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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Testament of Cresseid & Seven Fables
The books were sent to me in brilliant condition & very quickly.
The book itself was interesting and the Fables lovely & varied, I realy enjoyed them
Published on 19 Feb 2010 by Margaret Ellerby

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3.0 out of 5 stars nice
There really isn't much that I can say about this other than that it's "nice". I know that that isn't saying much, but then neither does this book. Only for those who must.
Published on 8 Jun 2010 by Conor Murphy


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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Testament of Cresseid & Seven Fables, 19 Feb 2010
The books were sent to me in brilliant condition & very quickly.
The book itself was interesting and the Fables lovely & varied, I realy enjoyed them
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The medieval world brought to life, 9 Aug 2009
By 
John Southern (UK) - See all my reviews
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This is a beautiful book, with Henryson's 15th century Scots on one page and Heaney's witty translation facing it. Thus the reader can test Heaney's translations line by line, or allow himself to be lost in the rythms and images he creates for us. If you have ever wondered how Chaucer's tale of the Trojan war (Troilus and Criseyde)could have continued, here is a fascinating option. If you have never read Chaucer the morality tale speaks for itself. I dare say there has never been a more timely warning.
"Lovers beware and take good heed to whom
You give your love, for whom you suffer pain.
I tell you there are few enough among them
To be trusted to give true love back again."
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Pleasant Translation from the Nobel Laureate, 18 Oct 2010
By 
William D. Freeman "wdavidfreeman" (Southern California) - See all my reviews
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I quite enjoyed this volume. The subject matter here may not be as "meaty" as Heaney's translations of Sweeney and Beowulf, but as with those works the great Irish poet has produced a beautifully readable modern text.

The usual knock on Heaney's translations is that they contain more of his spirit than those of the original author, but that is to lose sight of the fact that these are translations. By all means read the original texts as well if you really want to get into the stories. At the same time, one can still appreciate the skill and results that go into producing these more accessible renditions.
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4.0 out of 5 stars very good, 20 Jun 2014
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Lovely edition which arrived in good condition. Slight tear to the dust jacket. The only real negative is that the edition I received obviously came from a household who smoked heavily, as it absolutely REEKS of stale nicotine. Easily solved though, as I've now sprayed each page with perfume :) I recommend this book to anyone interested in the mythology of Troy, Chaucer, and Aesop's Fables. A good read.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great, 2 April 2014
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perfect am a Heaney fan especially when I was taught by him when he was just beginning his career. Ace
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5.0 out of 5 stars I bought two!, 29 Jan 2014
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This review is from: The Testament of Cresseid & Seven Fables: Translated by Seamus Heaney (Paperback)
So delighted by Heaney's conversational, fluent style of translation of the Hendryson (reproduced in original form as well as in modern clothes) I bought this paperback and Kindle edition so I could carry it with me. The opportunity to compare texts of these haunting yet wholly down-to-earth medieval gems is priceless. Both are lovely, useful, treasurable editions.
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3.0 out of 5 stars nice, 8 Jun 2010
By 
Conor Murphy "ronoc" (ireland) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Testament of Cresseid & Seven Fables: Translated by Seamus Heaney (Paperback)
There really isn't much that I can say about this other than that it's "nice". I know that that isn't saying much, but then neither does this book. Only for those who must.
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13 of 19 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 9 July 2009
I was left with a feeling that the translation was rushed. I studied Henryson in university and found the poetry witty and punctual, expertly contracting philosophical ideas and humour in a successful beast fable form. Unfortunately this slim volume aims to merge a 'modern' idiom with Heaney's own poetical character, so successfully displayed in previous translations such as Sweeney Astray and Beowulf, that leaves the effect underwhelming. I found myself turning to the facing text to have a go at translating myself and often found that Heaney, for some reason desirous not to translate middle Scots words similar in structure to modern English, attempts to alter the scansion of the lines to fit in an extra syllable here, an extra word there. Perhaps a more ruthless editor would have asked for the translation to be re-worked. This problem disrupts the tone of the poems overall, as you often have to stop to go back and re-read a poorly constructed line (The Fox and the Wolf out of the Moral Fables is especially poor in this regard). Heaney is more successful when translating the Testament Of Cresseid, but even some of the problems which characterize the Fables are evident.
Overall I was left asking the question of why this translation was considered relevant. Obviously the commericality of the venture is paramount considering Heaney's clout in modern poetry sales. Why was a poet familiar with Scots dialogue not asked to translate? In fact, why translate at all? A serviceable edition of the poems - such as Fox's OUP edition from the 1980s - contains a glossary of Middle Scots words, and once a reader understands the reading conventions of the language, the work of reading the original becomes surprisingly pleasurable. While the Anglo-Saxon of Beowulf or the Middle Irish of Buile Shuibhne (Sweeney Astray) would require translation for an English readership, translating Henryson is less defensible, especially when the translation is as rushed as this is. I would suggest WRJ Barron's edition Selected Poems (Fyfield Books), which reproduces the original text and glosses some words, if you would like to experience the poetry of Henryson at first remove.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 27 July 2014
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Top marks to both of these geniuses.
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