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4.6 out of 5 stars
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4.6 out of 5 stars
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on 3 December 2013
I have read this book from cover to cover so let me make it clear that I do know what it is I am talking to you about. When it comes to reviewing a book like this there really is only one way to go about it. For instance I found that the chapters were quite short on the whole which made it ideal to read when taken short and having to use the smallest room in the house for a few moments. Leafing through the pages of this tome passed the time I was passing while I was passing what I was passing. Oh hang on that sounds a bit unpleasant doesn't it? Forget that. On the other hand the wealth of information (and tips) squeezed into each section of this memoir shed a lot of light into the early life of Count Arthur Strong when he lived (and worked) with his 'mother' and 'father' as he called them. Reading these words, which he typed up himself, it is hard not to hear Arthur's voice in one's head. Some of the antidotes related by Count Strong on these pages are already partially in the public domain but none the worse for being re-told in print. The writing style flows just as naturally and effluently as does his own speaking voice in the many stage, radio and TV appearances that we are more familiar with. His gift for public speaking is mirrored by his adept use of the words he uses and the way he writes them down. (despite being hampered to a degree by the manual typewriter loaned to him by Faber and Faber and Faber, his publishers, to produce the work upon - sometimes the CAPS LOCK GETS STUCK On (and his repeated requests for tippex fall upon deaf ears)
The feeling of being present at the birth of a literary masterpiece and being in close touch with the original manuscript is enhanced by the many annotations annotated in his own hand, with a biro I would imagine. Suggestions to the publisher, comments and aid memoirs bring the thing to life as a living breathing work in progress, and a reminder to buy stamps (which one gets the impression Arthur has meant to purchase but forgotten to do as is so easy when you have got as much in your head as he has - what with writing his memoirs and everything. In short if you enjoy Count Arthur Strong as you've seen or heard him up to now you will enjoy him on the page as much as you have on the stage, airwaves or screen. There are a few photographs in the middle too. Arthur promises that this is but volume one of what he hopes may be a series but it has taken him weeks to write this one so, you know, it may be some time before the next installment appears. Did I enjoy it I hear you ask? Suffice it to say through it all I always laughed and if that isn't helpful to you you must want your head examining.
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on 13 April 2014
I chose the audiobook above the book with pages because I wanted to share in the genius of Count Arthur's delivery. We were not disappointed, it is amusing and entertaining and if you buy it second hand, it is even cheap! The TV series with that chap Rory Kinnear in it was as good as it gets but if you want more, and who can have too much, then this audiobook gives you just that, more and lots of it. And to make sure we got my money's worth we lent it to a friend and, when I get it back from the terrible old scrounger, we will play it again, even if we go out before the end, not that I am advocating leaving any electrical equipment running unattended, especially that footspa which I still haven't got rid of, as the Fire Brigade are busy enough already putting smoke alarms on people's ceilings whether they want them or don't.
If you are a fan of the Count, you will most likely enjoy it, if you aren't then why are you bothering to read the review?
(Written badly in the style of CAS).
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VINE VOICEon 12 November 2014
Count Arthur Strong is one of my favourite comedy characters, so it came as no surprise that I also enjoyed this book. It is written in the same bumbling style as his radio and TV programmes and stage appearances and just like those, it had me laughing out loud. This is a very funny book and one that every fan of Count Arthur will enjoy.
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on 28 November 2013
Absolutely brilliant book, five star isn't enough. Especially when you think that each letter, word and paragraph was put to paper on an old type writer. Count Arthur is a genius
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Count On Arthur to Write A Brilliant Book.
If you loved the radio shows or even if you liked the television show the one that was on the telly called Count Arthur Strong as well funnily enough then you will like this magnificent tome.
(That's the old word for a book for them of you that doesn't know what that word tome (sounds like tomb) means)
Got it? Right I will carry on then.

This tome or book is one of the wonders of the literacy age in that its author Count Arthur Strong wrote it on an old typewriter and not the new fangled word processors thingamajigs like the Amstrad 64 or whatever.
The fact that the count (surely a misprint?_) managed to write this in his busy schedule on his kitchen table- and no I don't mean actually on the table because that would be pointless I mean imagine writing tit on a table for goodness sake- imagine the postage costs posting a table to the printers Faber and Faber and all that trouble getting a kitchen table on the bus to go to the main post office in the town- no that would be silly.
I mean he wrote it on paper and on a typewriter. He only managed to get the thing finished when, in a flash of inspiration like the Count is famous for having an inventive mind and such like he took the typewriter into the smallest room to compose the book- which if you thing about it is a good thing because word processors run on electricity and such like and you don't get electric plug sockets in toilets do you- and that would be silly having to buy a really long extension lead and all thaT.

SERIOUS- DAM THAT CAP LOCK
Seriously this is an excellent book that is easy to read because it has small chapters ( a bit like the Isle of Man and Sark Hell's Angels Clubs and such like).

