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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surrealistic, silly and enjoyable
This is the first Robert Rankin novel I have read, and I have to say it was different from anything else I've ever read before.
I've avoided Rankins books before, thinking they sounded too silly and surrealistic for my tastes. However, while The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse certainly is bizzare, it is also a very interresting and entertaining read. It...
Published on 19 Jan. 2003 by Katrine Myra

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars bringing nursery rhymes back to life!
I did like this book primarily for bringing nursery rhymes back to life. Ok so it's hardly a conventional way of doing it by making them all 'real' and killing several of them off but then I've already come to realise that Rankin is anything but conventional. If I had to sum up this book I'd say it was like the film toy story but definitely for older teens and adults...
Published on 5 Feb. 2008 by Mr. B. L. Zebubble


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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surrealistic, silly and enjoyable, 19 Jan. 2003
By 
Katrine Myra (Oslo, Norway) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This is the first Robert Rankin novel I have read, and I have to say it was different from anything else I've ever read before.
I've avoided Rankins books before, thinking they sounded too silly and surrealistic for my tastes. However, while The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse certainly is bizzare, it is also a very interresting and entertaining read. It is a murder mystery set in a fantasy universe, with elements of comedy, horror and fairy tales.
The language is simple, as other reviewers have mentioned, but this in my opinion is not a bad thing. You almost feel as though you are reading a childrens book, a young childrens book even, and then Rankin hits you in the face with a horribly graphic murder or severly adult themes. The book at times has that disturbing feel of the nightmares you have as a child; the monsters under the bed are real, and that scary, ugly old toy really IS alive...
I reccomend this book to anyone seeking a different kind of reading experience, even if you are not a fan of fantasy or other speculative fiction. Personally, I will certainly be looking into other works by Rankin.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fun Fun Fun, 25 Aug. 2004
This review is from: The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
This is without doubt the funniest book I have ever read. I'll be honest I read the first few pages and thought this was a waste of money and after reading the back of the book I should have known better but by page 2 I started to get into it and by page 3 (not unusual) I was hooked!!! Eddie the bear is great fun and the banter between him and Jack is excellent. The jokes are well thought out an all though with some jokes you can see whats going to happen ie the Fat Sod caractures suicede bid the way it is written once you get to the punch line though you knew it was coming you STILL laugh loud and hard.
Buy this book. I've started on The Fandom of the Operator and I'm all ready hooked. so scratch buy this book buy all his books one by one and laugh.
EXCELLENT.
(I wonder if I got my point over well enough?)
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good first Rankin read., 4 Oct. 2002
I was hooked on this book from the first chapter. This is the first Rankin book I've read, so I can't compare it with any of the Brentford books, but it has taken a place in my list of favorite books. Rankin's phrasing and language sets up a wonderfully sinister atmosphere, and the dark (and slightly smutty) humour fits well. The ending isn't (too) predictable and some plot twists *do* come as a surpise.
I would recommend this book to anyone who isn't offended easily. There's dark humour but 'Hollow Chocolate Bunnies' is still lighthearted and fun. The story itself is entertaining and the first chapter's a gem.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious...one of Rankin's best., 16 Mar. 2004
By A Customer
I found this book completely fascinating. It's humour...with so much more than one would expect. Chocolate bunnies, alcohol- and sex-addicted teddies, and fairy tale creatures gone bad. I often found myself laughing out loud and it will keep you hooked from the very first page. I have read quite a few of Rankin's books, and this one, along with the Antipope, are in my opinion his best.
If you are a Douglas Adams, Tom Holt or Terry Prachett fan, I can assure you, you will enjoy this book. Buy this book. Or don't...your loss.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ahhh finally, 15 Oct. 2007
This review is from: The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
Finally a book that has everything, drunkenness, violence, police brutality, sex, car chases, guns and soft toys.

This book is fantastic.
The four star rating is because it's not perfect. however for what it is, which is a funny weird mind expanding book it out does almost everything in terms or originality and kept me reading constantly.
Another reason for a four and not five star rating is because it made me get only three hours sleep on a Sunday night rendering me useless at work.

The story is fast moving and keeps you guessing; obviously there's no way you could know what's coming next in a book like this and that's why it's so much fun to read. This book is escapism at practically its greatest it takes the reader out of this sometimes overly serious world and gives the mind a chance to exorcise its imagination again.

