Customer Reviews

3
4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
0
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0

Your rating(Clear)Rate this item
Share your thoughts with other customers

There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on 8 April 2010
Concerning visual art, Beckett once said "I used never to be happy with a picture till it was literature, but now that need is gone". How It Is is the culmination of this development reflected in his own work.
For those not familiar with much of his output, I would suggest a long term approach... start with All Strange Away (Calderbooks) to ascertain if you have a taste for Beckett's later style. Try the more conventional early novel Murphy followed by Watt as a halfway house. Reward yourself with the How It Is peak. Take as long as you need to read it first time round. Thereafter, try reading it in a week... then read it in one day. How It Is can be revisited again and again. Immerse yourself in the way one approaches a painting (as when the need to convert a picture to literature has gone).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on 7 February 2012
"How is it?" by Samuel Beckett came quickly and in fantastic condition (and took a minimal amount of time to come!). A fantastic read that I only wish I could pass onto others (sadly I can't because my notes are all over the book!). Thank you for a speedy delivery though!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on 27 August 2011
It is a very strange book. Beckett describes a journey, a journey to Pim. The book is separated into three parts. The first part is the way to Pim. All what he had is a bag with his belongings. He lies in the mud and crawl his way to him. The second part is close by Pim. He is beating him and enjoys it very much. The third part is the time after Pim. It is the instalment of the unnameable. It is a flush of words. The words are spoken to the reader. It had no direct meaning. The person speaks it just as he hears it. You can read it with astonishment and you can't see a plot. It shows the existence of man to me. All what you are, is symbolised in this little person who lies in the mud and wants someone to hang on. A person to speak with. Toescape from the solitariness. The process is the way ahead. The book is like clockwork. Every word hangs on the other and in the end you can see the whole concept. It is the rhythm of the words that shows his concept.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this item also viewed
Murphy
Murphy by Samuel Beckett (Paperback - 21 May 2009)
£7.99


Texts for Nothing and Other Shorter Prose, 1950-1976
Texts for Nothing and Other Shorter Prose, 1950-1976 by Samuel Beckett (Paperback - 3 Jun. 2010)
£7.99
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.