It is funny.
If I were you (and I am not) I would waste no time at all in searching this book out at your local booksellers or do what I did and got it out of the local library.
Recommended.
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TOP 500 REVIEWERon 19 April 2014
For those enamoured with Count Arthurs' snobbery, prejudice, unquestionable self-belief and many, many confused musings on life, this Audio Book is elevated over the written word into an altogether higher realm by the delivery. Here, The Count himself delivers his own Memoirs (in his own speaking voice that he does): From the very minute of his illiterate birth... illegitimate birth I mean, through a difficult self-educated childhood (much spent on-stage in wartime Doncaster), borstal, National Service in Egypt, his stage and show-biz career (obviously there's a lot on that), a mistaken bankruptcy, his overseas escape from the excesses of fame (for all of 12 minutes in France)... and so it goes on... and on and on, ad flippin' nauseam. As you'd expect, it's a jumble of everyday nonsense, detours and deviations recalled in something that could only be described as a very loose form of order. And as you'd also expect, these Memoirs leave just enough of the Counts' life stories out to be able to extract at least a second (and possibly a third) volume, to be written and published at some future date. Probably.

Whilst a lot of the material here is based on classic tales re-told from the original Radio 4 Series, many of those tales that you thought you already knew are further suitably confused and elaborated upon to add a new twist or two - they're certainly worth hearing again. There's a considerable wealth of new and original material here too - which possibly could have been made into a whole new radio series if only he'd thought of that. Which he didn't. The idiot. But it does add many, many new and amusing tales recalled from his ever-faltering memory... or else he's blatantly making it up as he goes along, depending on his need to add to the word count for his publishers. With the usual rambling deviations, twisted interpretations and crossed wires, mispronunciation, malapropisms galore and a few Freudian slips, there's also a healthy dose of side-swipes at fellow celebrities, authors and performers with The Counts' usual thinly disguised envy: his casual yet cutting dismissal of their competence and comparative abilities is to be relished (the John Bishop put-down - CD1 Tr12 - is in my view a gem, and illustrates well the benefit of having The Count telling the tale in person). At 4 hours and 50 minutes running time spread over 4 CDs, for those that hunger for more of The Counts' classic tales to be told and re-told - by the master of the mixed metaphor that is Count Arthur Strong - this Audio Book he'll tell you himself is worth every penny. (And if you could pay in cash, he'd prefer that).
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on 7 February 2014
Well the book is typical Count Arthur, a jumble of thoughts, memories, mistakes in his inimitable amusing style. But oh, I missed Gerry, Sally, Malcolm, Geoffrey, Wilf and the rest of the radio gang. It carefully avoids mentioning any of them (apart from Barry Cryer, who I think is great) although some of the events he recounts are familiar if you have followed his Radio 4 series.

I still think he is an original, but I wish he hadn't moved to London.
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on 15 October 2014
If you have followed the career of the great British in-situ no, that wasn't it... institution - 'ang on, isn't that where they lock people up.. a mad-house... no, he's not a mad man- although er, wait a minute. Mebbe ... hmmm. Anyroad, if you haven't followed the metricorial rise and rise of Count Arthur - why not? He's like - famous, and everything. Been in Z-Cars and done stuff off of the radio too, as well. And through it all he's been such a humble man of the people.
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If you loved the radio shows or even if you liked the television show the one that was on the telly called Count Arthur Strong as well funnily enough then you will like this magnificent tome.
(That's the old word for a book for them of you that doesn't know what that word tome (sounds like tomb) means)
Got it? Right I will carry on then.

This tome or book is one of the wonders of the literacy age in that its author Count Arthur Strong wrote it on an old typewriter and not the new fangled word processors thingamajigs like the Amstrad 64 or whatever.
The fact that the count (surely a misprint?_) managed to write this in his busy schedule on his kitchen table- and no I don't mean actually on the table because that would be pointless I mean imagine writing tit on a table for goodness sake- imagine the postage costs posting a table to the printers Faber and Faber and all that trouble getting a kitchen table on the bus to go to the main post office in the town- no that would be silly.
I mean he wrote it on paper and on a typewriter. He only managed to get the thing finished when, in a flash of inspiration like the Count is famous for having an inventive mind and such like he took the typewriter into the smallest room to compose the book- which if you thing about it is a good thing because word processors run on electricity and such like and you don't get electric plug sockets in toilets do you- and that would be silly having to buy a really long extension lead and all thaT.

SERIOUS- DAM THAT CAP LOCK
Seriously this is an excellent book that is easy to read because it has small chapters ( a bit like the Isle of Man and Sark Hell's Angels Clubs and such like).

It is funny.
If I were you (and I am not) I would waste no time at all in searching this book out at your local booksellers or do what I did and got it out of the local library.
Recommended.
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on 27 February 2015
Fans of the great Count Arthur Strong will be wrapped and either awe at this heartfelt memoir. Rubbing shoulders with the likes of Anita Harris and Barry Fryer this legend of the variety circuit tells his life, from humble beginnings to being fetted as he is to this very day.
If you have never heard of the Count or of Steve Delaney, then you might want to give this epic tome a miss. It is one for the affissianado, or whatever you call them. The people who know the value of whatever it is and the price of nothing.
You could try listening to the Count on the BBBC iPlayer.
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