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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We have met the enemy and he is us
So said a character in a U.S. comic-strip about 50 years or so ago. And so says Terry Pratchett in his typically funny, absurd and thoughtful "JINGO" as he takes on the absurdity of war and those who have led us into war since time began.
Jingo features Commander Vimes and the men, women, dwarves, trolls and undead members of the Watch. Jingo opens with Ankh-Morpork...
Published on 29 Nov 2005 by Leonard Fleisig

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Average
I'm a big fan of pratchett but this is a disjointed story with rather muddled dialogue. The core is there and there's a serious point to the book but it's never brought together satisfactorily and there really isn't any laugh out loud moments, as with some of his earlier work. If you're a fan then read on. If you're new to pratchett then there are better books of his,...
Published 6 months ago by Mr. A. OSULLIVAN


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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We have met the enemy and he is us, 29 Nov 2005
By 
Leonard Fleisig "Len" (Virginia Beach, Virginia) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
So said a character in a U.S. comic-strip about 50 years or so ago. And so says Terry Pratchett in his typically funny, absurd and thoughtful "JINGO" as he takes on the absurdity of war and those who have led us into war since time began.
Jingo features Commander Vimes and the men, women, dwarves, trolls and undead members of the Watch. Jingo opens with Ankh-Morpork on the brink of war. The small island of Leshp has risen miraculously from the Circle Sea. Although small and of little value to anyone the good citizens of Ankh-Morpork and their historical protagonists the Klatchcians each claim title to the land. Each claim ownership based on ancient claims of dubious origin. Sound familiar?
In very short order a Klatchian diplomatic mission arrives in Ankh-Morpork. However it it is clear that powerful forces of both nations are striving for the most efficient way to let loose the dogs of war. An assassination attempt is made, one in which Pratchett finds a way to evoke the assassination of President Kennedy in 1963. The too simple solution, the "one arrow" theory is quickly lost in a swirl of conspiracy theories. The drums of war beat faster and a war council, led by a cast of characters each of whom could be played by Peter Sellers in Dr. Strangelove, assume control of war planning. In short order Commander Vimes find himsaelf and his men immersed in an invasion while at the same time the Patrician, Lord Vetinari seems bent on following his own secret course of action.
Of course a mere description of the plot of a Discworld book can never quite do it justice. It is impossible in a short review to reference the many asides, jokes, cynical observations and allusions to our own experience here. Captain Carrot find himself immersed in Klatchian culture, learns the language, adjusts to the desert culture (which seems clearly to be located in the Middle east) and ends up bearing a striking resemblance to Lawrence of Arabia. The Ankh-Morpork high command, led by gentlemen soldiers with little knowledge of military affairs and even less common sense reminded me of the British and French high command from WWI days. There are light moments throughout the book. Nobby goes undercover and discovers his softer side. The visual image one gets from that alone is worth the price of admission. Vimes meets his Klatchian counterpart in 71-hour Ahmed and their interplay forms the heart of Jingo. As events race (and events always race in a Discworld book) towards a conclusion we find a pensive Vimes realizing that he can deal with small crimes like murder, but wondering whether a meaningless war isn't the biggest crime of all and one in which his own nation bears as much responsibility for as its enemies:
"It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone's fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I'm one of Us. I must be. I've certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We're always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things."
Yes, Vimes like Pogo has met the enemy and has realized it is us. Towards the end of the the book 71-hour Ahmed turns to Vimes and says "there's plenty of reasons for fighting Ankh-Morpork. A lie isn't one of them." I'll leave it up to the reader to determine whether such a sentiment is one that has applicability outside of Discworld.
As with his other Discworld books, Pratchett makes you laugh so hard you don't even realize you're thnking and that is a wonderful feat.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Simply amazing..., 22 Dec 1999
I always wonder how Pratchett manages to become better with every bhook he writes. jingo is really one of the best novels i've ever read. Forget everything you know about Pratchett, forget the craziness of the first Discworld books, forget the fun, forget Discworld, cause this is serious stuff. Of course Pratchett is still funny, but that has become background. I wouldn't read Jingo because it's funny. Jingo (like Pratchett's other more mature novels) isn't only funny, but also much richer than the previous novels. The characters are now well-known and more developped, yet retaining the basic characteristics that define them. Vetinari, more obscure than ever, acts for the first time openly, instead of intriguing. Leonard da Quirm is the pèerfect counterbalance to Vetinari. The plot is a mix of crime novel (as all the Guard books, but this time even more misterious) and political satire. The island of Leshp actually refers to a small island that rose from the seas a few years ago in the Aegean sea, exactly between Greece and Turkey, and nearly drove those two countrys to war. Other examples are some small islands that China claims from Taiwan, or the Spratley islands in the South Chinese Sea, claimed by 7 countries or so. Pratchett never invents anything. He always takes from real life, mixes it up with Discworld logic, wraps it up in a clever story with characters more human than even humans (humans would never admit that they act like Discworld characters, but in fact they are even worse), puts a bit of philosophy into it, and voila your next masterpiece of the year. The book is so rich that everytime you read it, you find new elements in it. Pratchett is really the greatest english author since Shakespeare (really!).