This is the first fiction I have read for a few years and I don't know why I stopped. If you need a book to help get you through a little bit of life then this is it, conjuring up vivid images and hilarious conversations between the characters Robert Rankin has created a pearl of a book.

So in summary if you have a lot on your mind and need to forget, read this book it is funny and easy going. After a reading session you may (as I did) find yourself wondering how economic it must be for a teddy to go and get drunk.

READ IT!
What have you got to loose.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 'The hollow chocolate bunnies of the WHAT?!?', 17 Sept. 2003
This review is from: The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (GOLLANCZ S.F.) (Paperback)
It was the title that first caught my attention- 'The hollow chocolate bunnies of the WHAT?!?' it was an unputdownable and unforgettable read.
So you think you know how the fairy tales work do you? damsels in distress and knights in shinning armour? Forget it, Robert Rankin brings an unbelievable twist to the stories we all thought we knew and loved. Humpty Dumpty is hard boiled like well ... an egg and little boy blue has his cane shoved up where the sun doesn't shine. but that is just the beginning. Jack, one of the countless in The city, has come to seek his fortune. unfortunately he has missed one tiny detail- The city is actually Toy City and this is only the start of his problems. He ends up teaming up with a rather raggedy teddy bear who goes by the name of Eddie, the bear of one ex private eye, Bill Winkle, they decide to follow up the murders and save Toy City from a fate worse than death. And from there things go off in a world of their own.
This wonderful book has all the fast paced action you would expect from a serious thriller with all of the laughs one would normally expect from Terry Prachett.
if you are looking for something different, something completely captivating then this is the book for you.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another most excellent read from Rankin, 19 Sept. 2002
By A Customer
After the very dark "Fandom of the Operator" and its thoroughly unpleasant characters, Rankin returns with a very light-hearted book of far-fetched fiction, based in Toy City.
The book is infested with jolly likeable characters, very funny one-liners and running gags. As always, the anarchic and clever story plays second fiddle to Rankin's play on words, for which he is in particularly impressive form this time around.
All-in-all a thoroughly entertaining read...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seriously Satisfying Reading by Robert Rankin, 15 Nov. 2013
By 
Glenn Cook (South Cave, near Hull UK) - See all my reviews
(HALL OF FAME REVIEWER)    (VINE VOICE)    (TOP 50 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Note this is a review of unabridged audio version read by the author Robert Rankin.

Well this book was a surprise - a big one, as big as Humpty Dumpty's inflated backside.

First who would have thought a story about toy town with Famous Nursery Rhyme Characters getting bumped off by a manic serial killer crossed with a hard film noire Phillip Marlow?

How can I explain it?

Imagine Seven crossed with Noddy,
Dexter crossed with Rupert The Bear,
Paddington Bear Crossed with Ripper Street
Or

Even Andy Pandy with the Exorcist and you have some idea what is in store.

Make no mistakes this is a book for adults only were Mother Goose runs the best Whorehouse in Town, Jill (of Jack and Jill fame) is a crack strumpet and Little Boy Blue is an ex crack head and really a Blue, provided they are uppers or downers, downing Boy Blue.

The story is about a serial killer on the loose and Edward Bear- Bill Winkie's partner in the Private detective agency along with an ex factory boy virgin- come to the Big City to find adventure and excitement and to loose his virginity.

Ted be friend's Jack and they tour through Toy town on the trail of the killer running about in their clockwork powered cars.
Jack looses his virginity but gains a career and a partner in the process.

There are laughs a plenty with the imaginative demises of the Nursery Rhyme Characters.
Humpty Dumpty is poached; Little Boy Blue meets his end with his end having a rocket powered crook fired up his backside and out the other side and Mother Goose gets the Oven ready Treatment.

The strange thing is it is still a decent detective story on line with those now popular series like Martin Beck or The Girl with The Dragon Tattoo or even Wallendar.
They re familiar yet strange and foreign.

He other delight for me is that the reader is actually the author and he is rather good.

This is a big surprise for me.
I agree with what Kenneth Williams once said.
That the actor is the better reader rather than the author.
(For example Jacqueline Wilson and Stephen Fry's portrayal of the Harry Potter stories)

But Rankin Bucks the trend.

He reads well and with great characterisation that really brings this excellent book to life.

