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45 Reviews
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Stringer's weaker excursions
I've read and enjoyed all of the Jim Stringer stories, some of which are better than others; the two books preceding this are particuarly good. Unfortunately this is one of Stringer's less convincing investigations.

The story starts promisingly, but once Stringer arrives in Baghdad, he seems overcome by the heat and the alien culture. This is an effective...
Published on 18 July 2012 by cider glider

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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not his best
I've read most of the Stringer novels and enjoyed nearly every one of them. Not so this one. It felt a bit like a novella strung (groan!) out to novel length. The setting and premise was excellent and it promised a corker of a story, but it just sort of fizzled out before it got started.

The plot ended up being a little flimsy and, to be frank, I got a bit...
Published on 25 Jun 2012 by Ken


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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not his best, 25 Jun 2012
By 
Ken (Milton Keynes) - See all my reviews
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I've read most of the Stringer novels and enjoyed nearly every one of them. Not so this one. It felt a bit like a novella strung (groan!) out to novel length. The setting and premise was excellent and it promised a corker of a story, but it just sort of fizzled out before it got started.

The plot ended up being a little flimsy and, to be frank, I got a bit bored about halfway through. I persevered, but most of the characters (apart from Stringer) were a bit stereo-typed and didn't really get much further than being caricatures.

Sorry to be a bit negative, but I'm looking forward to the next one!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars One of Stringer's weaker excursions, 18 July 2012
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cider glider (Wiltshire, England) - See all my reviews
I've read and enjoyed all of the Jim Stringer stories, some of which are better than others; the two books preceding this are particuarly good. Unfortunately this is one of Stringer's less convincing investigations.

The story starts promisingly, but once Stringer arrives in Baghdad, he seems overcome by the heat and the alien culture. This is an effective device for conveying to the reader what it would have felt like to be in Baghdad then. However, as Stringer is the narrator, this leaves the reader in the lurch, and the plot doesn't progress much, until the regulator is opened wide in the final few pages, and plot makes up lost time to arrives at its destination.

I hope that Stringer's next case is more engaging.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Baghdad Railway Club, 18 Mar 2013
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Dr Nigel Marchbank (Eastbourne, United Kingdom) - See all my reviews
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This is perhaps the weakest of Andrew Martin's eight Jim Stringer books. In the earlier books, the atmosphere of railway life is well portrayed. However, in the latest, the characters are poorly delineated, the plot is weak and there is never a sense of tension leading to the final denouement.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The placenames are familiar, 20 Sep 2012
There is a certain topicality to this book, in that many of the placenames are familiar with recent (and ongoing) conflicts in the Middle East.

That helps to set the scene, but I found this book rather bitty and not one of AMs best. The jump from Stringer being a private in the previous book in the series, to now a member of the officer class as a captain, not very convincing. A step too far in my eyes.

Enjoyed the book, despite my reservations, but only three stars this time.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Train lines in the sand, 28 July 2014
For railway enthusiasts, the memorable images from Andrew Martin’s “The Baghdad Railway Club” are of lines heading off into the sand from the almost derelict Baghdad Station, some never reaching their destination because this is 1917 and the British India army and the Turkish army are in conflict. There is also a tension between the British Army and the British Army India. Jim Stringer, now Captain and formerly stationed on the Western Front, has a case to resolve which is a mixture of detection and counter-espionage: Who is responsible for the murder of a British officer whose body is found in one of the outbuildings of the station? And Is a British officer and Stringer’s local superior a Turkish spy at work in Baghdad?

Mostly, the combination of railway, detective and spy genres is successful, though the connections back to York Station (Stringer’s home station) stretch the railway dimension of the novel and, as so often with series, speak of the need to keep the series and the main character going rather than the needs of the story and plot. The military and counter-intelligence context tends to accentuate stereotypes in the characterisation, and the Arab characters don’t come across well when, rarely, they figure in the story. But, by way of a counter-balance, Iraq from the British occupiers’ point of view, is nicely conveyed, particularly the heat and the physical layout of the city and the extended railway system. With all that has happened in Iraq over the past three decades, the location has an added resonance.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A reasonable read but nothing more., 19 Mar 2013
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I do not feel this book is up to the usual high standards of Andrew Martin. I have read all the Jim Stringer books and enjoyed them all. He transposes you to the time and you feel you are there. However this book is thin on plot and seems to have too much padding. Almost as though he feels as though its time to write another Jim Stringer so lets get on with it. I must say though that I am still a fan and will buy the next one.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The intriguing title, 25 Jan 2013
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The intriguing title caught my eye and initially I bought this for my train mad brother. Before I wrapped it I thought I would just look inside and I was hooked. Excellent characters well described. I believe it to be historically correct but even if it wasn't it gave quite an insight into the building of a railway and the problems at that time
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting alternative, 3 July 2013
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M. G. Free "miklfree" (Yorkshire) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Baghdad Railway Club (Jim Stringer) (Paperback)
Another railway detective novel.Not quite as good as the Jim Stringer novels set in England but still an enjoyable read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Great period detail, 30 Dec 2013
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Ian Barker (Bolton, UK) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Baghdad Railway Club (Jim Stringer) (Paperback)
Jim Stringer is never going to go down as one of the great detectives. Things tend to happen around him and he succeeds almost despite himself.

The joy of this series, however, is in the historical detail. Martin brilliantly evokes the time and place of the early 20th century with the occasional sly poke at the present day.

It's also interesting to read a book set in the first world war that isn't about the Western Front.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars not quite what i expected, 17 Jun 2013
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I think that this book was a little disappointing it did have some good parts but on a whole I would probably not read any thing from the same author.
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The Baghdad Railway Club (Jim Stringer)
The Baghdad Railway Club (Jim Stringer) by Andrew Martin (Paperback - 7 Feb 2013)
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