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jingo review., 1 April 2006
By A Customer
This review is from: Jingo: Discworld: The City Watch Collection (Discworld Novels) (Hardcover)
Jingo is a political thriller.In Jingo a new continent has risen from the ocean mid-way between Ankh-Morpokian and Klatchian waters and now Sam Vimes as well as the assorted species of the night watch including new constables Shoe and Swires have to stop a crime so big that there are no laws against it:war.If you like reading sci-fi,fantasy then read Jingo by terry pratchett.If you enjoy this book then read books 8,15,19,24,27 and 32.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We have met the enemy and he is us, 5 Dec 2005
By 
Leonard Fleisig "Len" (Virginia Beach, Virginia) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
So says Terry Pratchett in his typically funny, absurd and thoughtful "JINGO" as he takes on the absurdity of war and those who have led us into war since time began.
Jingo features Commander Vimes and the men, women, dwarves, trolls and undead members of the Watch. Jingo opens with Ankh-Morpork on the brink of war. The small island of Leshp has risen miraculously from the Circle Sea. Although small and of little value to anyone the good citizens of Ankh-Morpork and their historical protagonists the Klatchcians each claim title to the land. Each claim ownership based on ancient claims of dubious origin. Sound familiar?
In very short order a Klatchian diplomatic mission arrives in Ankh-Morpork. However it it is clear that powerful forces of both nations are striving for the most efficient way to let loose the dogs of war. An assassination attempt is made, one in which Pratchett finds a way to evoke the assassination of President Kennedy in 1963. The too simple solution, the "one arrow" theory is quickly lost in a swirl of conspiracy theories. The drums of war beat faster and a war council, led by a cast of characters each of whom could be played by Peter Sellers in Dr. Strangelove, assume control of war planning. In short order Commander Vimes find himsaelf and his men immersed in an invasion while at the same time the Patrician, Lord Vetinari seems bent on following his own secret course of action.
Of course a mere description of the plot of a Discworld book can never quite do it justice. It is impossible in a short review to reference the many asides, jokes, cynical observations and allusions to our own experience here. Captain Carrot find himself immersed in Klatchian culture, learns the language, adjusts to the desert culture (which seems clearly to be located in the Middle east) and ends up bearing a striking resemblance to Lawrence of Arabia. The Ankh-Morpork high command, led by gentlemen soldiers with little knowledge of military affairs and even less common sense reminded me of the British and French high command from WWI days. There are light moments throughout the book. Nobby goes undercover and discovers his softer side. The visual image one gets from that alone is worth the price of admission. Vimes meets his Klatchian counterpart in 71-hour Ahmed and their interplay forms the heart of Jingo. As events race (and events always race in a Discworld book) towards a conclusion we find a pensive Vimes realizing that he can deal with small crimes like murder, but wondering whether a meaningless war isn't the biggest crime of all and one in which his own nation bears as much responsibility for as its enemies:
"It was so much easier to blame it on Them. It was bleakly depressing to think that They were Us. If it was Them, then nothing was anyone's fault. If it was us, what did that make Me? After all, I'm one of Us. I must be. I've certainly never thought of myself as one of Them. No one ever thinks of themselves as one of Them. We're always one of Us. It's Them that do the bad things."
Yes, Vimes like Pogo has met the enemy and has realized it is us. Towards the end of the the book 71-hour Ahmed turns to Vimes and says "there's plenty of reasons for fighting Ankh-Morpork. A lie isn't one of them." I'll leave it up to the reader to determine whether such a sentimentis one that has applicability outside of Discworld.
As with his other Discworld books, Pratchett makes you laugh so hard you don't even realize you're thnking and that is a wonderful feat.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The best yet!, 12 Jan 2004
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Okay, okay, I admit - I'm relatively new to Terry Prachett Books. It's not something I'm proud off, because I've wasted so many years NOT reading his books which I have to say was a serious judgement error on my half cos his books just keep getting better and better!
I randomly decided to try the Discworld series after years of avoiding them (for no particular reason other than the covers were too colouful!) and now I adore the City Watch characters! Sam Vimes is great and it's always interesting to see what Carrot will come up with next! And Jingo is the best in the series (well, at least the City Watch - I haven't read any Death or Witches ones yet) since Guards! Guards! (a classic and great introduction to the Discworld)
In Jingo 'politics' becomes involved with an attempted assissintion in Ankh-Morpork and the Watch is on the case, which leads to war and a trip to the Klatchian desert for our heroes! As ever Terry Prachett had put in some truly great one-liners which made me giggle outloud on the train (Lord knows what the people next to me thought!) and the idea of Nobby dressed as a woman (read the book!) kept me entertained for hours! Perhaps the most enjoyable Prachett so far! If you are a Prachett fan, you won't need me to encourage you to buy it (definetly worth re-reading!) and if you're not, take a risk and start reading today!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars So well written, you'll never notice how clever it is, 15 May 2007
By 
S. Bailey "will work for books" (London) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Our world has islands that sink; Discworld has an island that rises slowly back from the sea, "like a cat that's been away for a few days and knows you've been worried". And because the citizens of Ankh-Morpork have a fine, entrepreneurial spirit, and the people of Klatch are ruthless and greedy, with an eye for the main chance (or is that the other way around?), blows are soon struck, and, despite its lack of an army, Ankh-Morpork goes to war.