Strange but I totally recommend this book (in the audio version) to you.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good place for Rankin newbies, but veterans may find it a little familiar., 22 Sept. 2010
By 
A. Whitehead "Werthead" (Colchester, Essex United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)    (REAL NAME)   
Jack is off to the city to make his fortune, which he has heard is the thing to do for a clever young chap in search of adventure. The city in question is Toy City, formerly Toy Town, but all is not well there. Someone is knocking off the city's rich elite. Humpty Dumpty has been boiled alive in his own swimming pool and Little Boy Blue has had a fatally intimate encounter with his own shepherd's crook. With the city's finest detective, Bill Winkie, missing, it falls to Jack and Bill's sidekick, Eddie Bear, to solve the case and find the serial killer, whose calling card is a hollow chocolate bunny...

Robert Rankin is the UK's second-biggest-selling writer of comic fantasy (after Terry Pratchett) but is a rather different humourist to his knighted colleague. Whilst Pratchett deals with satire, Rankin is much more of an absurdist and surrealist (or, indeed, an absurd surrealist) who comes across as a mix of Jack Vance and Spike Milligan after they've gotten spectacularly drunk and torn up the town. His books have a reputation as being somewhat impenetrable for the newcomer, consisting as they do of myriad references and running gags spanning dozens of novels (The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse is Rankin's 24th novel, of 32 published to date), although in practise there are several viable entry-points, with this novel - set in its own reality unrelated to the 'Brentfordverse' of most of his other books - being one of them.

The premise is both barmy and logical, clever and slightly derivative. The idea of there being a place where all the fictional toys and nursery rhyme characters live together isn't exactly new, but the depiction here of Toy City being dirty, run down and slightly seedy (Old Mother Goose is the madame of a high-class brothel) is well-handled. It's a little bit of a shame that Rankin doesn't wander further from his comfort zone by maybe treating the premise more seriously, more like a real noir thriller which just happens to be set in Toy City, but the result is nevertheless still entertaining. Rankin cleverly uses the classic nursery rhymes to build up a cast of interesting characters and riffs off the standard detective fiction tropes in an appealing (and sometimes metafictional) manner. For newcomers, this is also (despite the premise and title) Rankin at his more restrained, with a notable lack of sentient time-travelling vegetables providing the impetus for the action.

There is one major issue. If you are familiar with Rankin's other books, this one, despite its unique setting, will be very familiar. Several recurring gags reappear, with Jack, like every single other Rankin protagonist of note, coming into possession of a minigun at one point in the narrative for the purposes of causing havoc (although, possibly in deference to the setting's lack of modern cultural references, it is not described as being "like the one Blaine had in Predator,"). The presence of two protagonists, one tall and handsome and the other short and slightly seedy, is also a recurring Rankinism, seen in his other double-acts such as Cornelius Murphy and Tuppe of the splendid Book of Ultimate Truths. In short, seasoned Rankin fans may feel disappointed at the over-familiarity of events, whilst newcomers will likely enjoy it more.

The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (***½) is an amusing, occasionally hilarious slice of comic fantasy which makes a perfect entry-point for newcomers to Rankin's work, whilst more seasoned readers may find the experience enjoyable but also a little predictable. The book is available now (with new artwork) in the UK and on import in the USA.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Weirder than the usual Rankin..., 11 Nov. 2002
By 
Peter Fenelon - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Best described as "Trumpton Riots meets Psycho" with a fair dash of Eraserhead, this is a bizarre book even by Rankin's standards. Someone's murdering toys in Toy City - so far so weird. But that's just the starting point for Rankin's usual torrent of running gags, sinister forces, daft puns, urban legends, and general bizarreness. Not quite as self-referential as some of his earlier books (where "reality" in one is fiction in another and vice-versa!) this is a funny, tightly-plotted (yes, I'm saying that about a Rankin book!) and most of all deeply odd mystery... Of course, as all Rankin fans know nothing is necessarily what it seems, and no doubt in a sequel to one of the other sprouts of the Rankinverse we'll discover some strange facts about the characters from this one!
Yep, it's great. He's delivered the goods just as expected in his twenty-fourth novel and shows no signs of slowing down.
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The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (GOLLANCZ S.F.)
The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse (GOLLANCZ S.F.) by Robert Rankin (Paperback - 1 Aug. 2003)
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