have finally come up against a wall in this last novel. The depth of the characters has improved with each part of the trilogy and even the far fetched SF concepts are given a life that many, if not most SF would love to create for themselves. The background of an ancient all pervasive alien culture is very well done, being used as both a plot device in the latter two novels and as a texture to the trilogy in general. The final novel paints a very detailed picture of the world his characters are on, which gives one, I think, a feeling of experiencing something lived in, not a sterile SF world, almost, but not quite Gibsonesque in detail.

All three novels are incredibly violent, and Richard Morgan's deep and biting political cynicism shows its head in each one of them, finally coming to the fore in this final novel where the hero gets caught up in a 300 year old revolution with digitally reincarnated revolutionaries, main characters dying with almost predictable regularity, only to be revived and then in some cases killed again. Richard Morgan doesn't take the easy road with his characters and it is a tribute to his skill as a writer that the dysfunctional morals and ethics of the hero, Takeshi Kovacs, and his inability to even remotley come to grips with his past made me feel an active hatred for the character, wishing by the middle of the book that he would finally just die, as all the other characters in the novel seemed to wish for.

While Richard Morgan's hard realism - ugly, violent corrupt people are standard fare - in the last novel I almost found that I was seeing too much of what I call English hard man politics shining through, very similar in its way to Neal Asher's brand of depicting the corrupt abuse of power. It gets tiring, I feel. Similarly, there is a lot of very graphic violence and a lot of very graphic sex. I have to be honest here in that I felt that the author was almost on a kind of mastubatory trip at times, and I couldn't glean any real difference in the women the main character was having sex with, except that he would have done well in hard-core porn and that the women were all "long-limbed" and that almost every woman character in the novel who wasn't lesbian wanted to and ended up also having sex with the hero. I found it somehow gratuitous.

As with his forth novel Black Man or 13 (in the USA), I couldn't escape the feeling in this one, that the author had gotten some of his ideas from other SF authors, in the case his Martian Ascension reminded me somehow very much of Iain M Bank and his subsumed societies having ascended to a higher plain.

All that said, I liked thebook and the series immensely and can recommend it to anyone with an open mind and a strong stomach.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another storming SF novel, 8 Mar 2005
By 
kovacs-san (Berkshire, UK) - See all my reviews
I've read all of Richard Morgan's novels - all of them several times and consequently it was with great anticipation I ordered Woken Furies from Amazon. To my amazement the book arrived pre-publishing date and I immediately dropped what I was reading (well, re-reading as it was Broken Angels) and started on the new one. Fantastic!! The central plot thread certainly keeps you hooked and I'm certainly not going to give it away here. Suffice to say that being back on Harlan's World fleshes out some of the background alluded to in Altered Carbon and Broken Angels and brings it all together with the plot in this one. Takeshi's up to his old tricks and in the midst of all the carnage Richard Morgan has deftly woven together another stunning read. A 5 star must buy.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars They keep getting better, 28 July 2005
By 
Andrew Lewis (Durham, UK) - See all my reviews
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Third installment in what seems to be turning into the Takeshi Kovacs saga. For newcomers to these books, it's an intelligent, highly original scifi thriller, pretty violent piece of work. Our 'hero' is an ex-Envoy (a group of elite soldiers) - and we join him in the middle of working out what appears to be a very serious grudge against a group of religious fanatics - events, of course, go rapidly out of his control, and he quickly finds himself on the run from a much younger (and even nastier) edition of himself, while trying to protect someone that seems to be the unexplained reincarnation of a long dead, legendary revolutionary/local hero.
It's a great read - Tak is a fascinating and unlikely hero, the plot and mysteries posed are great, and the answers are very satisfying ones.
For those who've enjoyed the previous two, there's a lot to look forward to in this. We finally get to spend time on Tak's homeworld, and explore a great deal of why he is what he is... we find out a great deal more about Quellism, about the 'Martians', we finally meet other Envoys, and explore a bit more about how they got their fearsome reputation... it brings together a lot of the unanswered questions in the previous books.
Highly recommended, albeit not for the squeamish.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Kovacs Just Gets Better ad Better, 16 Oct 2007
By 
Dr. Robert Fisher (Oxford, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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Having just finished the third of the Takeshi Kovacs novels (the first was the excellent 'Altered Carbon', the second the fantastic 'Broken Angels') I am sat here missing Kovacs already and dealing with an overwhelming sense of wanting more! That usually tells me it's been a good read: and boy - 'Woken Furies' is a simply stunning read.