The resulting farce is one of the best things that Terry Prachett has ever written. Sam Vimes as a character goes from strength to strength, ably offset by the just-too-good Captain Carrot and the exceedlingly human werwolf Angua. Perhaps best of all, we get Vetinari out of the Oblong Office and at his scheming, magnificent Macchiavellian best (he'll be Alan Rickman in the film, I know it). And while the book has much to say about war and its pointlessness, honour and justice and the nature of imprisonment, these thoughts are so inextricably woven into the comedy that you'd never notice you were thinking at all. Magnificent.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars one of his best, 24 July 2003
By 
This is one of my favorite Pratchett books! If you've never read Terry Pratchett before: Welcome to a thinly veiled version of London in which social classes and races are represented by various fanatic creatures: gargoyles, humans, trolls, dwarves, etc.-all trying to live together and get along. Uberwald is Germany. Klatch is something like the near east. You'll recognize other places. Disc World is basically earth with London at the center and a few weird twists.
For those who are familier with Pratchett: This is one of the books featuring the Night Watch, but it's a somewhat mixed media performance with a lot from the Patrician (who is my favorite) and Lenard of Querm, also a bit from the wizards. A mysteries island rises out of the sea and both Klatch and Ank-morpork claim ownership. Some people in each country are willing to go to war over the island...but do they have ulterior motives?
In the confusion of a visit from the Klachian prince, Angua is kidnapped (want to know how to kidnap a werewolf? Read the book!) and the whole Watch sets off after her to Klatch, where they unravel a cunning conspiracy. The book has plenty of depth, makes a number of valid points about war, politics, racial prejudice (both prejudice against a minority race AND prejudice in favor of a minority race), and is just superior all-round storytelling. This is one of the few Pratchett's I've read twice.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Jingo all the way!, 9 Dec 2002
On holiday with nothing much to do, I picked up a copy of jingo and decided to give it a go. From the opening pages and the mention of curious squid (so called because as well as being squid, they are curious. That is to say, their curiosity is the curious thing about them.) I was hooked. Only 2 years later I have finished reading his entire back catalogue and am eagerly awaiting the next installment.
I even went as far as to base my critical evaluation essay for my English Higher on his books (I got as A, the marker must have been a fan as well). my subject was the thing that most attracted me to his writings in the first place, the parodies of our world that are rife throughout his writings. Although his world could obviously not exist, it is so close to our own in many ways that you often wonder. For those who have not read Pratchett, start at the beginning with 'Colour of Magic' and work your way through. I promise by the end of it you will look at the modern world in a totally different way. All the ridiculousness of our society will suddenly shine through and practically stand out like a firefly in a very dark cave.
You will wonder why you didn't see them before.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Veni vermini voomui, 22 Nov 2010
"Jingo" in Terry Pratchett's hugely popular Discworld series, was first published in 1997 and is the fourth to focus on Sam Vimes and Ankh-Morpork's City Guard.

Sam is the Commander of the City Guard, and - having married Lady Ramkin - a member of the nobility. It's fair to say he's not your typical hero : he doesn't like the Undead (particularly vampires), Assassins (they keep trying to kill him) and - in keeping with an old family tradition - Kings (not an ideal musketeer then). However, despite being terminally suspicious, he is also a very likeable and fair man. While in the past Sam has dealt with the `small' crimes, Jingo sees him moving in a new environment : war and - even more dangerously - politics. The book opens with a mysterious island called Leshp rising from beneath the sea, exactly halfway between Ankh-Morpork and Klatch. Both, naturally, claim it as their own...

Klatch is a huge, multi-ethnic empire, and rivals Ankh-Morpork commercially. Furthermore, it's far ahead of Ankh-Morpork in terms of technology and scientific knowledge. Yet, the average Morporkian - despite having an enormous appetite for Klatchian curry and kebabs - seems to look down on "Johnny Klatchian" as some sort of primitive coward. Unfortunately, this couldn't be further from the truth : the D'regs, for example, are a terrifying desert tribe who trust no-one and will fight anyone on a matter of principle.

In an attempt to resolve the situation - Klatch's Prince Khufurah arrives in the city for discussions with Vetinari. Depressingly, anti-Klatchian tensions rise in Ankh-Morpork...which naturally makes things very difficult for those of Klatchian extraction living in the city. So, when someone tries to assassinate Khufurah - apparently a lone bowman - nobody seems too surprised. Naturally, this only cranks things up at a `diplomatic' level, and - with the heads of the city's Guilds raising private armies - Sam is really up against it...

Although numbers in the Watch continue to rise, Sam still relies most on those he knows best. His most capable officer is Captain Carrot - who was born human, although raised as a dwarf. Carrot is an incredibly innocent and honest character, though many believe him to be Ankh-Morpork's rightful King. (Sam has - to date - refrained from beheading him). Carrot's girlfriend, Angua, is also a member of the City Guard though - particularly useful, given that she's a werewolf. Sergeant Detritus, a troll, seems a natural and likeable cop...though, unfortunately, he becomes a little more stupid as the temperatures rise. Unfortunately, Sam has to do without his most experienced officers for much of the book - Sergeant Colon and Corporal Nobbs (a confirmed slacker and probably human) are roped into a secret mission... although he has some help from two new recruits : Fred Shoe, a zombie, and Buggy Swires, a gnome.

Another very funny book from Pratchett, with a storyline 'underneath' that would have made cracking thriller. The anti-Klatchian attitude of the average ignorant, bigoted, ill-informed Morporkian was a little depressing at times...even more so, given how attitudes have hardened in the real world in recent years. An excellent book though, and highly recommended.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Our island, 20 Jun 2010
This is one of my favourite Terry Pratchett novels, with a plot that is at once gloriously absurd and worryingly believable. An island rises from the sea between two nations. It's a tiny island of no strategic importance and with no valuable resources yet neither can tolerate the idea of their rival claiming it. And so they go to war.

Shot through with Pratchett's fantastic wit the book never drags for a moment. Pompous, out of touch generals... OTT patriotic propaganda... patronising stereotypes of other ethnicities: this book has it all. Plus vampires, werewolves, dwarves and all the other 'diverse' inhabitants of Ankh-Morpork - the city that makes New York look like a sleepy seaside town.

Can Sam Vimes, the long-suffering commander of the City Watch save the day?
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Jingo: Discworld: The City Watch Collection (Discworld Novels)
Jingo: Discworld: The City Watch Collection (Discworld Novels) by Terry Pratchett (Hardcover - 11 Nov 1997)
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