The significant difference between this outing and the previous two is that we find Kovacs a lot older, more world weary, even more dissatisfied with the life he leads and looking for something 'more' - though throughout the novel he clearly doesn't know what that 'more' is. Morgan's inspirational idea which drives the main point home is that the ruling Family of Harlan's World send a much younger version of Kovacs out to kill the older Kovacs; in essence, he pits the young, brash, wild and mad killer who ran amok in 'Altered Carbon' against the more mature, more experienced - and yes, more mellowed Kovacs that we find at the start of this novel. The difference between the two Kovacs versions is amazing - to the point that we actually begin to feel the rediscovery of the humanity of the older Kovacs. By the end of the novel we even, perhaps for the first time, begin to like Takeshi and share a sense of optimism not only for his future but for the world in which he lives. This is Morgan's greatest achievement in 'Woken Furies'.He begins to let us care for the lead character, and he begins to let his main character start to care again about the people he is living and working with. Remarkable.

The story itself is a wild malestrom of subtle clues, double-twists and highly unexpected plot twists; the action is frenetic, always well informed in terms of the technology and science being used, and blended to create a set of scenarios that draw you in both intellectually and emotionally. By the end, Morgan has us literally not wanting to leave Kovacs behind. He is facing a new dawn; there is real hope beginning to emerge in the man - and we desperately want to see what happens next.

Roll on the next Envoy novel; I can't wait. In the mean time, this merits reading and re-reading to pick up all the clues and brilliant characterizations that Morgan creates for us. Excellent novel; stunning writing; fantastic character. I cannot recommend this highly enough.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Morgans' Best?, 10 May 2007
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I really enjoyed Altered Carbon, loved Broken Angels and ... kind of liked Woken Furies. Having re-read this, I think it's possibly Morgans' best book. Expanding on Kovac's character further (his vendetta against the priests and what he does with their stacks is quite shocking) and his world, Morgan has created a dense, political novel that grips far beyond most 'science fiction'. If anything, the book is almost too full of ideas for its own good, but that's at worst a back handed compliment. It's very dense at times, and I think that's why it took me a second pass to really get into this.

I'd wondered if any of Morgan's titles would be made into films, but in the end, it's hard to see how they could be done justice. Intelligent, thought-provoking, funny and violent. Highly recommended.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Morgan does it again!, 6 April 2005
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I honestly thought Altered Carbon was unbeatable. But this. Is. Incredible.
Richard Morgan yet again thrills in a way few other authors can contend with. As a writer he can send your imagination to its very limits, whilst keeping your feet firmly on the ground.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Return to Origin, 8 May 2010
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This review is from: Woken Furies (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
The first Richard Morgan book I ever read was Broken Angels and I was completely blown away. The lead character Tadeshi Kovacs his milieu and back story created a cyberpunk thriller such as I had never read before.

I then went on a hunt for anything by Mr Morgan. I read Black Man and then realised that there was an earlier book about Tadeshi Kovacs - Altered Carbon - which was more by way of an origin story but still with the irresistible, at least to me, roller coaster mix of thriller and cyberpunk.

This book which may, or may not, be a conclusion of sorts to the loose trilogy of the adventures of the magnificent Tadeshi Kovacs. Bring our hero home once more to the planet of his birth and it's unique political heritage.

If you like thoughtful, politically provocative, cyberpunk thrillers. then this is certainly a book for you.

To try and sum it up think anarchosyndicalist, Chris Ryan hard man, cyberpunk thriller and you'll kind of get the idea.

Loads of fun and thought provoking too at both the technological and political levels. Oh and lots of big bangs and grunt grimy too
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars woken furies, 22 Feb 2010
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T. MUFTI (bournemouth, england) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Woken Furies (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
After reading this 3rd book in kovacs series i was thoroughly impressed. it was equally as good as altered carbon which was superb. Mind blowing, brilliant, har hitting violence!! if you love sci-fi you'll love this no doubt! Cant wait for his next book read all the others!
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Woken Furies (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
Woken Furies (GOLLANCZ S.F.) by Richard Morgan (Paperback - 4 Sep 2008)
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